the Nor'Wester

09 August 2019
Issue Fourteen
upcoming events
assistant principal's message
school life
oshc & sprout
school council
community
Brunswick North West Primary School
93864624
Culloden Street
Brunswick West, VIC, 3055
AU

upcoming events

term 3, 2019

 

10.08.2019 - Winter Magic Market (BNW 90th Birthday Celebration)

                              (please note date change from printed school calendar)

12.08.2019 - F-2 Swimming commences (finishing 22.08.2019)

13.08.2019 - Family Information Evening: preparing for school camp

13.08.2019 - Tuning in to Teens (7-9pm MPR)

14.08.2019 - Finance Committee

15.08.2019 - School Council

17.08.2019 - Indonesian Independence Day

20.08.2019 - CET Meeting

21.08.2019 - Grade 3/4  camp departs

23.08.2019 - Grade 3/4 camp returns

26.08.2019 - Book Week (Monday - Friday) 

30.08.2019 - Spring Family Day

                           - Plant & Produce Market (Grade 3 families)

02.09.2019 - OSHC Committee

                           - B&G Committee

03.09.2019 - Education Committee

06.09.2019 - Divisional Athletics

10.09.2019 - Grade 2 Sleepover #1 (half cohort)

11.09.2019 - Finance Committee

12.09.2019 - School Council

14.09.2019 - Garden Group’s Spring-A-Ding-Ding! Fundraiser

17.09.2019 - Grade 2 Sleepover #2 (half cohort)

20.09.2019 - End of Term BBQ

                          - Term 3 concludes

 

volunteering @ BNW

We pride ourselves for our sense of belonging as it is beneficial for everyone. Family involvement in school strengthens our young people's connection to their education, it demonstrates the community connection many families choose our school for and helps us provide the best educational program and environment possible. In an attempt to better communicate with those interested in volunteering, the school is trying to build a volunteer register. We would love all family members to complete this short survey to help us collect this information. All information will be kept private and no one will be asked to commit to any volunteer work in the survey. 

There are so many different ways to become involved in your child's education and we love it when you want to get involved, but we must remind all family members that Working with Children Check cards are required by law.

 

 

wmm

 

assistant principal's message

dear families 

Wow! I heard it was good, it was better than good, it was brilliant!!! The Tuning into Teens session that I attended last Tuesday night, provided some practical and very supportive insights into adolescence and how best to parent them.

That’s no small feat! As a parent now of young adults, I certainly remember my trepidation while watching them during primary school, being fearful that we’d lose our loving and adoring little beings. My husband, Michael and I, always joked that we’d move out during the teenage years, but would weekly post food vouchers under the front door. Such was the worry of what tests our children would present.

Happily, I ended up mostly enjoying these years, I simply loved watching them grow into the people they now are! Much to my surprise, I began being an advocate for teenagers, especially teenage boys, as I grew concerned about all the negative media about them.

 

As Dr Christiane Kehoe, the presenter and co-author of Tuning Into Teens, so succinctly said on Tuesday night, we were ‘fired as managers’, and humbly accepted being rehired as consultants! I’m sure that many of you now are trying on your new consultants clothes!

During the evening Christiane provided some succinct information about Anxiety and Anxiety Disorder. She introduced us to current anxiety theories, linking these to how emotion coaching helps.

The importance of naming the emotion and sitting with it with your child was clear. At school, the learning pit, is an opportunty for children to explore feelings of potentially being overwhelmed, while working out ways of solving achieving their goal. Restorative justice conversations, in which children acknowledge their part of a problem, working towards restoring the relationships, also helps them build life-long interpersonal skills. 

 

The part of the evening where we all squirmed a bit was when Christiane introduced Emotion Dismissing. I challenge you all to read the slide and think of a time when you’ve done this! If you are like me, it won’t be difficult at all.

I though Christiane’s advice to flip the but was great, e.g. I have to… but then I can…

 

So our challenge is rather than be emotionally dismissive, is to be an Emotion Coach.

 

A simple, and in no way perfect example of Emotion Coaching was today, when I was with a very upset student.

As often happens, I was busy at the time, and it was nearly the end of the school day, so time was limited. Hearing this child’s distress it was clear that I needed to reprioritise my time and support her. Calmly I sat on the floor near her, simply listening, after a little while, I

The importance of naming the emotion and sitting with it with your child was clear. At school, the learning pit, is an opportunity for children to explore feelings of potentially being overwhelmed, while working out ways of solving achieving their goal. Restorative justice conversations, in which children acknowledge their part of a problem, working towards restoring the relationships, also helps them build life-long interpersonal skills.

The part of the evening where we all squirmed a bit was when Christiane introduced Emotion Dismissing. I challenge you all to read the slide and think of a time when you’ve done this! If you are like me, it won’t be difficult at all.

I though Christiane’s advice to flip the but was great, e.g. I have to… but then I can…

 

So our challenge is rather than be emotionally dismissive, is to be an Emotion Coach.

A simple, and in no way perfect example of Emotion Coaching was today, when I was with a very upset student.

As often happens, I was busy at the time, and it was nearly the end of the school day, so time was limited. Hearing this child’s distress it was clear that I needed to reprioritise my time and support her. Calmly I sat on the floor near her, simply listening, after a little while, I 

asked her to sit next to me. Through showing empathy towards her strength of emotions, and asking open-ended questions, she was able to tell me how scared and angry she was. She helped me understand her situation more and through saying things such as “I can see you’re really sad.” I was able to validate her emotions. Ultimately, through empathising and questioning (emotion coaching and restorative justice techniques) together we were able to begin solving her problem.

I’m looking forward to next Tuesday night where we’ll further explore emotion coaching and anger. Please register if you are interested in attending, even if you’ve not been able to come previously!

school life

maths

 

Numbers are amazing!

Today I was sitting in the little intervention office pondering number and counting. Jessie and I are investigating the big ideas in maths which has been fascinating! The first important concept that students need to master is trusting the count. When I first heard this in my first year I didn’t really understand how much there is to counting and how important it is. The idea behind trusting the count is when students know that the last item they counted is the total number of items, if you count some objects and them move them around and recount them it will be the same amount, having a mental picture of numbers in your mind and see them (for example they can see 8 as 6 and 2 or 7 and 1) as well as recognising collections without counting (subitising).

Connected to that is *drum roll* Place Value! Another concept that seems simple in theory but in fact it is rich and vital for mathematical learning. Place value is the value represented by a digit in a number on the basis of its position in the number. 

During one of our PMSS sessions, Di Siemon spoke to us about how important place value is and it really resonated with Jessie and I. She was discussing the fact that the curriculum requires us to move on so fast but what is the point in that if students are missing key place value concepts or counting strategies? That’s when a light bulb went off for us about how we really need to slowwwwwww downnnnnnnnn.

As I was getting my head around the Big Ideas, I was looking at the Vic Curric (if you’re interested, have a look here file:///C:/Users/09268263/Downloads/2%20Mathematics%20Number%20and%20Algebra%20Levels%20F-6.pd

As I was looking, the obvious ones were counting and actual place value activities such as recognise, model, represent and order numbers to at least 1000. But then I moved down to addition and subtraction. At a glance, it wouldn’t seem like trusting the count and place value were needed for addition and subtraction but then…how do you know about trading or where the numbers go if you don’t have a concept of place value? And then I moved on to multiplication and division. How can you actually understand multiplication if you’re not sure which numbers go where or how to count past certain amounts? I cut out all the number and algebra strands and stick it under the ‘trusting the count’ and ‘place value’ banner. I then continued to look at the curriculum and read the measurement and geometry section. In almost all levels you need to measure something or weigh something which means you will need to use some kind of measuring tool and read what it says. And if you’re reading what it says, that means you’re reading the numbers on it! Which means you need a good understanding of number. So no matter what part of the curriculum you’re learning you need a strong number sense.

So, if you’re looking at ways to support your child at home I would say number number number! Any kind of counting or numbers, any way to break down large numbers, any way to count groups of objects quickly. The more counting and exposure to numbers, no matter the size will be a great start to your child’s understanding of number!

Have a great weekend,

Jessie and Alice

 

 

 

 

building works

After many months of detailing the concerns with our beautiful old building, our safety worries, and our most urgent maintenance needs, it has been a real pleasure to move onto the visioning stage of capital works. Our AMP document (attached in last week's newsletter) was endorsed by the school council, DET and the VSBA without any requests for changes (very exciting!) and architect interviews were conducted this week. Once the architecture firm has been confirmed, Phase 2 starts immediately.

In the next phase of this process, the architects will be gathering detailed information about the school site to mitigate stumbling across problems well into our design or build. Stakeholder consultation and engagement is an integral part of this process and the selected firm will be asked to lead workshops with students, families, teachers and school council in order to understand how our community use (and want to use) the various spaces within our school.

Stay tuned to find out about opportunities to meet our architects and have your say.

oshc & sprout

oshc

 

school council

CHECK HERE NEXT ISSUE FOR NEWS FROM SCHOOL COUNCIL & SUB COMMITTEES

community

gardening crew

 

the Nor'Wester
Oval Project Report Final.pdf
AMP Phase 1 Brunswick North West.pdf