Wheelers Hill Secondary College Senior School Handbook 2020

28 June 2019
Issue One
Year 10 Core
Year 10 Electives
Year 10 - English Electives
Year 10 - Health and Physical Education Electives
Year 10 - Humanities Electives
Year 10 - Language Electives
Year 10 Leadership and Peer Support
Year 10 - Performing Arts Electives
Year 10 - Technology Electives
Year 10 - Visual Arts Electives
Year 10 Elective Costs
Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE)
VCE Studies - 2020
VCE English
VCE Health and Physical Education
VCE Humanities
VCE Mathematics
VCE Performing Arts
VCE Science
VCE Technology
VCE Digital Technology
VCE Visual Arts
VCE Subject Charges
Advanced Studies
VET & Alternative Pathways
Wheelers Hill Secondary College
(03) 9561 5811
Raphael Drive
Wheelers Hill, Victoria, 3150
AU

Year 10 Core

Structure

The curriculum structure for Year 10 students provides the best possible educational opportunities for students and a seamless transition from the Middle School to the Senior School. 

 

Year 10 can be a pre-VCE year, an introductory VCE year or a combination of both.  For many students, it is a pre-VCE year during which students build on and consolidate the skills that they will need to apply during their VCE years. 

 

Year 10 students are also able to access TAFE subjects and to enrol in electives that develop competencies and skills that will help them to achieve their career aspirations. 

 

In the Year 10 structure, most subjects operate for 6 periods per fortnight and are timetabled in conjunction with Year 11 and 12 subjects.  In addition to this, Year 10 students will have a seventh period of English and Mathematics and also study Futures for 2 periods per fortnight.  In other words, all Year 10 students will complete 40 periods (each for 72 minutes) per fortnight. 

 

As a consequence of this structure, students in Year 10 can select Year 11 subjects (i.e. VCE Units 1 & 2 or TAFE units) without timetable difficulties or ramifications.  (Similarly it allows students in Year 11 to enrol in Year 12 subjects i.e. VCE Units 3 and 4 or VET units.) The success of this application is subject to counselling,  Year 9 assessments consistently 'Above the Expected Level' and teacher recommendation.

Advice to Year 10 Students

You are all participating in Futures where the job investigation will help you decide on what studies you need to undertake to achieve your goal, together with work experience, Domain leaders talking to you, the information in the handbook and the information night will help you with the process.  These are all a very important parts of the process that assists you to identify your personal strengths, interests, possible career paths, future study, set goals and plan for the future.

 

As part of Futures you will be completing a Career Action Plan (CAP) on Compass.  This plan will help you to identify your strengths and possible career interest areas.  You will also be completing Career Voyage, a career program online that also helps you identify possible career interest areas.  The VTAC website will also be used and students are required to undertake course preference practice.

 

It is important that you choose the program that is “tailor made” for you, providing motivation and the greatest opportunity for success.  It should not be to follow your friends or to do what you think others expect of you.  The program must be something that inspires, motivates and offers the best chance of success, increased confidence and self-esteem.

 

Research all possible courses and careers

Consider your career interests and aspirations.  You may wish to consult the latest edition of the "Job Guide” available on-line.

 

You will be researching identified careers and what they involve.  Try to identify University or TAFE courses that will provide the type of training you will need to enter the career areas that interest you.  Read the following section on “Vocational Education and Training Programs”.

 

Prerequisites

Identify any specific pre-requisites for the Tertiary and TAFE courses you have identified.  These pre-requisites are normally for Year 12 subjects, but this directly influences your subject choices in Year 11.  This information can be accessed on the VTAC website (www.vtac.edu.au).

 

You will notice that some subjects now attract bonuses from some tertiary courses to indicate to you the value they place on that subject(s) as a preparation for the course.

 

Research information on the VCE studies available

To undertake a course in VCE, it is essential that you have successfully completed appropriate studies in the previous year.

 

Even though many tertiary and TAFE courses do not require any Maths subject as a pre-requisite, choosing a Mathematics subject appropriate to your level of ability will give you a greater range of options. Discuss appropriate Maths selections with your teachers and remember that a successful Year 10 assessments and a recommendation from your Maths teacher is essential for entry into some Maths courses.

 

Read the Unit (subject) descriptions contained in this Handbook and gather unit advice sheets distributed by the different learning areas at the VCE Information Evening.

 

Discuss your program with people.  These may be your teachers, current VCE students and your parents. You may wish to discuss your program with the Pathways Counsellor and get more detailed information on the courses and careers that interest you.

Year 10 Core Subjects

English, Maths, Science and Futures are compulsory whole year subjects for all students

English

All English courses aim to extend students’ competence in using language in four main areas:  reading, writing, speaking and listening. 

Course Description:       

Teaching methods include the use of assignments and oral discussions, as well as more structured methods designed to teach the formal skills of grammar, spelling, analysis of language used by the media, story and essay writing and comprehension.  Homework generally involves the completion of work set in class and extra reading.  At all times students are encouraged to respect others opinions and to learn to cooperate in both work and social situations. 

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Imaginative, reflective and descriptive writing pieces

Oral presentations

Analytical/Comparative essay writing

Exam

 

Maths

Students are required to choose either Maths General or Maths Methods.

Maths General

Course Description:       

The Victorian Curriculum: Mathematics aims to ensure that students:

* are confident, creative users and communicators of mathematics, able to investigate, represent and interpret situations in their personal and work lives and as active citizens

* develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of mathematical concepts and fluency with processes, and are able to pose and solve problems and reason in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability

* recognise connections between the areas of mathematics and other disciplines and appreciate mathematics as an accessible and enjoyable discipline to study.

* developing competency in the use of ICT skills as they apply to mathematics in particular the use of CAS calculators.

Students continue to strengthen their knowledge and skills in mathematics which further enables each student to study general mathematics in VCE and beyond.

Assessment:                     

All mathematics subjects use the following forms of assessment in Year 10:

Tests

Problem solving tasks

Projects and investigations

Semester Examinations

Pathway:                          

Students considering undertaking General Mathematics Units 1 & 2 should select Maths General.

Maths Methods

Course Description:      

While still working within the framework and aims of the Victorian Curriculum: Mathematics this course exposes students to more advanced problem solving and analytical tasks and is an alternative to Maths General.  The course is suited to students who have a strong appreciation and understanding of mathematics and would like to pursue advanced or multiple mathematics subjects in VCE.

Assessment:                     

All mathematics subjects use the following forms of assessment in Year 10:

Tests

Problem solving tasks

Projects  and investigations

Semester Examinations

Pathway:                           

Students who wish to undertake Mathematical Methods and/or Specialist Mathematics in VCE are strongly advised to select and undertake Maths Methods.

Special requirements:  

Participation in this course is dependent on performance in Year 9 Mathematics.  Students may be required to undertake a selection examination.

Science

Course Description:       

Year 10 science gives students the opportunity to further develop their scientific skills in predicting outcomes, testing ideas, solving problems, thinking critically and developing evidence-based conclusions.  Students learn about global concepts and processes in Biology, Psychology, Chemistry and Physics.  They develop practices to learn about scientific knowledge, as well as an understanding of science’s contribution to our culture and society, and its applications in our lives. 

Year 10 science students explore four different streams of science focusing on aspects of Biology, Psychology, Chemistry and Physics.  This learning allows students to develop scientific awareness and skills necessary to participate actively in everyday life, as well as exposing them to the key sciences studied at VCE.

Assessment:                    

All Science courses use the following methods of assessment:

Extended experimental investigation presented as a scientific poster

Practical experiments and write-ups

Research assignments

Topic tests

Semester examinations

Futures

Course Description:      

This course will be studied by all Year 10 students for the whole year.  The topics covered will examine the nature of the Australian workforce, a range of post-school options related to career choice, and the role of government in Australia.

The course will also provide training in a variety of areas including applying for a job, interview skills, goal-setting, time management, study skills, test taking, and developing healthy relationships with peers and adults.

During the year, students  can undertake a work experience placement, Industry visits and the opportunity to work in the community on a voluntary basis. They research work-related practices throughout this unit.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Goal Setting

Career Portfolio

Occupational Health and Safety Certificate

Class Presentations

Year 10 Electives

Curriculum Structure

Year 10 students will study 14 semester units during the year i.e. 7 units per semester, subject to the following requirements:

ALL Year 10 units are taught for 6 periods per fortnight except English and Mathematics (7 each) and Futures (2).

Students may choose a MAXIMUM of two electives  from any Domain area

Subjects offered by Domain Area

ENGLISH

English Literature

Writer's Workshop

 

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education

Sport Education

Health Education

 

HUMANITIES         

Geography

History 

Accounting & Business Management

Legal Studies & Economics

Global Conflict and Crises

 

LANGUAGES                  

Selecting a Language is optional at Year 10.

Students wanting to study a Language should choose a sequence of two units.

French 1 and French 2.

 

LEADERSHIP AND PEER SUPPORT

Students wishing to participate in the Peer Support Program will be required to submit an application form and attend an interview. This unit will be the equivalent of one elective selection.

 

PERFORMING ARTS

Drama

Music

Theatre Studies

                                                                          

TECHNOLOGIES          

Design & Technology (Computing)

Design, Coding and Robotics

Hospitality

Design & Technology (Food)

Design & Technology (Metal/Acrylic)

Design & Technology (Wood)

 

VISUAL ARTS

Art

Photography

Visual Communication Design

 

 

Year 10 - English Electives

English Literature

Course Description:       

This elective involves analysis and discussion of a range of novels, plays, poetry and films.

Assessment:                              

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Essays 

Oral Presentations

Comprehension questions

Text Responses

Exam

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Literature Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

 

Writers' Workshop

Course Description

Writers' Workshop gives students the opportunity to hone their writing and editing skills. With a focus on creative writing, students will learn to experiment with language and rigorously edit their own and others' work. This subject will be perfect for students who enjoy the more creative elements of English and Literature, but want to go further. They will also be exposed to different genres of literature and literary styles. By the end of the unit, students will have produced a writing folio and three final work-shopped pieces.

Assessment Tasks

Writing Folio - three final pieces

Proposed Topics

Personal writing

Short stories

Poetry

Descriptive

Stream of consciousness

Literary Genres TBC

Editing and work-shopping

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students  undertaking English and/or Literature Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Year 10 - Health and Physical Education Electives

Electives

Students can choose a MAXIMUM of two electives from this Domain Area

Health Education

Course Description:      

The aim of this course is to broaden and deepen students’ knowledge of the health issues currently examined in Years 7 to 9.  The course will focus on the physical, social and emotional health of individuals and families throughout their life span.  Within this framework, students will also study growth & development, relationships, risk taking, mental health, youth homelessness, and current issues relevant to young people.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Research assignment

Media reviews

Reports

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Health and Human Development Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Physical Education

Course Description:       

The Year 10 Physical Education course aims to provide opportunities to learn the fundamental knowledge, skills and vocabulary required for VCE Physical Education. A variety of key topics will be covered including, Body and Energy Systems and Training Methods and Principles. A number of practical lessons will be included, such as weight training, circuit training and group fitness sessions, in which theory content can be explored in further detail.

This class involves both theory and practical sessions throughout the week.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Practical Laboratory Reports

Fitness Assessment

Assignments

Tests

Exam

 Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Physical Education Units 1 & 2 select this subject. 

Special Requirements:

Students are required to wear the Wheelers Hill Secondary College Physical Education uniform to all practical classes.

 

Sport Education

Course Description:       

The Year 10 Sport Education course aims to provide students with the opportunity to learn key skills and knowledge related to VCE Physical Education as well as improve their fitness and fundamental motor skills.  A variety of topics will be covered such as  Skill Acquisition, Biomechanics and Physical Activity and Sedentary behaviours.  A number of practical lessons will be included.  These will consist of a variety of the following sports from each category:

* Invasion games (basketball, netball, AFL, soccer)

* Striking Sports (badminton, tennis, softball, cricket, hockey)

* Target (golf, lawn bowls).

This class involves both theory and practical sessions throughout the week

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following forms of assessment:

Participation and application of motor skills

Tests

Laboratory reports

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Physical Education Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Special requirements:  

Students are required to wear the Wheelers Hill Secondary College Physical Education uniform to all classes.

Year 10 - Humanities Electives

Electives

Students can choose a MAXIMUM of two electives from this Domain area.

Geography

Course Description:

Geography is the study of where geographical features are located and why they are there.  It looks at the interaction between human activities and natural processes and develops an understanding of the distribution of human and natural phenomena on or near the surface of the Earth from a spatial perspective.

Through studying geography, students develop knowledge and skills that enable them to understand the complex interactions of their world. They learn to participate effectively as global citizens in the sustainable use and management of the world’s resources.

This elective will introduce students to the skills and knowledge necessary for them to successfully complete VCE Geography.  Topics will cover Natural Environments, Human Environments, Regional Resources and Global Perspectives.

Assessment:

This subject includes the following methods of assessment:

  • Assignment work
  • Tests
  • Exam
  • Class Presentations
  • Fieldwork Reports

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Geography Units 1 and 2 select this subject.

Special Requirements:

This subject will require attendance on fieldwork excursions.

Global Conflict and Crises

Course Description:

This elective will introduce students to the study of politics by considering global conflicts such as terrorism, human rights and war. Students will evaluate organisations such as the United Nations and their effectiveness in managing these crises. It will also explore the role and responsibilities of Australia in the international community and consider globalisation and its economic and political impacts in the Asia Pacific region. Students will consider and debate global issues from multiple perspectives in order to develop their understanding of what it means to be an active and informed citizen in our ever changing world. This elective would lead students into the study of Global or Australian politics in Year 11 and 12.   

Assessment Tasks:

This subject includes the following methods of assessment:

Written Reports/evaluations  

Mock UN Conference

Case Studies

Examination

Proposed Topics:

  • The United Nations – including their role in the international community and evaluation of how they have dealt with a global crisis 
  • 9/11 and the War on Terror
  • The Refugee Crisis
  • Globalisation
  • Australia’s role in the Asia Pacific and international obligations

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Australian and Global Politics Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

 

History

Course Description:

This core unit incorporates studies in History and this course is assessed using the Victorian Curriculum standards.

The focus of History is The Modern World and Australia. Within this study, there two depth studies which the teacher can elect to teach in more detail: World War II and Twentieth Century Ideologies such as Nazism, Communism and Capitalism.

Assessment: 

This subject could use the following methods of assessment:

  • Research projects
  • Essays
  • Tests
  • Class presentations
  • Work Folio of activities
  • Exam

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking History Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Introduction to Accounting & Business Management

Course Description:      

This course aims to introduce students to two of the four Commerce disciplines.

1. Introduction to VCE Accounting 

This unit focuses on the financial recording, reporting and decision-making processes of a sole proprietor small business. Students study both theoretical and practical aspects of accounting.

2. Introduction to VCE Business Management 

This unit examines the ways businesses manage resources to achieve objectives. The VCE Business Management study design follows the process from the first idea for a business concept, to planning and establishing a business, through to the day-to-day management of a business. It also considers changes that need to be made to ensure continued success of a business

Assessment:

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

  • Assignment work
  • Tests
  • Exam

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Accounting Units 1 & 2 and/or Business Management Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

 

Introduction to Legal Studies & Economics

Course Description:      

This course aims to introduce students to the Commerce VCE studies of Legal Studies and Economics.

1. Introduction to Legal Studies 

This unit examines the need for laws and the difference between legal and non-legal rules.

Students develop an understanding of the sources of law and principles which are essential to Australia’s legal system and study the structure of our parliamentary system. Through the study of types of legal disputes, students apply knowledge of legal concepts and principles to a range of actual and/or hypothetical scenarios and use legal reasoning to determine possible culpability in a criminal and/or civil matter.

2. Introduction to Economics 

In this unit students undertake the study of key economic concepts such as scarcity, opportunity cost, economic resources and maximising the production of goods and services. Students research the characteristics of various Economic systems which exist to coordinate and organise the production of goods and services. Globalisation and its effects on living standards in the Australian economy is explored.

Assessment: 

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

  • Tests
  • Case Studies
  • PowerPoints
  • Assignment work
  • Exam

Pathway:

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Legal Studies Units 1 and 2, Accounting Units 1 & 2 and/or Business Management Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

Year 10 - Language Electives

French

Course Description:      

Semester 1: This unit aims to enable learners to communicate in speech and writing, to appreciate and respect the views and cultures of other people and to develop self-awareness and a sense of identity.  Students will consolidate their language learning skills of listening, reading and writing through the study of selected topics about their personal world. Cultural studies will include the analysis of tales, fables, short stories, myths and legends from France and other French speaking countries.

Semester 2: This unit aims to enable learners to communicate in speech and writing, to appreciate and respect the views and cultures of other people and to develop self-awareness and a sense of identity.  This unit of study is essential for the continuation of this subject at VCE level.  Students will consolidate their language learning skills of listening, reading and writing through the study of selected topics about their personal world.  Cultural study will include the French revolution.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following forms of assessment:

Short Answer Tests

Essays

Research Assignments

Oral Presentations

Listening Assessments

Exam

Pathway:                            

Students considering undertaking French Units 1 & 2 must select this subject.

Special requirements:  

This elective is a whole year subject.

Indonesian

Course Description:       

Semester 1: Student Exchange Program

This unit aims to enable learners to communicate in speech and writing, to appreciate and respect the views and cultures of other people and to develop self-awareness and a sense of identity.  It provides a foundation for continuity to VCE level studies in Indonesian language and culture.

Topics include personal introductions, future aspirations, writing student exchange applications and preparing for the journey

Semester 2: The Journey across the Indonesian Archipelago

This unit aims to enable learners to communicate in speech and writing, to appreciate and respect the views and cultures of other people and to develop self-awareness and a sense of identity.  It provides a foundation for continuity to VCE level studies in Indonesian language and culture.

Topics include weekend activities, tourist attractions, visiting Sumatra and making appropriate speeches.

Assessment:                      

This subject uses the following forms of assessment:

Short Answer Tests

Essays

Research Assignments

Oral Presentations

Listening Assessments

Exam

Pathway:                            

Students considering undertaking Indonesian Units 1 & 2 must select this subject.

Special requirements:  

This elective is a whole year subject.

Year 10 Leadership and Peer Support

Year 10 Leadership and Peer Support

Course Description:      

This course aims to develop leadership skills whereby students study and analyse leadership strategies and represent the College as a student leader.  Students plan and evaluate lessons on a range of transition topics.  They put these ideas into practice by leading a small group of junior students on a regular basis.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

  • Leadership Activities Booklet
  • Scenario Analysis
  • Peer Support Lesson Plans
  • Community Leadership

Students wishing to undertake this elective need to complete the 'Application for Leadership and Peer Support' which can be found on Compass under School Documentation.

 

Year 10 - Performing Arts Electives

Electives

Students can choose a MAXIMUM of two electives from this Domain area.

Drama

Course Description:       

In this unit students will be introduced the theatrical style of Non-naturalism. This is the major theatre style that students of VCE Drama will need to be familiar with, and this subject is to prepare students for this pathway. Furthermore, students who select this elective will participate in the Malthouse Theatre “Suitcase Series” project. Students will work on a class production and present the work in the city to a panel of experts and schools across Victoria, in the Suitcase Series showcase.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Ensemble workshops

Written Analysis of a Live Performance

Suitcase Series workshop and performance

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering VCE Drama Units 1 & 2 should select this subject.

Special Requirements:    

Students will be required to attend a live performance as an incursion or excursion.

Music

Course Description:       

Students will focus on developing skills in practical music and performance in solo and group contexts, studying performance, performing and developing skills in aural comprehension and the organisation of sound.  Students will present a solo and group performance, demonstrate prepared technical work and perform for a variety of purposes.  Selected works are analysed to enhance performance interpretation and to understand their context, influences and characteristics and styles in line with tasks from VCE Music.  This subject also focuses on VCE based music theory relevant to performance and contains an end of semester examination.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Folio – Performance Works & Rehearsals

Research Assignments – Musical Instrument

Audio Visual Journal – A collection of notes on the historical context of Contemporary Music

Exam – Aural & Theory – 1 Hour

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering choosing VCE Music Performance Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Special Requirements:

Instrumental or Vocal experience (e.g. – Private Lessons or successful music studies at Year 9)

Theatre Studies

Course Description:       

In this unit students will be introduced to the stagecraft elements of live theatre performance. These include not only acting and direction, but set, costume, lighting and sound design. Students will learn the process of each of these roles, as well as looking in depth at theatrical styles in history. Students will participate in practical workshops, theory lessons and construct performances. Students will also have the opportunity to see a professional production in the city, to analyse the use of stagecraft elements on the stage.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Design folios and performance workshops

Written Analysis of a Live Performance

Class production rehearsal and performance

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering VCE Theatre Studies Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Special Requirements:    

Students will be required to attend a live performance as an incursion or excursion.

Year 10 - Technology Electives

Electives

Students can choose a MAXIMUM of two electives from this Domain area.

Computing

Course Description:       

This course aims to explore a range of different software packages including programming and web authoring.  Skills include analysing and developing solutions to information problems and using a range of software features, information processes and equipment.  Students will learn how data, information and networked digital systems can be used to meet a range of users’ current and future needs. When creating solutions students apply relevant stages of the problem-solving methodology. Students will investigate appropriate ethical and social behaviours for users of ICT and analyse the impact of ICT in society.  A logical approach and good problem solving skills are required to complete the more challenging tasks.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

  • Projects - software based solution to information problems
  • Research tasks
  • Semester Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Computing Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Special Requirements:

Basic knowledge and interest in computers and digital technologies.

Design, Coding and Robotics

Course Description:

This course is designed for students interested in creating and implementing solutions using the LEGO Mindstorms software to program Robots as well as exploring other programming languages such as Visual Basic and Python, along with other digital multimedia packages.  Students will combine the skills of design and development to create programs to get a purpose built robot to complete tasks or compete. They will be given the opportunity to become creators and critical users of games through design, coding, testing and evaluation. 

Assessment Tasks:

  • Programming projects
  • Research projects
  • Semester exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Computing Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

Special Requirements:

Basic knowledge and interest in computers and digital technologies.

Design & Technology (Food)

Course Description:       

The Food Studies course has been designed for students interested in furthering their studies in areas of food, nutrition, health and human development. This course explores the influences on food choices of such things as cultural diversity and dietary needs.  The course covers key concepts such as the nutritional components of food and strategies which will enable us to make healthy food choices.  The links between nutrition, development and health and food are also explored.  These understandings will be underpinned with a variety of food preparation activities.

Assessment:                     

Practical Cooking 

Design Briefs

Research Assignments

Semester Exam

 

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Food Studies Units 1 & 2 and Health and Human Development Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Hospitality

Course Description:       

This unit is designed for students with a passion for food and a desire to be innovative with a range of ingredients. They will work individually and in teams to research and design new food products. The unit will focus on the Hospitality Industry standards for the principles of cooking and developing their understanding of methods of cooking and functional properties of food. Units include – Safe and hygienic food handling to prevent food poisoning, meal planning, food for special occasions and entertaining, functions of natural components, savoury and sweet baking and decorating.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Design Briefs

Practical Cooking

Research Assignments

Semester Exam


 

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Food Studies Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Design & Technology (Materials)

Course Description:       

This course aims for students to refine and further build on skills gained in previous years.  Students will be able to produce either functional ware or decorative objects.  Emphasis will be placed on design skills and the appreciation of design principles.  There are research and investigation units that are specific to practical activities.  Two pieces of practical work are to be completed.

Students are expected to continue to demonstrate safe and responsible work practices.  Importance is placed on the correct use of tools and care in crafting on each job.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Production plans 

Research assignment

Practical work

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Design & Technology Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

Design & Technology (Wood)

Course Description:       

This course provides a wide range of practical experiences that build on students’ skills.  The Woodwork program at Year 10 level has been designed to provide a comprehensive background in woodcraft.  Skills include the uses and making of a variety of wood joints and an appreciation of design development and design awareness.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Production plans & Journals

Research assignment

Practical work

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Design & Technology Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Year 10 - Visual Arts Electives

Electives

Students can choose a MAXIMUM of two electives from this Domain area.

Art

Course Description:       

The Art course covers a wide range of media and techniques, which can include painting, printmaking, drawing and mixed media.  Students will create a range of artworks which communicate, challenge and express their own and others' ideas. Developmental work following the studio process (completed in a Visual Diary) is assessed in conjunction with the finished artwork and is equally as important.  Included in the Visual Diary will be idea development, research of ideas, thumbnail sketches/plans of artworks, experimentation with techniques and media, and a self-reflection after each unit studied.  The development of personal style, originality, creativity, technical and design abilities are major components of assessments for this course.

Students will respond to theoretical tasks that reflect their practical work. Students will develop skills in critical and creative thinking whilst analysing how artist compositions and practices are influences by visual art histories and cultural/social contexts.  A range of research, analysis and and ‘art’ terminology tasks will be completed.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Folio of experimental work completed in Visual Diary

Folio of final artworks

Art appreciation including research, analysis and terminology tasks

Exam

Pathway:            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Studio Arts Units 1 & 2 and Visual Communication Units 1 & 2  select this subject.

Special Requirements:

Students may be required to attend the local gallery in order to complete first hand observation of art works.

Photography

Course Description:       

This course is an introduction to black and white SLR and digital photography theory and practice.  The areas of focus in this course are: analysis and discussion of photographs and how they are constructed, exploring and developing ideas via observation and research into different styles.  Students will develop skills and techniques to structure photographs in a chosen theme, taking photographs with SLR and digital cameras, developing black and white film, printing black and white photographs, manipulating digital images and selecting and presenting photographs for a particular audience.  Vocabulary specific to The Arts and Photography is explicitly taught and assessed.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Folio of experimental work completed in Visual Diary

Folio of final artworks

Photographic analysis tasks

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is recommended that students considering undertaking Studio Arts Units 1 & 2 select this subject. 

Visual Communication & Design

Course Description:       

Students use a visual diary to problem solve when developing and refining concepts and/or ideas for specific visual communications.  They experiment and practice with media materials and/or ICT technologies, design elements and design principles to develop their personal design style.  Students refine and create final presentation pieces for a specified audience, working to a brief.  The written component to the course involves analysis of how designers use visual messages and the stylistic, technical and aesthetic decisions made by designers to create effective communications.  Students will evaluate ways that cultural, social and political trends impact their own and others’ design decisions.  Appropriate design language is taught to support this work.

Assessment:                     

This subject uses the following methods of assessment:

Design process within Visual Diary 

Folio of Visual Communications

Analysis tasks of  Visual Communications

Exam

Pathway:                            

It is strongly recommended that students considering undertaking Visual Communication Units 1 & 2 and Studio Arts Units 1 & 2 select this subject.

Special Requirements:

Students may be required to attend relevant excursions to experience design work in an authentic setting.

Year 10 Elective Costs

Year 10 Elective Costs 2020
 

Domain

Elective

Cost

English

English Literature

$50

 

Writer’s Workshop

$50

Health and Physical Education

Health Education

$55

 

Physical Education

$90

 

Sport Education

$80

Humanities

Geography

$50

 

Global Conflict and Crises

$50

 

History

$50

 

Intro. to Accounting and Bus. Man.

$50

 

Intro. to Legal Studies & Economics

$50

Languages

French (per semester)

$50

 

Indonesian (per semester)

$50

Leadership

Leadership and Peer Support

$50

Performing Arts

Drama

$55

 

Music

$55

 

Theatre Studies

$55

Technology

Computing

$60

 

Design, Coding & Robotics

$60

 

Food Studies

$70

 

Hospitality

$70

 

Material Studies

$65

 

Woodwork

$95

Visual Arts

Art

$60

 

Photography

$90

 

Visual Communication and Design

$55

Please note, charges may be adjusted for 2020 following review by School Council.

 

Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE)

The VCE 

The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) is the certificate that the majority of students in Victoria receive on satisfactory completion of their secondary education.  The VCE provides diverse pathways to further study or training at university or TAFE and to employment.  During the second semester of Year 10 at Wheelers Hill Secondary College you will already have begun your transition to the VCE.  You will begin to notice that work requirements become more complex and that you are asked to use higher order thinking skills more frequently.  Teachers will be encouraging you to develop and exhibit the work habits and responsibility expected in the VCE.  These take a considerable time to effectively establish and are supported by suitable study habits in years 7 to 10.

 

How is the VCE different?

You are expected to take more responsibility for your own learning, with the teacher acting more as a facilitator to the learning rather than a director.  It is not just a matter of gaining skills and knowledge, but of being able to apply them in an increasing range of situations.  The challenge is to become more analytical and to be able to undertake problem solving.  There will be more unsupervised study time outside normal lessons, requiring increased self-discipline and motivation to complete tasks and revise efficiently.  Year 12 students will have access to the VCE Study Centre outside of their scheduled class time.  During Years 7 to 10 the College designs content, assessment, rules and guidelines within a framework provided by the government.  The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) determine the study designs, rules and guidelines for the VCE, which must be followed.  Therefore, it is very important that you understand and follow these as our school cannot modify them for you.  Full details are on the VCAA web site http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au.

 

What will help me to do my best? 

As motivation and self-direction are very important, it is crucial that you select studies that interest you, give you confidence, or offer positive challenges.  Those who have excellent organisation and time management skills will work more efficiently and find it easier to work independently.  A lifestyle where a strong work ethic is balanced with spending time with family, friends and other interests, is important in your personal development.  Adequate rest, exercise and good nutrition also play a part in helping you to maintain good health and cope with the additional study required (up to 15 hours of efficient study at home each week in Year 11).  Having a positive and proactive outlook, accepting support from and providing support to peers and family, accepting personal responsibility and making the most of the available opportunities will assist you to always do your personal best.

 

How does the VCE work? 

It is a program of study, made up of 20 to 24 units that you select under certain rules.  Each subject (called a study) has 2 or 4 units, each unit taking one semester (half a year) to complete.  Units 1 & 2 are generally taken in year 11 and Units 3 & 4 in Year 12.  Units 3 and 4 are usually more demanding and challenging.  You normally do 6 studies (12 Units) in Year 11 and 5 studies (10 Units) in Year 12.  Some students have already done units 1-2 in a study in Year 10 and may be able to do Units 3-4 in Year 11.  If you have not done Units 1-2 but have done very well in a study in Year 10, you may apply to undertake Units 3-4 in Year 11 in some subjects.  Completing a Unit 3-4 sequence in Year 11 will allow you to have an extra study score to add to your final total rank (ATAR).  You may take 3 years to complete the VCE with a combination of Units 1-2 and 3-4 in the second year.  This may be an option if you wish to try lots of studies or do TAFE courses that do not count towards the VCE.

The main features of the VCE

Units 1 and 2         

To satisfactorily complete a unit, you must be able to demonstrate achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit (usually through designated coursework tasks).  Coursework tasks may be research activities, tests, classroom presentations, essays, comprehension questions, etc.  Teachers will select the tasks that they consider most appropriate.  These coursework tasks, with the exception of some subjects with a practical component, will usually be undertaken during class time and during a fairly short time span.  The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority require each outcome to be given an S or N.  Special provision is available for students who have suffered some disadvantage during the time an assessment task is being undertaken.

 

Units 3 and 4          

In addition to the above,

  • Work which you do in class as assessment is called School Assessed Coursework (SAC).  In the case of subjects such as Art, Studio Art and Visual Communication, this is referred to as a School Assessed Tasks (SAT) which consists of folios or models;
  • Each SAC or SAT is graded i.e. teachers are required to give each task a numerical score;
  • SACs or SATs must be completed on the set date/dates unless you have a medical certificate for an illness;
  • Students will not be able to re-do SACs or SATs in order to gain a higher score (scores cannot be changed).  However, you may be able to re-do work if it has an impact on whether an outcome will receive an S or N;
  • The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) prescribe the structure of the assessment tasks to be used to assess each outcome.  The weighting to be given to each scored assessment task is also prescribed.
  • In all VCE studies, an examination is conducted at the end of Unit 4.  The Study Score for each study is derived from coursework assessment (completed mainly during class time) and the external examinations.  Study Scores are used to calculate the Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).

VCE at Wheelers Hill Secondary College

Wheelers Hill Secondary College is offering a large number of VCE studies in a flexible program catering for student needs.  While the VCE is normally completed over two years of full-time study, the provision exists for you to undertake a greater range of studies or programs and complete your VCE over a longer period of time.  Timetabling arrangements allow you to study Units 1 and 2 (Year 11) and a Unit 3 and 4 sequence (Year 12) concurrently.  You do not have to do all units in a study – Units 1 and 2 may be taken as a single unit (e.g. Geography 1 and History 2). However Units 3 and 4 must be taken as a sequence in that order.  The main premise of the structure of the VCE at Wheelers Hill Secondary College is to maximise student choice over a comprehensive curriculum.

 

Enrolment policy and workload

It is anticipated that you will be a full time student, unless you have special requirements.  In Year 11 you will enrol in a minimum of six units each semester and remain enrolled in these units for the entire semester.  In Year 12 you will enrol in a minimum of five pairs of units for the year and remain enrolled in the pairs of units for the entire year.  If you are undertaking an approved VCE/VET Program which is the equivalent of a VCE subject, you will substitute this for a pair of units each year. Only students with special requirements (i.e.  Experiencing personal difficulties, a chronic illness or have a disability) may undertake fewer units. Having completed an advanced study is NOT an acceptable reason to undertake less subjects.  If you are undertaking a TAFE or Training program which does not carry credit for VCE, you may be required to take an extra year to complete the VCE. 

 

Attendance

100% attendance is required to meet the VCAA requirements of course work completed in class.  If you are absent , you will require a medical certificate to avoid not satisfying the requirements of an outcome and therefore the unit.  This certificate cannot be post-dated.

 

Studies undertaken elsewhere

Students are encouraged to undertake Language units, which are not offered by Wheelers Hill Secondary College, at the Victorian School of Languages (Saturday morning school).  Many students are maintaining their cultural heritage by studying languages their families speak at home. However, these subjects are voluntary and so not allow students to reduce the number of subjects undertaken at the College. Vocational Education and Training (VET) programs at a local TAFE or school can contribute to the VCE and the attainment of a VET Certificate. Enrolment with an external Language provider does not reduce the number of units undertaken at the College (i.e. 12 at Units 1 & 2 and 10 at Units 3 & 4) 

 

VCE rules at Wheelers Hill Secondary College

The rules for the VCE at Wheelers Hill Secondary College are contained in the "VCE Guidelines for Students" which will be provided to students as part of their VCE Orientation Program.  You should familiarise yourself with the rules relating to submission dates, extensions, absences, special provision and lateness.  Ignorance of these rules will not be accepted as a reason for non-compliance and may lead to a Not Satisfactory (N) outcome for a unit of study.

 

What is required to complete the VCE?

To be awarded the VCE, students must satisfactorily complete at least 16 units.  These 16 units must include:

  • an approved combination of at least 3 units from the group of English studies;
  • at least 3 pairs of Unit 3 & 4 studies other than English.

English Requirements

Three units of English studies are required to receive the VCE.  These units may be selected from:

  • English
  • English as Alternative Language (EAL)
  • Literature

However, no more than two units of English Units 1 and 2, (or English EAL Units 1 and 2) and Foundation English Units 1 and 2 may be counted towards the English requirement.

 

In terms of calculating the ATAR, the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Committee (VTAC) has determined that:

  • Satisfactory completion of any English group study Unit 3 & 4 sequence is required.
  • Any of the approved Units 3 & 4 sequences within the English group will be counted in the ATAR, but no more than two will be permitted in the primary four.

 

What is required for the satisfactory completion of a Unit?

Each unit of study has clearly designated outcomes and each of these must be satisfactorily completed in order to pass the unit.  In addition to outcomes, Units 3 & 4 have School Assessed Coursework or School-Assessed Tasks.  The purpose of these is to determine student performance scores for the calculation of ATAR scores and tertiary selection.

 

While special provision exists for students who experience a disadvantage, students who are frequently absent not only miss out on the study program, but may have difficulty in having their work authenticated. Students who are present for less than 100% of classes without the permission of the College can potentially receive an "N" result.

 

Tertiary selection

Tertiary selection depends primarily on the level of performance grades which students achieve in School Assessed Coursework, School Assessed Tasks and external examinations.  These are undertaken in Units 3 and 4 only.

 

At the completion of Year 12, students receive three pieces of information:

  • Letter grades for each of School Assessed Coursework, School Assessed Tasks or examinations from A+ to E and UG.  Most studies have 3 assessment components.
  • VCE Study Score for each study.  In addition to the individual letter grades, students will receive an overall Study Score out of 50 which sums up the student's total achievement in all the assessment components for that study.
  • Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).  Students who have satisfactorily completed their VCE will receive an ATAR score.  This is used by tertiary institutions to offer students places in their courses.  The ATAR is a ranking from 0.00 – 99.95 and is an aggregation of marks adjusted through a scaling process.  It shows each student's ranking in comparison with all other Year 12 students across the state.

VCE Studies - 2020

VCE Studies offered at WHSC for 2020

Learning Area                                                    Studies                                                                                      Units

 

 

1

2

3

4

English

English

 

English as an Alternative Language (EAL)

 

Literature

 

 

Health and Physical Education

Physical Education

 

Health and Human Development

Humanities

Accounting

 

Business Management

 

History – Twentieth Century History

 

 

 

History - Revolutions

 

 

 

Legal Studies

Mathematics

Further Mathematics

 

 

 

General Mathematics

 

 

 

Mathematical Methods

 

Specialist Mathematics

Performing Arts

Dance

 

Drama

 

Music Performance

 

Theatre Studies

Science

Biology

 

Chemistry

 

Physics

 

Psychology

Technology

Computing

 

 

 

Informatics

 

 

 

Product Design and Technology

 

Food Studies

Visual Arts

Studio Arts

 

Visual Communication and Design

 

 

VCE English

English

English is compulsory in VCE.  However, a range of subjects are available which may substitute for or combine with English to meet this requirement. Please note that Literature can be taken in conjunction with English or as an alternative.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:   

This study is designed to enable students to:

  • extend their competence in using Standard Australian English to meet the demands of further study, the workplace, and their own needs and interests;
  • extend their language skills through thinking, reading, writing, speaking and listening;
  • communicate ideas, feelings, observations and information effectively, both orally and in writing, to a range of audiences;
  • extend their competence in planning, reviewing and re-shaping content of print, non-print and multimodal texts to ensure accuracy and coherence of form, language, purpose, audience and context;
  • understand, enjoy and appreciate language in its written, oral and multimodal forms;
  • recognise the structures and features of a wide range of print, non-print and multimodal texts and demonstrate understanding of how authors choose these elements for particular purposes and effects;
  • demonstrate in the creation of their own print, non-print and multimodal texts an ability to make considered and informed choices about form, language, purpose, audience and context;
  • demonstrate an ability to use appropriate metalanguage to discuss their own and others’ texts;
  • identify and comment on the ideas or implied values that underpin texts;
  • recognise the relationship between language and ideas, and the role of language in developing the capacity to express ideas.

Assessment:                 

In Units 1 and 2 students must satisfactorily complete class-based activities and assessment tasks including Writing tasks, Text Responses, Oral Presentations and Written Examinations.  The student’s level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 will be determined by school-assessed coursework (50% of the final assessment) and an end of year examination (50% of the final assessment).

Expected Skills:           

The student should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss ideas, experiences and issues dealt with in selected texts, including current media texts
  • Present ideas and information through oral presentations and writing for different purposes and audiences

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Students must be a resident of Australia for no more than 5 years and have been educated in a language other than English.Please note that students must qualify as an EAL student to access this subject.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

Course details are as for English Units 1, 2, 3 & 4 but EAL students will have some modifications to the course.  For example, in the SACs, School Assessed Coursework, a lesser word count will apply to some essays and a longer time frame for completion of certain writing pieces will be permitted.  Detailed information of each modification will be provided to each EAL student.

Assessment:                    

Assessment is as for English students.  See English Units 1, 2, 3 & 4.

Expected Skills:               

It is expected EAL students will have a fairly competent grasp of English grammar, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation and vocabulary, as the focus is on completing the course and there is little time to spend on acquiring the above skills.

Literature

Please note that Literature can be taken in conjunction with English or as an alternative

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:  

Through the study of novels, plays, short stories and poetry, students develop an ability to analyse and interpret texts. Unit 1 asks students to examine the historical and cultural contexts within which both readers and texts are situated, while Unit 2 students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the world. In Unit 3 students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts, while in Unit 4 students again consider the context of their responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts.

Assessment:

In Units 1 & 2 students must satisfactorily complete class-based activities and assessment tasks including Essays, Oral Presentations, Creative Responses and Written Examinations.

Methods of assessment for Units 3 & 4 are Essays, Oral Presentations, Analysis of Passages and a Written Examination.

Prerequisites:

Successful completion of Year 10 English or Units 1 & 2 English

(if attempting Units 3 & 4)

Expected Skills:                

The student should be able to:

  • Read and analyse complex texts
  • Communicate effectively in class discussions and formal presentations

VCE Health and Physical Education

Health and Human Development

Successful completion of Year 10 Health Education is required for enrolment in Health and Human Development Units 1 & 2. Successful completion of Units 1 & 2 is required for enrolment in Units 3 & 4.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:       

Unit 1: Understanding Health and wellbeing 

This unit looks at health and wellbeing as a concept with varied and evolving perspectives and definitions. It takes the view that health and wellbeing are subject to a wide range of contexts and interpretations, with different meanings for different people. As a foundation to the understanding of health, students should investigate the World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition and also explore other interpretations

Unit 2:  Managing Health and Development 

This unit investigates transitions in health and wellbeing, and development, from lifespan and societal perspectives. Students look at changes and expectations that are part of the progression from youth to adulthood. This unit promotes the application of health literacy skills through an examination of adulthood as a time of increasing independence and responsibility, involving the establishment of long-term relationships, possible considerations of parenthood and management of health-related milestones and changes.

Unit 3:  Australia’s Health in a globalised world

This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts. Students begin to explore health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry. As they consider the benefits of optimal health and wellbeing and its importance as an individual and a collective resource, their thinking extends to health as a universal right. Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Unit 4:  Health and Human Development in a global context

This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Students use data to investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between and within countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live. Students build their understanding of health in a global context through examining changes in burden of disease over time and studying the key concepts of sustainability and human development. They consider the health implications of increased globalisation and worldwide trends relating to climate change, digital technologies, world trade and the mass movement of people.

 

Assessment:                     

A variety of activities are used including case study analyses, data analyses, visual presentations, multimedia presentations, oral presentations, blogs, tests and written responses.

Physical Education

Year 10 Physical Education and/or Sport Education are recommended for Unit 1 and successful completion of Units 1 & 2 Physical Education is expected for Unit 3.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

Unit 1:  The human body in motion

In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise

Unit 2: Physical Activity, Sport and Society.

This unit develops students’ understanding of physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different population groups.

Unit 3: Movement skills and energy for physical activity 

This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise. 

Unit 4: Training to improve performance

In this unit, students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program.

 

Assessment:                     

This course will use the following methods of Assessment:

  • Practical and Laboratory Reports
  • Research Assignments
  • Outcome Tests
  • Examinations
  • Case Studies

Expected Skills:               

Students should be aware that elements of the course require strong scientific skills and knowledge.

Special Course Commitments:

Several excursions related to the various topics studied throughout the course.

VCE Humanities

Accounting

It is strongly recommended that students successfully complete Year 10 Introduction to VCE Accounting and Business Management before enrolling in Units 1 & 2. Successful completion of Units 1 & 2 is highly recommended for enrolment in Units 3 & 4.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

Unit 1: Role of Accounting in Business

This unit explores the establishment of a business and the role of accounting in the determination of business success or failure. In this, it considers the importance of accounting information to stakeholders. Students analyse, interpret and evaluate the performance of the business using financial and non-financial information. They use these evaluations to make recommendations regarding the suitability of a business as an investment.

Students record financial data and prepare reports for service businesses owned by sole proprietors.

Where appropriate, the accounting procedures developed in each area of study should incorporate the application of the Conceptual Framework and financial indicators to measure business performance, and take into account the range of ethical considerations faced by business owners when making decisions, including financial, social and environmental.

Unit 2: Accounting and Decision-Making for a Trading Business

In this unit students develop their knowledge of the accounting process for sole proprietors operating a trading business, with a focus on inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. Students use manual processes and ICT, including spreadsheets, to prepare historical and budgeted accounting reports.

Students analyse and evaluate the performance of the business relating to inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. They use relevant financial and other information to predict, budget and compare the potential effects of alternative strategies on the performance of the business. Using these evaluations, students develop and suggest to the owner strategies to improve business performance.

Where appropriate, the accounting procedures developed in each area of study should incorporate application of the Conceptual Framework, financial indicators and ethical considerations for business owners when making business decisions, including financial, social and environmental.

Unit 3: Financial Accounting for a Trading Business

This unit focuses on financial accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor, and highlights the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording.

Students develop their understanding of the accounting processes for recording and reporting and consider the effect of decisions made on the performance of the business. They interpret reports and information presented in a variety of formats and suggest strategies to the owner to improve the performance of the business.

Where appropriate, the accounting procedures developed in each area of study should incorporate the application of the Conceptual Framework, financial indicators to measure business performance, as well as the ethical considerations of business owners when making decisions, including financial, social and environmental.

Unit 4: Recording, Reporting, Budgeting and Decision-Making

In this unit students further develop their understanding of accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor and the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data, and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording. Both manual methods and ICT are used to record and report.

Students extend their understanding of the recording and reporting process with the inclusion of balance day adjustments and alternative depreciation methods. They investigate both the role and importance of budgeting in decision-making for a business. They analyse and interpret accounting reports and graphical representations to evaluate the performance of a business. From this evaluation, students suggest strategies to business owners to improve business performance.

Where appropriate, the accounting procedures developed in each area of study should incorporate application of the Conceptual Framework and financial indicators to measure business performance, as well as the ethical considerations of business owners when making decisions, including financial, social and environmental.

Assessment:                       

The student’s performance in each outcome will be assessed using one or more of the following:

• structured questions (manual and ICT-based)

• folio of exercises (manual and ICT-based)

• a case study (manual and ICT-based)

• a report (written, oral or ICT-based).

Expected Skills: 

Problem solving, ability to read, interpret and analyse information, good numeracy skills, basic spreadsheet skills.

Special Course Commitments:

Out of scheduled class times may be necessary to complete practice exams and assessment tasks for Units 3 & 4.

Business Management

There are no prerequisite subjects, however 'Introduction to VCE Accounting and Business Management' would provide students with an overview of the  terminology and subject matter. It is not a prerequisite for students to have studied Units 1 and 2 before undertaking Units 3 and 4 but it is highly recommended.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:  

Unit 1: Planning a Business.

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, and the effect of these on planning a business.

Unit 2: Establishing a Business. 

This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years.

Unit 3: Managing a Business.

In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

Unit 4: Transforming a Business.

Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

Assessment:           

The course uses a selection of the following methods of Assessment:

  • Case study analysis
  • Development of a business plan
  • Tests
  • Reports
  • Interviews with business owners
  • Business research (print and online)
  • Media analysis
  • A school-based, business activity
  • A business survey and analysis
  • Exam

Expected Skills:     

The ability to read, interpret, analyse and evaluate information, including complex texts is required for this subject.  Other skills such as organising, problem solving, planning, reporting and decision-making are also required.  It is expected that students take an interest in current business affairs as portrayed in the media.

History - Twentieth Century History

Successful completion of Year 10 History is strongly recommended.

Units 1 & 2

Course Description:

Unit 1: Twentieth Century History 1918 - 1939

Area of Study 1: Ideology and conflict

  • What impact did the treaties such as the Treaty of Versailles which concluded World War One have on nations and people?
  • What were the dominant ideologies of the period? Fascism, Nazism, communism, and Capitalism
  • What impact did the post-war treaties, the development of ideologies and the economic crisis have on the events leading to World War Two?

Area of Study 2: Social and cultural change

  • What continuity and what change is evident between the 1920s and 1930s in social and cultural life?
  • How did ideologies affect the daily lives of people?
  • How did cultural life both reflect and challenge the prevailing political, economic and social circumstances?

Unit 2: Twentieth Century History 1945 - 2000

Area of Study 1: Competing ideologies

  • What were the causes of the Cold War?
  • What were the key characteristics of the ideologies of communism in the USSR and democracy and capitalism in the USA?
  • What was the impact of the Cold War on nations and people?
  • What led to the end of the Cold War?

Area of Study 2: Challenge and change

  • What were the significant causes of challenge to and change in existing political and social orders in the second half of the twentieth century?
  • How did the actions and ideas of popular movements and individuals contribute to change?
  • What impacts did challenge and change have on nations and people?

Assessment:

Assessment tasks over Units 1 and 2 include the following:

  • Historical inquiry
  • Analysis of primary sources
  • Analysis of historical interpretations
  • Essay
  • Exam
  • Vocabulary work

Expected Skills:     

The ability to understand and analyse complex texts and visual material is required.

History - Revolutions

The Successful completion of Year 10 Humanities and Year 11 Twentieth Century History is recommended.

Units 3 & 4

Course Description: 

Unit 3: The American Revolution 1754 to 1789

Unit 4: The Russian Revolution 1896 to 1927

In these units students develop an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of causes and consequences in the revolutionary narrative. They consider how perspectives of the revolution give an insight into the continuity and change experienced by those who lived through dramatic revolutionary moments as well as evaluate other historical interpretations.

Assessment:           

This course will select from the following methods of Assessment:

  • Historical Inquiry
  • Analysis of primary sources
  • Exams
  • Essay
  • Evaluation of historical interpretations

Expected Skills:     

The ability to understand and analyse complex texts and visual material is required.

Legal Studies

There are no prerequisite subjects. However, 'Introduction to VCE Legal Studies and Economics' would provide students with an overview of the  terminology and subject matter. It is not a prerequisite for students to have studied Units 1 and 2 before undertaking Units 3 and 4 but it is highly recommended.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description: 

Unit 1: Guilt and Liability

In this unit students develop an understanding of legal foundations, such as the different types and sources of law and the existence of a court hierarchy in Victoria.

Students investigate key concepts of criminal law and civil law and apply these to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios to determine whether an accused may be found guilty of a crime, or liable in a civil dispute.

Unit 2: Sanctions, Remedies and Rights

This unit focuses on the enforcement of criminal law and civil law, the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute, and the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness.

Students undertake an investigation of two criminal and two civil cases and form a judgment about the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve the principles of justice. Students compare the rights protected in Australia and in another country, and consider possible reforms to the protection of rights. They examine a significant case in relation to the protection of rights in Australia.

Unit 3: Rights and Justice

In this unit students examine the methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes.

Students consider the courts within the Victorian court hierarchy, as well as other Victorian legal institutions and bodies available to assist with cases.

 

Students explore matters such as the rights available to an accused and to victims in the criminal justice system, the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties, and the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve their purposes. Students investigate the extent to which the principles of justice are upheld in the justice system and consider recent reforms.

Unit 4: The People and the Law

In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and state parliaments, and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on parliament in law-making.

Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law-making, and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform.

Assessment:           

This course may use the following methods of Assessment:

  • Tests
  • Case studies
  • Assignments
  • Essays
  • Mock court or role-plays
  • Folios and reports
  • Annotated visual displays
  • Exams

Expected Skills:      The ability to read, analyse and synthesise complex texts and key knowledge is required.

VCE Mathematics

General Mathematics

Students should have successfully completed Maths General or Maths Methods to undertake this subject.

Units 1 & 2

Course Description:      

General Mathematics provides for different combinations of student interests as well as preparation for study of VCE Mathematics at the Unit 3 and 4 level.  Some students will not study Mathematics beyond Units 1 and 2, while others will intend to study Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4.  Others will also be studying Mathematics Methods Units 1 and 2 and intend to study Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 and, in some cases, Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 as well.

 

Units 1 and 2 involve the study of selected material from the areas of study: ‘Algebra and structure’, ‘Arithmetic and number’, ‘Discrete mathematics’, ‘Geometry, measurement and trigonometry’, ‘Graphs of linear and non-linear relations’ and ‘Statistics’.  Students practise mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques and use them to solve standard problems; apply mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations which require investigative, modelling, or problem-solving approaches and use technology appropriately and effectively to learn mathematics and apply it in different contexts. 

Assessment:                      

  • Tests
  • Investigation Project(s)
  • Problem Solving Tasks
  • Semester Examinations

Special Course Commitments:

A CAS Calculator is required and may be retained for Further Mathematics 3 & 4.

(TI-Nspire recommended)

Further Maths

Satisfactory completion of General Mathematics Units 1 & 2 and/or Specialist Mathematics Unit 1 & 2 is highly recommended.

Units 3 & 4

Course Description:      

Further Mathematics consists of two areas of study, a compulsory Core area of study to be completed in Unit 3 and an Applications area of study to be completed in Unit 4. The Core comprises ‘Data analysis’ and ‘Recursion and financial modelling’. The Applications comprises two modules to be completed in their entirety, from a selection of four possible modules: ‘Matrices’, ‘Networks and decision mathematics’, ‘Geometry and measurement’ and ‘Graphs and relations’. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, and graphs. Students should be able to apply these techniques with and without the use of technology using estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic, financial and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

Assessment:                     

School-Assessed Coursework for this study consist of

  • An Application Task
  • Three Modelling or Problem Solving tasks

In addition there are two externally set examinations

Expected Skills:               

The ability to apply the skills taught in General Mathematics Units 1 & 2.

Special Course Commitments:

A CAS Calculator is required – (TI-Nspire recommended)

Mathematical Methods

It is the expectation that students will have successfully completed Year 10 Maths Methods before under this subject at Unit 1 & 2 . Selection criteria will also be applied to students wishing to undertake these classes. This will include consideration of previous assessments, sitting a selection examination and receiving a teacher recommendation.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:       

Units 1 & 2 provide an introductory study of simple elementary functions, algebra, calculus, probability and statistics and their applications in a variety of practical and theoretical contexts and prepares students for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.  It is also a pre-requisite for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4. Areas of study include ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, and ‘Probability and statistics’.  In undertaking this unit, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, graphs, differentiation and anti-differentiation with and without the use of technology. 

Assessment:                

  • Application tasks
  • Topic tests
  • Modelling and Problem Solving tasks
  • Semester Examinations

Unit 3 & 4 usually follows satisfactory completion of the Mathematical Methods Unit 1 & 2 course. It extend the study of simple elementary functions to include combinations of these functions, algebra, calculus, probability and statistics, and their applications in a variety of practical and theoretical contexts. They also provide background for further study in, for example, science, humanities, economics and medicine. Throughout Mathematical Methods 3 & 4 students continue to apply mathematical procedures and use technology to solve problems in routine and unfamiliar contexts.  Units 3 and 4 consist of the areas of study ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Algebra’ and ‘Probability and statistics’. Mathematics Methods 3 & 4 contains assumed knowledge from Mathematics Methods 1 & 2.

Assessment:                     

School-Assessed Coursework consists of

  • An Application Task
  • Two Problem Solving tasks

In addition there are two externally set examinations, one technology free and one technology enabled.

 

Expected Skills:               

Good problem-solving skills and the ability to perform algebraic operations (e.g. factorising, transposing, etc.). You are also expected to work very hard both in class and at home.  You will need good organisational skills to manage your time and workload.

Mathematics Methods 3 & 4 contains assumed knowledge from Mathematics Methods 1 & 2.

 

Special Course Commitments:

Students are required to purchase a CAS calculator. (TI-Nspire is recommended)

 

Specialist Mathematics

It is the expectation that students will have successfully completed Year 10 Maths Methods before undertaking Specialist Mathematics at Unit 1 & 2.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:       

Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 provide a course of study for students who wish to undertake an in-depth study of mathematics, with an emphasis on concepts, skills and processes related to mathematical structure, modelling, problem solving and reasoning. This study has a focus on interest in the discipline of mathematics in its own right and investigation of a broad range of applications, as well as development of a sound background for further studies in mathematics and mathematics related fields.

The areas of study for Units 1 and 2 of Specialist Mathematics are ‘Algebra and structure’, ‘Arithmetic and number’, ‘Discrete mathematics’, ‘Geometry, measurement and trigonometry’, ‘Graphs of linear and non-linear relations’ and ‘Statistics’.

Assessment:                      

  • Topic Tests
  • Application and Analysis tasks
  • Problem Solving and Modelling tasks
  • Semester Examinations

Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 extend content from Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 to include rational and other quotient functions as well as other advanced mathematics topics such as complex numbers, vectors, differential equations, mechanics and statistical inference. It consist of the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Vectors’, ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’. The course highlights mathematical structure, reasoning and applications across a range of modelling contexts. Students practise mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques and use them to solve standard problems; apply mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations which require investigative, modelling or problem-solving approaches and use technology appropriately and effectively to learn mathematics and apply it in different contexts.

Assessment:      

School-Assessed Coursework, includes

  • An Application Task
  • Two Modelling or Problem Solving tasks

In addition there are two externally set examinations, one technology free and one technology enabled.

 

Expected Skills:               

Good problem-solving skills and the ability to perform algebraic operations (e.g. factorising, transposing, etc.). You are expected to work very hard both in class and at home.  You will need good organisational skills to manage your time and workload.

Students preparing to study Specialist Mathematics 3 & 4 are expected to have completed Specialist Mathematic and Mathematical Methods in Units 1 & 2. These, taken in conjunction, provide a comprehensive preparation for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4.

Study of Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 assumes concurrent study or previous completion of Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

Special Course Commitments:

A CAS calculator is required. (TI-Nspire recommended)

VCE Performing Arts

Dance Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

Throughout the VCE Dance course, students will create and perform their own dance works as well as studying the dance works of others through performance and analysis. They will undertake systematic dance training to build physical skills and develop their ability to execute safely a diverse range of expressive body actions. Students develop and refine their choreographic skills by exploring personal and learnt movement vocabularies, and ways in which movement can be created and arranged to communicate the expressive intention of the dance-maker. They also study ways in which ideas are communicated through the skilled performance of their own and others’ dances. Students consider influences on the expressive intention and movement vocabulary of their own dances and also on works created by choreographers working in a range of styles, genres and traditions.

 

The units in VCE Dance share a similar structure, with Outcome 1 focusing on dance perspectives, Outcome 2 focusing on choreography and performance and Outcome 3 on learnt dance

Assessment:                    

This course uses the following forms of assessment:

  • Essays or reports
  • Multimedia presentations
  • Solo and group performances
  • Practical and theoretical exams

Prerequisites:                  

There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. It is recommended that students have three to four years dance and/or movement experience prior to the commencement of VCE Dance.

Expected Skills:               

Students should have the ability to:

  • develop and refine safe dance practices and a kinaesthetic awareness of the body
  • respond creatively to ideas, observations and explorations of movement to communicate an expressive intention
  • observe, experience and write about dance in an analytical, a critical and a reflective manner
  • understand influences on their own dance works and those created by other choreographers.

Special Course Commitments:

This subject is offered through our partnership with private dance provider INTENTION DANCE. Classes are run once a week at Wheelers Hill Secondary College in D01

  • Classes are held outside of regular timetabled classes. They take place on Wednesday afternoons during VET time (Units 1 & 2: 3.00pm – 6.30pm; Units 3 & 4: 1.00pm – 4.30pm)
  • As this course is run privately outside of regular timetabled classes, students have the option of studying VCE Dance as either an extra subject or as part of their regular class load
  • The special arrangements for this course attract a higher cost of $600 a year, which include and provide for all students’ course materials; excursions, incursions and workshops; guest teachers; performance fees; costume requirements; and INTENTION DANCE uniform (printed tee and hoodie). Payment is made directly to INTENTION DANCE and a variety of payment plans are available to minimise the financial inconvenience. Remittance information will be provided upon enrolment with INTENTION DANCE.
  • To enrol in this course, students elect the subject as normal through WHSC and student contact information will be given to INTENTION DANCE who will send out an enrolment package

Drama

Successful completion of Year 10 Theatre Studies and /or Drama is strongly recommended for students wishing to undertke this subject.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Unit 1

Students study three or more performance styles from a range of social, historical and cultural contexts. 

They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances that go beyond re-creation and/or representation of real life as it is lived. This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised solo and/or ensemble performance that includes real or imagined characters and is based on stimulus material that reflects personal, cultural and/or community experiences and stories. This unit also involves analysis of a student’s own performance work and a work by professional drama performers. 

Students apply play-making techniques to shape and give meaning to their performance. They manipulate expressive and performance skills in the creation and presentation of characters, and develop awareness and understanding of how characters are portrayed in a range of performance styles. They document the processes they use as they explore a range of stimulus material, and experiment with production areas, dramatic elements, conventions and performance styles. 

Unit 2

In this unit students study aspects of Australian identity evident in contemporary drama practice. This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance. 

Students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context. 

They examine selected performance styles and explore the associated conventions. Students 

further develop their knowledge of the conventions of transformation of character, time and place, the application of symbol, and how these conventions may be manipulated to create meaning in performance and the use of dramatic elements and production areas. 

Students analyse their own performance work as well as undertaking an analysis of a performance of an Australian work, where possible, by professional actors.  

Unit 3

In this unit students explore the work of drama practitioners and draw on contemporary practice as they devise ensemble performance work. Students explore performance styles and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and/or traditional contexts. They work collaboratively to devise, develop and present an ensemble performance.  

Throughout development of the work they experiment with transformation of character, 

time and place, and application of symbol. Students devise and shape their work to communicate meaning or to have a specific impact on their audience. In addition, students document and evaluate stages involved in the creation, development and presentation of the ensemble performance. 

Students analyse and evaluate a professional drama performance selected from the prescribed VCE Drama Unit 3 Playlist published annually on the VCAA website. 

Unit 4

In this area of study students explore, and develop skills in, play-making techniques in the development of a short solo performance. They demonstrate application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place. Teachers provide stimulus material appropriate to the size of the task, such as a person, an event, an issue, a place, an image, one word, a definition, a quotation, lyrics, a sound or an icon. 

Students prepare for the task of devising a short solo performance by exploring, experimenting with and trialing processes they will employ in developing their extended solo performance for Outcome 2. They focus themselves for applying symbol and transforming character, time and place. The focus of the performance should be on acting. Students may use production areas such as costume, make-up, objects, props or mask, to assist in application of symbol or transformations. Students develop a short statement that identifies the techniques of this performance. They then present this solo performance in an informal setting such as in a classroom. The stimulus material the student uses in this area of study must be different from the stimulus material used in completing Outcomes 2 and 3, and should not be selected from the prescribed structures published for the current year in the VCE Drama Solo Performance Examination. 

Outcomes 2 and 3 involves the preparation, creation and presentation of a devised solo performances, for an externally assessed performance.  

 

Assessment Tasks: 

Unit 1/2 

SAC 1 (Outcome 1) – Class Notes, workshops and observations made during the creation of a solo/ensemble performance 

SAC 2 (Outcome 2) – Performance of a solo or ensemble performance 

SAC 3 (Outcome 3) – Self performance evaluation, response to structured questions/oral presentation 

SAC 4 (Outcome 4) – performance analysis, response to structured questions in response to professional theatre performance 

 

Unit 3 

SAC 1 (Outcome 1) – Development and presentation of characters within a devised ensemble performance. Each student to have 5 – 8 minutes of primary focus performance time in work. 

SAC 2 (Outcome 2) – Analysis of the development and performance of characters in the ensemble developed in Outcome 1. (Oral presentation OR Response to Structured Questions) 

SAC 3 (Outcome 3) – performance analysis, response to structured questions in response to professional theatre performance (Professional Performance from Unit 3 Playlist) 

Unit 4 

SAC 1 (Outcome 1) – Mini solo demonstration, based on stimulus material supplied by classroom teacher AND oral or written statement, describing techniques used in demonstration.   

SAC 2 (Outcome 2) – Preparation and development of a solo performance, based on the VCAA prescribed structures. (Externally assessed)  

SAC 3 (Outcome 3) – Self performance evaluation, response to structured questions, of solo performance devised for Outcome 2.  

 

Proposed topics: 

The following topics are relevant and appear throughout all Units of VCE Drama 

  • Understanding Performance Styles –Epic, Poor, Cruelty, Absurd, Realism etc 

  • Playmaking techniques – how to create a performance based on stimulus material 

  • Conventions of performance – application of symbol, transformation of time, place and character.  

  • Dramatic Elements and Performance Skills. 

  • Creating for an audience – learning how to create meaning for an audience through performance techniques 

Music Performance

Successful completion of Year 10 Music is highly recommended for students wishing to undertake this subject.  A minimum of one year of private instrumental lessons is also recommended for students

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

This study enables students to:

  • develop and practise musicianship
  • perform, compose, arrange and improvise music from diverse styles and traditions
  • engage with diverse music genres, styles, contexts and practices
  • communicate understanding of cultural, stylistic, aesthetic and expressive qualities and characteristics of music
  • explore and expand personal music interests, knowledge and experiences
  • use imagination, creativity and personal and social skills in music making
  • access pathways for further education, training and employment in music
  • use electronic and digital technologies in making and sharing music and communicating ideas about music
  • participate in life-long music learning and the musical life of their community.

Assessment:                     

The course uses the following assessment methods:

  • Performance Examinations
  • School Assessed Coursework (e.g. tests, folios, multimedia presentations).
  • Aural and Written Examinations

Expected Skills:               

The student must be able to:

  • Develop skills on a given instrument/voice for rehearsals and performances for a wide range of purposes/audiences;
  • Work within the given ensemble format to develop a repertoire of works across musical styles appropriate to the ensemble;
  • Critically analyze professional and class-based performance work in written and oral form.

Special Course Commitments:  

All Students are expected to undertake private tuition on their given instrument/voice either through the College Instrumental Music program or private teacher/music school.  Students may be asked to perform at College Functions (e.g. Open Night, Assemblies and College Production) and are required to attend at least one professional musical performance/concert outside of school for a concert review as part of the course design.

Theatre Studies

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

This study enables students to:

•    acquire knowledge of theatre, including its styles, traditions, purposes and audiences

•    interpret playscripts through engagement in the production process

•    creatively and imaginatively explore and experiment with theatrical possibilities

•    develop and apply stagecraft knowledge and skills to interpret playscripts

•    develop an understanding of themselves as theatre makers and practitioners

•    develop an appreciation of theatre and its significance as an art form

•    apply skills of theatrical analysis and evaluation to their own production work and that of others

•    participate in the theatrical life of their community.

The study is made up of two:

  • Unit 1: Pre-modern Theatre
  • Unit 2: Modern Theatre
  • Unit 3: Playscript Interpretation
  • Unit 4: Performance Interpretation

Assessment:                    

Consists of the following:

  • Performances - Ensemble and Solo
  • Folios of Production Processes and Stagecraft which can include multimedia presentations
  • Exams - Written and Performance
  • Performance analyses
  • Unit 3&4 students will be externally examined for monologue interpretation

Expected Skills:               

Students are to demonstrate performance skills and critically analyse production elements and performances.

 

Special Course Commitments:

Students are required to attend performances outside school hours. This will be an extra cost to subject fees, dependant on the show, location and timing. 

VCE Science

Biology

A satisfactory completion of Year 10 Science is recommended as a prerequisite for Year 11 Biology.  A satisfactory result in Unit 1 and 2 Biology is recommended as a prerequisite for Unit 3 and 4 Biology. 

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:       

Biology is a diverse and evolving science discipline that seeks to understand and explore the nature of life, past and present. The study explores the dynamic relationships between organisms and their interactions with the non-living environment. It also explores the processes of life, from the molecular world of the cell to that of the whole organism, that maintain life and ensure its continuity.

Unit 1: How do living things stay alive?

Students are introduced to some of the challenges to an organism in sustaining life. Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single celled to the multicellular organism, and the requirements for sustaining cellular processes in terms of inputs and outputs.  A student practical investigation related to the survival of an organism or species is undertaken in Area of Study 3. 

Unit 2: How is continuity of life maintained?

Students focus on cell reproduction and the transmission of biological information from generation to generation. A student-directed research investigation into, and communication of, an issue related to genetics and/or reproductive science is to be undertaken in Area of Study 3. The investigation draws on content from Area of Study 1 and/or Area of Study 2.

Unit 3: Signatures of Life

Students investigate the workings of the cell from several perspectives. They explore the importance of the insolubility of the plasma membrane in water and its differential permeability to specific solutes in defining the cell, its internal spaces and the control of the movement of molecules and ions in and out of such spaces.

Unit 4: Continuity and Change

Students consider the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. They investigate the relatedness between species and the impact of various change events on a population’s gene pool. 

Assessment:                 

For Unit 1 & 2 of the course, assessment is school-based and includes a selection of the following methods of assessment:

  • A report of a field work activity
  • Annotations of practical work folio of activities or investigations
  • A bioinformatics exercise
  • Media response
  • Data analysis
  • Problem solving involving biological concepts, skills and/ or issues
  • A reflective journal/ blog
  • Tests/ examinations

For Unit 3 & 4 of the course, assessment includes School-assessed Coursework (SACs) specified in the VCE study design and external assessment. These include:

  • Ongoing reports on a range of practical activities
  • Response to issues
  • Data analysis
  • Topic tests
  • A structured scientific poster according to the VCAA template
  • End of year exam

Expected Skills :

  • The ability to apply skills and knowledge taught in science and Biology in year 10 by understanding and answering test and exam questions to a high level.
  • The ability to research information, consider questions, design experiments, report findings from experiments and reflect on the overall learning experience.

Chemistry

A satisfactory completion of Year 10 Essential Science is recommended as a prerequisite for Year 11 Chemistry.  A satisfactory result in Unit 1 and 2 Chemistry is recommended as prerequisite for Unit 3 and 4 Chemistry.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:

Chemistry is a key science in explaining the workings of our universe through an understanding of the properties and interaction of substances that make up matter. Chemistry is used to explain natural phenomena at the molecular level, as well as create new materials such as medicines and polymers.  Students will learn to use chemical knowledge and scientific arguments in their everyday lives and to evaluate and debate important contemporary issues such as the future of our environment and its management.

Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained?

The development and use of materials for specific purposes is an important human endeavour. In this unit students investigate the chemical properties and practical applications of a range of materials including metals, crystals, polymers, nanomaterials and giant lattices. They explore and explain the relationships between properties, structure and bonding forces within and between particles that vary in size from the visible through to nanoparticles, molecules and atoms. Students are introduced to quantitative concepts in chemistry.

Unit 2: What makes water such a unique chemical?

Water is the most widely used solvent on Earth. In this unit students explore the physical and chemical properties of water, the reactions that occur in water and various methods of water analysis. Students examine the structure and bonding within and between water molecules in order to investigate solubility, concentration, pH and reactions in water including precipitation, acid-base and redox. They are introduced to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques and instrumental procedures analysis, and apply these to determine concentrations of different species in water samples, including chemical contaminants. Students explore the solvent properties of water in a variety of contexts and analyse selected issues associated with substances dissolved in water.

Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?

The global demand for energy and materials is increasing with world population growth. In this unit students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies, renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment.

Students compare and evaluate different chemical energy resources, including fossil fuels, biofuels, galvanic cells and fuel cells. They investigate the combustion of fuels, including the energy transformations involved, the use of stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products involved in the reactions, and calculations of the amounts of energy released and their representations. Students consider the purpose, design and operating principles of galvanic cells, fuel cells and electrolytic cells. In this context they use the electrochemical series to predict and write half and overall redox equations, and apply Faraday’s laws to calculate quantities in electrolytic reactions.

Students analyse manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their reaction rates and extent. They investigate and apply the equilibrium law to predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical processes. They use the language and conventions of chemistry including symbols, units, chemical formulas and equations to represent and explain observations and data collected from experiments, and to discuss chemical phenomena.

Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?

The carbon atom has unique characteristics that explain the diversity and number of organic compounds that not only constitute living tissues but are also found in the fuels, foods, medicines and many of the materials we use in everyday life. In this unit students investigate the structural features, bonding, typical reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds including those found in food. Students study the ways in which organic structures are represented and named. They process data from instrumental analyses of organic compounds to confirm or deduce organic structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic chemicals in mixtures. Students consider the nature of the reactions involved to predict the products of reaction pathways and to design pathways to produce particular compounds from given starting materials. Students investigate key food molecules through an exploration of their chemical structures, the hydrolytic reactions in which they are broken down and the condensation reactions in which they are rebuilt to form new molecules. In this context the role of enzymes and coenzymes in facilitating chemical reactions is explored. Students use calorimetry as an investigative tool to determine the energy released in the combustion of foods.

Assessment:              

This course may use the following methods of Assessment:

  •  Practical work/Extended experimental investigations
  •  A response to stimulus material
  •  A presentation of a new material/new use of an existing material/green chemistry
  •  Annotated reports
  •  Tests
  •  Examinations         

Expected Skills:        

The ability to read, analyse and apply information from a complex text.

The ability to design practical activities and carry them out appropriately.

Physics

A satisfactory completion of Year 10 Essential Science 1 and 2 is recommended as a prerequisite for Year 11 Physics.  A satisfactory result in Unit 1 and 2 Physics is recommended as a prerequisite for Unit 3 and 4 Physics.  Students are also strongly encouraged to enrol in Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics at each year level.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:   

Physics seeks to understand and explain the physical world. It uses models and ideas to make sense of the world, which are sometimes challenged as new knowledge develops. VCE Physics provides students with opportunities to explore questions related to the natural and constructed world. The study provides a contextual approach to exploring selected areas within the discipline including atomic physics, electricity, fields, mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum physics and waves.

Unit 1: What ideas explain the physical world? 

This unit has three prescribed areas of study: “Thermodynamics” in which students study the principles related to heating processes, including concepts of temperature, energy and work and examine the environmental impacts of Earth’s thermal systems and human activities; “Electric Circuits” in which students develop conceptual models to analyse electrical phenomena and undertake practical investigations of circuit components; and “What is matter?” in which students explore the nature of matter, and consider the origins of atoms, time and space.

Unit 2: What do experiments reveal about the physical world?

This unit has one prescribed areas of study, “Motion”, in which students observe motion and explore the effects of forces on motion, analyse motion and apply mathematical models during experimental investigations of motion; and an options study to be selected from “How do forces act on the human body?”, “How can AC electricity charge a DC device?”, “How do heavy things fly?”, “How do fusion and fission compare as viable nuclear energy power sources?”, “How can human vision be enhanced?”, “How do instruments make music?”, “How can performance in ball sports be improved?”

Unit 3: How do fields explain motion and electricity?

In this unit students complete three areas of study. “How do things move without contact?” examines the similarities and differences between three fields: gravitational, electric and magnetic. They investigate how concepts related to field models can be applied to construct motors, maintain satellite orbits and to accelerate particles. “How are fields used to move electrical energy?” uses empirical evidence and models of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic effects to explain how electricity is produced and delivered to homes. “How fast can things go?” uses Newton’s laws of motion to analyse relative motion, circular motion and projectile motion. It also explores how Einstein’s theory of special relativity allows us to predict motion at very high speeds.

Unit 4: How can two contradictory models explain both light and matter?

Through the first two areas of study, this unit lets students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. They examine how the concept of the wave is used to explain the nature of light and explore its limitations in describing light behaviour. Students further investigate light by using a particle model to explain its behaviour. A wave model is also used to explain the behaviour of matter which enables students to consider the relationship between light and matter.

For the third area of study, “Practical Investigation”, a student-designed practical investigation related to waves, fields or motion is undertaken either during Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Units 3 and 4. The investigation relates to knowledge and skills developed across Units 3 and 4 and is undertaken by the student through practical work. Results are communicated in a scientific poster format according to the template provided by VCAA.

Assessment:                 

For Unit 1 & 2 of the course, assessment is school-based and includes a selection of the following methods of Assessment:

  • Topic tests and Semester Examinations
  • Data analysis
  • Design, development, testing and evaluation of a device
  • An explanation of the operation of a device
  • A report of a selected physics phenomenon
  • A modelling activity
  • Summary report of practical investigations

In addition for the Investigation Outcome in Unit 2 students must complete a report of a practical investigation (student-designed or adapted) using a scientific poster format.

 

For Unit 3 & 4 School-assessed Coursework (SACs) will consist of a number of specified tasks . These include:

  • A summary report of selected practical activities from the student’s log book
  • A report on the design, building, testing and evaluation of a device
  • A data analysis task
  • Test(s) (short answer and extended response)

For the Investigation Outcome in Unit 4 students must complete a structured scientific poster according to VCAA template of the student-designed investigation

 

There is also an external exam for Units 3 & 4

 

Expected Skills             

The ability to apply skills taught in science/ physics the year before and to be able to carry out practical investigations and prepare written reports.  Strong mathematical skills in applying formulae, graph drawing and interpretation and problem solving are expected.

Psychology

A satisfactory completion of Year 10 Essential Science is recommended as a prerequisite for Year 11 Psychology.  A satisfactory result in Unit 1 and 2 Psychology is recommended as prerequisite for Unit 3 and 4 Psychology.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:  

Psychology is the scientific study of mental processes and behaviour in humans. Biological, behavioural, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives inform the way psychologists approach their research into the human condition.  A variety of thinking and research approaches used in psychology are introduced to provide a broad perspective of psychology as a science. 

Unit 1: How are Behaviour and Mental Processes Shaped?

In this unit students investigate the structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system. Students explore brain plasticity and the influence that brain damage may have on a person’s psychological functioning.  They consider the complex nature of psychological development, including situations where psychological development may not occur as expected.  Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary studies have made to an understanding of the human brain and its functions, and to the development of different psychological models and theories used to predict and explain the development of thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

Unit 2: How do External Factors Influence Behaviours and Mental Processes?  

A person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours are influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors.  In this unit students investigate how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted.  They evaluate the role social cognition plays in a person’s attitudes, perception of themselves and relationships with others.  Students explore a variety of factors and contexts that can influence the behaviour of an individual and groups.  They examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of human perception and why individuals and groups behave in specific ways.

Unit 3: How does Experience Affect Behaviour and Mental Processes?

The nervous system influences behaviour and the way people experience the world.  In this unit students examine both macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system to explain how the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the world around them.  They explore how stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress.  Students investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed behaviours.  They consider the limitations and fallibility of memory and how memory can be improved.  Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system, and to the understanding of biological, psychological and social factors that influence learning and memory.

Unit 4: How is Wellbeing Developed and Maintained?

Consciousness and mental health are two of many psychological constructs that can be explored by studying the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour.  In this unit students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning.  Students explore the concept of a mental health continuum and apply a biopsychosocial approach, as a scientific model, to analyse mental health and disorder.  They use specific phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors.  Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of consciousness, including sleep, and the development of an individual’s mental functioning and wellbeing.

 

Assessment:                 

This course uses the following methods of assessment:

  • Annotated folio of practical activities
  • Media response
  • Annotated poster
  • Student directed research investigation
  • Evaluation of research
  • Tests
  • Examinations

Expected Skills:           

The ability to read, analyse and apply information from complex texts.

VCE Technology

Food Studies

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course description:

VCE Food Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the exploration of food, with an emphasis on extending food knowledge and skills and building individual pathways to health and wellbeing through the application of practical food skills. VCE Food Studies provides a framework for informed and confident food selection and food preparation within today’s complex architecture of influences and choices. Students explore food from a wide range of perspectives. They study past and present patterns of eating, Australian and global food production systems and the many physical and social functions and roles of food. They research economic, environmental and ethical dimensions of food and critically evaluate information, marketing messages and new trends. Practical work is integral to Food Studies and includes cooking, demonstrations, creating and responding to design briefs, dietary analysis, food sampling and taste-testing, sensory analysis and product analysis

The study is made up of four units.

Unit 1: Food origins 

Unit 2: Food makers 

Unit 3: Food in daily life

Unit 4: Food issues, challenges and futures 

Assessment:

Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework: 30 per cent 

Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework: 30 per cent

End-of-year examination: 40 per cent.

Expected Skills:

Basic knowledge and interest in food preparation and hospitality.

Computing/Informatics

It is an advantage to study Year 9 Digital Technologies, Year 10 Computing or Design, coding and robotics.

It is highly recommended that students successfully complete Units 1 & 2 before undertaking

Units 3 & 4.        

Units 1 & 2 Applied Computing, Units 3 & 4 Data Analytics

Course Description:       

VCE Computing focuses on the application of a problem-solving methodology, and strategies and techniques for managing information systems in a range of contexts, to create digital solutions that meet specific needs. The study examines the attributes of each component of an information system including people, processes, data and digital systems (hardware, software, networks), and how their interrelationships affect the types and quality of digital solutions.

 

Unit 1 & 2: Applied Computing

In Unit 1 students are introduced to the stages of the problem-solving methodology. Students focus on how data can be used within software tools such as databases and spreadsheets to create data visualisations, and the use of programming languages to develop working software solutions.

In Unit 2 students focus on developing innovative solutions to needs or opportunities that they have identified, and propose strategies for reducing security risks to data and information in a networked environment.

 

Unit 3 & 4: Data Analytics

In Unit 3 students apply the problem-solving methodology to identify and extract data through the use of software tools such as database, spreadsheet and data visualisation software to create data visualisations or infographics. Students develop an understanding
of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology.

In Unit 4 students focus on determining the findings of a research question by developing infographics or dynamic data visualisations based on large complex data sets and on the security strategies used by an organisation to protect data and information from threats.

Assessment:                     

Consists of the following:

  • Designing and developing solutions in response to design briefs using digital systems and  techniques
  • Written reports
  • Visual and/or oral presentations
  • Tests and Examinations

Expected Skills:               

Basic interest, skills and knowledge in computing/digital technology.  Sound design, thinking and problem-solving skills.

Product Design and Technology

For students wishing to undertakethis subject, Year 9 and 10 Woodwork and/or Material Studies is recommended

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

VCE Product Design and Technology requires students to develop effective design practice.  The design process involves identification of a real need that is then articulated in a design brief.  The need is investigated and informed by research to aid the development of solutions that take the form of physical, three-dimensional functional products.  Development of these solutions requires the application of technology and a variety of cognitive and physical skills, including creative design thinking, drawing and computer-aided design, testing processes and materials, planning, construction, fabrication and evaluation.  In VCE Product Design and Technology students assume the role of a designer-maker.  In adopting this role, they acquire and apply knowledge of factors that influence design.

Unit 1: Product re-design and sustainability

This unit focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with consideration of the materials used and issues of sustainability.

Unit 2: Collaborative design

In this unit students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product.  They focus on factors including: human needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a design solution.

Unit 3: Applying the product design process

In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that meets the needs and expectations of a client and/or an end-user, developed through a design process and influenced by a range of complex factors.

Unit 4: Product development and evaluation

In this unit students learn that evaluations are made at various points of product design, development and production. In the role of designer, students judge the suitability and viability of design ideas and options referring to the design brief and evaluation criteria in collaboration with a client and/or an end-user.  Comparisons between similar products help to judge the success of a product in relation to a range of product design factors.  The environmental, economic and social impact of products throughout their life cycle can be analysed and evaluated with reference to the product design factors.

Assessment:              

Assessment tasks may consist of the following:

  • Designing and developing solutions in response to design briefs using materials and production processes.
  • Written Reports
  • Tests 
  • Examination

Expected Skills:        

Basic knowledge and interest in woodwork and/or metalwork.  It is highly recommended that students successfully complete Units 1 & 2 before undertaking Units 3 & 4.

 

VCE Digital Technology

Applied Computing/Data Analytics

It is an advantage to study Year 9 Digital Technologies, Year 10 Computing or Design, coding and robotics.

It is highly recommended that students successfully complete Units 1 & 2 before undertaking

Units 3 & 4.        

Units 1 & 2 Applied Computing, Units 3 & 4 Data Analytics

Course Description:       

VCE Computing focuses on the application of a problem-solving methodology, and strategies and techniques for managing information systems in a range of contexts, to create digital solutions that meet specific needs. The study examines the attributes of each component of an information system including people, processes, data and digital systems (hardware, software, networks), and how their interrelationships affect the types and quality of digital solutions.

 

Unit 1 & 2: Applied Computing

In Unit 1 students are introduced to the stages of the problem-solving methodology. Students focus on how data can be used within software tools such as databases and spreadsheets to create data visualisations, and the use of programming languages to develop working software solutions.

In Unit 2 students focus on developing innovative solutions to needs or opportunities that they have identified, and propose strategies for reducing security risks to data and information in a networked environment.

 

Unit 3 & 4: Data Analytics

In Unit 3 students apply the problem-solving methodology to identify and extract data through the use of software tools such as database, spreadsheet and data visualisation software to create data visualisations or infographics. Students develop an understanding
of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology.

In Unit 4 students focus on determining the findings of a research question by developing infographics or dynamic data visualisations based on large complex data sets and on the security strategies used by an organisation to protect data and information from threats.

Assessment:                     

Consists of the following:

  • Designing and developing solutions in response to design briefs using digital systems and  techniques
  • Written reports
  • Visual and/or oral presentations
  • Tests and Examinations

Expected Skills:               

Basic interest, skills and knowledge in computing/digital technology.  Sound design, thinking and problem-solving skills.

VCE Visual Arts

Studio Arts

It is recommended that students have successfully completed at least one of the following subjects:

Year 9/10 Art, Ceramics, Photography or Media. 

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

This study enables students to express themselves creatively through art making and come to understand how to support and sustain their art practice. Students develop an individual studio process, and practice and refine specialised skills appropriate to particular art forms and media selected for art making. They analyse and draw inspiration from the ways in which artists apply studio processes in the production of their individual artworks, whilst developing an understanding of historical and cultural contexts in the production and analysis of artworks. Students develop and apply skills in visual analysis, including the use of appropriate terminology in relation to their own artwork and artists studied. They extend their understanding of the roles and methods involved in the presentation of artworks in a range of gallery and exhibition spaces and develop an understanding of professional art practices related to the exhibition of artworks to an audience, including the roles and methods involved in the presentation of artworks in a range of gallery and exhibition spaces.

The themes covered in each unit are:

Unit 1: Studio inspiration and techniques

Unit 2: Studio exploration and concepts

Unit 3: Studio practices and processes

Unit 4: Studio practice and art industry contexts

 

Assessment:                    

This course uses the following forms of assessment:

  • Essays or Reports
  • Analytical Tasks
  • Folio of Visual Artworks
  • Exams

Expected Skills:               

The students must be able to demonstrate and ability to use art media and techniques, research skills and the ability to interpret and compare artworks. This includes:

  • Generating ideas and develop individual subject matter from sources of inspiration, observations, experiences and artistic influences
  • Producing and evaluate finished artworks
  • Investigating, developing and refining materials and techniques appropriate to art making in a range of art forms
  • Using appropriate terminology in discussion and comparison of artist practices, influences and artworks
  • Using an exploration proposal to frame an individual studio process

 

Special Course Commitments:

Art gallery excursions and extra-curricular folio classes.

Visual Communication and Design

Successful completion of Year 9/10 Visual Communication and Design elective is recommended.

Units 1, 2, 3 & 4

Course Description:      

This study enables students to develop and apply drawing skills using a range of techniques to make their design thinking visible. Students develop a wide range of skills in selecting and applying media, materials, and manual and digital methods to suit design purposes, whilst following a design process to create visual communications. Students will complete a series of theoretical components in order to develop their understanding of how key visual communication design elements, design principles, media, materials, and manual and digital methods contribute to the creation of their own and existing designers visual language.  They will develop a capacity to undertake ongoing design thinking while conceiving, communicating and presenting ideas. These ideas will be be supported through an understanding of how historical, social, cultural, environmental, legal, ethical and contemporary factors influence visual communications.

The study is made up of four units.

  • Unit 1: Introduction to visual communication design
  • Unit 2: Applications of visual communication within design fields
  • Unit 3: Visual communication design practices
  • Unit 4: Visual communication design development, evaluation and presentation

Assessment:                    

The course uses the following assessment methods:

  • Design Briefs
  • Folios of drawings, ideas and concepts using manual and/or digital methods
  • Written and/or annotated visual reports
  • Oral and visual presentations
  • Exams

Expected Skills:               

The student must be able to:

  • Draw accurately from observation, develop rendering skills and use a variety of media effectively;
  • Use instrumental drawing to produce orthogonal, paraline and perspective views of objects;
  • Analyse and research skills developed as part of essay writing;
  • Explain the design thinking behind each of the visual communication presentations;
  • Use appropriate terminology
  • Devise and deliver a pitch that supports the presentation of final visual communications.

Special Course Commitments:  

Folio work will require preparatory work outside of the classroom. External excursions are also required to obtain observations of industry practices. 

VCE Subject Charges

Unit 1 - 4 Subject Charges

Learning Area

Studies

Cost

 

 

1

2

3

4

English

English

$70

$70

$130

 

English as an Alternative Language (EAL)

$70

$70

$130

 

Literature

$70

$70

$130

Health and Physical Education

Physical Education

$60

$60

$110

 

Health and Human Development

$60

$60

$110

Humanities

Accounting

$60

$60

$110

 

Business Management

$60

$60

$110

 

History – Twentieth Century History

$60

$60

NA

NA

 

History - Revolutions

NA

NA

$110

 

Legal Studies

$60

$60

$110

Mathematics

Further Mathematics

NA

NA

$110

 

General Mathematics

$60

$60

NA

NA

 

Mathematical Methods

$60

$60

$110

 

Specialist Mathematics

$60

$60

$110

Performing Arts

Dance

$60

$60

$110

 

Drama

$60

$60

$110

 

Music Performance

$60

$60

$110

 

Theatre Studies

$60

$60

$110

Science

Biology

$65

$65

$120

 

Chemistry

$65

$65

$120

 

Physics

$65

$65

$120

 

Psychology

$60

$60

$110

Technology

Computing

$60

$60

N/A

 

Informatics

NA

NA

$110

 

 Product Design and Technology     

$115                 

$130

 

Food Studies

$190                 

$260

Visual Arts                                    

Studio Arts

$150                 

$170

 

Visual Communication and Design

$95                   

$105

Please note, charges may be adjusted for 2020 following review by School Council.

Advanced Studies

Advanced Studies

For an increasing number of students, Year 10 enables them to enrol in a VCE unit and thereby gain an invaluable understanding of the processes and procedures that are followed in the VCE.  Effectively this allows them to complete a three-year VCE and offers the possibility of completing some Unit 3 and 4 studies in Year 11 and University Enhancement studies in Year 12.

 

Advanced Studies can only be selected from the following list:

  • English Literature Unit 1 & 2
  • General Maths Unit 1 & 2
  • Biology Unit 1 & 2
  • Psychology Unit 1 & 2
  • Business Management Unit 1 & 2
  • Twentieth Century History Unit 1 & 2
  • Legal Studies Unit 1 & 2
  • Health & Human Dev Unit 1 & 2
  • Physical Education Unit 1 & 2
  • Computing Unit 1 & 2
  • Dance Unit 1 & 2
  • Music Performance Unit 1 & 2
  • Studio Arts Unit 1 & 2
  • Theatre Studies Unit 1 & 2
  • Visual Communication Unit 1 & 2

 

Students wishing to apply for an advanced study in 2020 need to fill in the relevant form which can be found on Compass under School Documentation. Please note that the signature of  a parent/guardian and two teachers is required. The success of the application is dependent upon a number of factors including subject availability, etc. It is advised that you select a full course appropriate to your level  in addition to any application for an advanced study.

VET & Alternative Pathways

VET in Schools Program

Students can select to undertake a Vocational Education and Training (VET) program as part of a VCE or VCAL program.  These programs include VET in Schools, School Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships and pre-apprenticeships. They are designed to:

  • provide a vocational qualification as well as a senior secondary certificate
  • provide courses that are motivating and engaging for many young people
  • expand opportunities and pathways for senior secondary students
  • link schools to industry and training providers
  • help meet industry needs
  • prepare young people for the workplace of the future

VET programs are usually completed over two years with a total of 4 units of study.  Some VET studies have a study score and therefore can contribute towards the student’s primary four while others offer an increment towards student’s ATAR (10% of the average of the primary four scaled studies).  VET Programs can either be delivered at a TAFE or at another school.  Students participating in VET programs have the opportunity to work in a related industry setting, through a Work Placement, while completing their VET certificate.  This is a compulsory requirement in most VET programs.

 

At Wheelers Hill Secondary College year 11 students can choose a VET subject as part of their six subjects or have VET as an extra subject.  In year 12 students undertake 5 subjects (including VET) as long as the VET subject provides an ATAR contribution.  

 

Wheelers Hill Secondary College is a member of two VET Program providers – Mullum VET Cluster and Inner Melbourne VET Cluster.  Students wishing to undertake a VET subject must choose their VET program from one of these providers.  Please note that as these programs do not form part of the school curriculum additional costs will apply. 

 

VET programs include studies in areas such as –

Acting, Allied Health Assistance, Animal Studies, Applied Fashion Design & Technology, Automotive Studies (general), Paint & Panel, Aviation, Beauty, Building & Construction – Bricklaying or Carpentry, Business, CISCO, Civil Construction, Community Services, Dance, Design Fundamentals, Early Childhood Education & Care, Electrotechnology, Engineering Studies, Equine Studies, Events, Furniture Making, Horticulture, Dual Program: Hospitality & Kitchen Operations, IT, Interior Decoration Retails Services, Justice, Laboratory Skills, Landscaping, Make-up, Music Industry (Performance or Sound Production), Music Instrument Making, Plumbing, Salon Assistant, Screen & Media (Broadcasting or Games Design), Sport & Recreation, Visual Arts

 

For further program details please visit –

 

Mullum VET Cluster (courses located via 'programs offered' button) and

Inner Melbourne VET Cluster (courses located in drop down menu in Course Finder on home page)

 

Student Selection Criteria:

1. Evidence of ability to complete the course, based on:

Your previous education and training

Your paid or unpaid work experience

Your life and community experience

 

2. Demonstrated relevance of the course:

Relevance of course to your career plans and goals

Knowledge of the career area

 

3. Other factors relating to any previous disadvantages that may be taken into account in the selection process

Wheelers Hill Secondary College Senior School Handbook 2020