Melton Mail

29 June 2018
Issue Four
Dates To Remember
Principal's Report
Assistant Principals' Report
Sub Schools
 MSC Information 
College News
Wellbeing
Child Safe
Youth Connect
Year 10 History
Year 11 History
Drama
STEM
Outdoor Education
Careers/Pathways
Library
Kokoda Trail Trek
Sport
Community
Melton Secondary College
03 9743 3322
Coburns Road
Melton, Victoria, 3337
AU

Dates To Remember

July

Wednesday 18 July

Year 12 VCE - Footscray Victoria University

Monday 23 July

Year 10 (2019) Parent Evening 6pm to 7pm

Friday 27 July

Year 12 Biology - Ecolinc

Tuesday 31 July

Year 9 (Year 10 2019) Course Counselling

August

Thursday 2 August

Year 7A & 8A (selected) - ABCN

Monday 6 August to Thursday 9 August

Japan Sister School visit

Wednesday 8 August

AIME - Fed. University

Monday 13 August

Year 9 (2019) Parent Evening 6pm to 7pm

Friday 31 August

Year 9 ODE - Werribee Gorge State 

 

Principal's Report

David Reynolds - Principal

Student Learning Progress

Melton Secondary College students are flourishing, achieving progress with their learning and setting themselves up for a bright future. During first semester we have been implementing a new Independent Reading Program for students in Years 7 & 8.  Reading is fundamental to success in school and students need to be able to read texts which are increasingly more complex as they progress through the year levels so their skills need to develop quickly. The Junior Independent Reading Program is in its early stages, but we are already seeing an increase in the number of students borrowing books from the library and reading whenever they have spare minutes. We know that this investment in our students reading skills will set them up for a more successful future and we know we will have more success if reading is supported at home as well. The Community Engagement sub-committee of School Council will be looking at ways that the college can work with families to support higher rates of reading at home. Stay tuned for some great ideas and information in the next edition of the Melton Mail.

Increased Student Voice

At Melton Secondary College we believe that the voice of students should take equal place along with parents, staff and the community when it comes to decision-making at the highest level. For this reason, our School Council has had student members for some years now, currently filled by our school captains, Winona Duka and Jacob Azopardi. This year the state government made changes to the legislation to add a new Student category of membership for every government school council. What this means for us is two more students will join our school council making a total of four. At the start of next term, students at all year levels will have the opportunity to nominate for one of the two new places and if there are more than two  students nominated, an election will be held. Compass News Feed has more information on this topic and nomination forms.

Student Voice in the Classroom

The Department of Education recently released a new initiative designed to increase student involvement in classrooms. Titled Amplify, this initiative requires schools to involve students in all areas of the running of the school. At Melton Secondary College we have already put in place a number of these strategies. One of these is the Pivot survey which is used by teachers twice each year in order to gather feedback about teaching and learning in their classrooms. The first Pivot survey results have recently been returned and teachers will be discussing the feedback with students over the next few weeks. 

High Resolves Student Leadership

On Thursday 28 June, student leaders from Years 7-9 participated in the Collective Identity module as part of the High Resolves Global Citizenship Program. The module explored the central idea that we all belong to one single, yet diverse human race. Students took part in a simulation, played games, and shared their own ideas and experiences.

The first activity had the students move around the room to explore different elements of their own identity and compare them to their peers. Students were then immersed in the fictional world of the ‘Star Games’, where their life opportunities were determined by how well they did in a series of challenges and the star sign they were assigned. After competing in the challenges, the students reflected on how stereotypes and ‘us versus them’ thinking plays out in the real world. The students then took part in two other small group activities that explored the best ways to counter divisive messaging. At the end of the module, each student was asked to complete their own ‘I resolve to’ card, making a specific commitment to take a global citizenship type action in the following days or weeks. Please see below for some examples.

 

High Resolves is a not-for-profit, non-religious, non-partisan, educational program that motivates high school students to be purposeful global citizens and to develop the mindsets and skills they need to lead their communities, and the world, to a brighter future. More details can be found at www.highresolves.org.

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) 

Information sessions are being run for parents who wish to learn about the NDIS and have a children who are:

  • Students receiving Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding for Vision Impairment;
  • Students enrolled at a Specialist School exclusively for students with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability;
  • Students with disability transport program (Specialist School Bus, taxi or conveyance allowance);
  • Personal care support at school (Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding at level 4, 5 or 6; and/or Medical Intervention Support (MIS).

Please go the the Community page in this edition of the Melton Mail for details.

Assistant Principals' Report

The Year 11 & 12 VCE students have now completed their final assessments for Units 1 & 3. As part of the preparation for their final Year 12 examinations we hold formal examinations to help them learn the skills of revision and time management. We want them to pass these assessments so that we can be certain they have the necessary skills and knowledge for the next phase of learning. If they do not pass on their first attempt, we expect them to complete further revision with their teacher and then re-sit the examination. Please support your child with this process by asking them about their exam results and explaining to them the need for the re-sit if it is necessary. Re-sits will occur in the final week of the term.

This term a number of our senior students have been involved in performances to help them prepare for their performance exams. The school community has been uniformly impressed with the standard of work of our Drama and Music students. The picture below shows one of them, Gypsy Tyrell, also performing at the Year 11 Assembly.

The VCAL students have been involved in the completion of the Personal Development Projects. I have been impressed with the creative ways they have found to raise money for worthy charities and their ability to articulate what they are doing. Some groups have been working on beautifying areas of the school. One of these is the Library Barbeque area which 12A has painted with flags representing the cultural background of our students (see picture below).

 

 

Sub Schools

Junior Sub School

Over the last few weeks, there has been many positive things occurring in the Junior Sub School. During our Student Engagement and Well Being Assembly we handed out some STARR Award certificates. Special Congratulations to the following students. Sam Gai, Bailey Dwyer, Komalpreet Pannu, Christian Mrzyglod, Gop Majak,  Bailey Kershaw, Mr Borg, Miss Boultwood and Mr Hartley. Yesterday we started our Year 8 Bushwalk challenge at Lerdeberg Gorge. The first group being 8G managed to make it all the way to the top, which was a huge effort. Special thanks to Mr Velden for his efforts in getting this happening. Over this term and Term 3 all Year 8 students will be venturing out to complete this challenge.

Middle Sub School

Helipad: Drug and Alcohol awareness program (Year 9s)

On May 8th this term all year, nine students participated in the Helipad (drug and alcohol awareness program). The program was organised through the schools health and wellbeing program and West Care Medical Centre. Kayley Crees from 9A said, “We participated in a number of activities that explained the importance of staying safe in different situations… we learnt about mental health and bullying and where to seek help”.

Victorian Police and Paramedic services presented on the day and together with Doctors from WestCare Medical centre in Melton, each providing vital information to students. Jarrod Bibby mentioned, “We learn about drug and alcohol and how they can affect you”. Jarrod said that it was important for year 9s to learn about making right choices and staying safe around drugs and alcohol. Avah Holler points out that learning about CPR and calling emergency services was information everyone needs to know, she says that “Be safe, there is always someone to call”.

Kayley, Jarrod and Avah all agreed that it was an important and fun event for all year 9 students and that the school should keep running the program.

Written by Kayley Crees, Jarrod Bibby and Avah Holler of 9A and Nathanael Poljak (Secondary School Nurse).

 

Drive Safe Program (Year 10s)

Through term 2 all Year 10 students will be running through a Drive Safe program. The program, sponsored by Melton City Council, was organised through the schools Health and Wellbeing program. The Drive Safe program encourages students to make positive and safe decisions when entering a car.  Students where challenged to drive a driving simulator while texting, merging, driving in the wet, driving while wearing fatal vision goggles, and more. Hayden Moore from 10B said “the program was to teach us how to drive safe” he explained that while wearing the goggles he was “visually impaired - they created the illusion that you see what a drunk person sees”. “I learnt the dangers of driving and how important it is to drive safe”. It also taught me to stop and think about my own actions. Arleah Hunt from 10B stated; “I think schools around Australia should recommend this for all children to learn before doing the wrong thing on the road. I learnt many new rules and how to stay safe”.

Students engaged in discussion regards the unsafe driving scenarios. Although it was fun for students, they also got the clear message that distractions such as texting and using a phone can be a fatal mistake.  It is our hope that they will remember the key messages when entering into a friend’s car and not distract the driver. We want all students and families to be safe on the road and to “Think before You Drive” (Transport Accident Commission - TAC).

Please take care of each other on the road this winter.

Written by Hayden Moore and Arleah Hunt from 10B and Nathanael Poljak (Secondary School Nurse)

 

Senior Sub School

High Achiever Profile

Courtney Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Achievements: Successful completion of Year 11 VCE with the goal to complete Senior VCAL 2018.

Progress Reports GPA of 4.0 – perfect score

Currently enrolled in Hospitality Cert III at Tabcorp Park with part time paid work.

2019 Goal: Hoping to increase qualifications to work with animals or further Hospitality opportunities.

Tips: Keep career options open by studying hard in whichever course you do. Be your best in all aspects of education and employment.

Surround yourself with supportive and positive people.

Amielia Wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Achievements: Excellent Year 11 results in 2017 with a 45 Study Score in Unit 3&4 Psychology. Kwong Lee Dow Young Scholarship recipient.

Best Subjects: Currently studying in the Psychology extension program at Melbourne Uni. Also enjoying Literature and Music

2018 Goal: 37 Study Score in each Year 12 subject.

2019 Goal: Study at Melbourne Uni to become a Child Psychologist

Study Tips: Engage and be in the moment during class. Revision is much easier when you have understood the class lesson.

 

Molly Hayes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Achievements: Excellent Year 11 results in 2017 with an Outstanding Unit 3&4 Study Score in Psychology

Best Subjects: Literature and Legal studies

2018 Goal: 85+ ATAR with 35+ Study Scores in all subjects

2019 Goal: Bachelor of Arts at Melbourne Uni majoring in International studies

Molly is an enthusiastic member of the Year 12 morning gym club, maintaining healthy mind healthy body.

Study Tips: Ensure you maintain a positive approach to your studies, including a growth mindset, by prioritising study while keeping physically and socially active.

 

ACU Year 12 revision Workshops 

 

 MSC Information 

General Office 

Office hours:  8:15 am - 4:30 pm

 

Parents visiting the school or trying to make contact with their children must always make contact with the General Office first.

Uniform Shop

Uniform shop hours are:

 

Mondays:             8:00 to 9:00 am

                                 3:00 to 4:00 pm

 

Wednesdays:      2:30 to 3:30 pm

 

Fridays:                 8:00 to 9:00 am

                                 3:00 to 5:00 pm

School Canteen

Students are able to order food for lunchtime before school and order food for recess at lunchtime. By ordering food at these times, it is guaranteed that food is available.

EFTPOS is now available for students to use.

 

Camps, Sports and Excursions Fund (CSEF)

If you hold a valid means-tested concession card or are a temporary foster parent, you may be eligible for CSEF.  The allowance will be paid to the school to use towards expenses relating to camps, excursions or sporting activities/sports uniform for the benefit of your child.

 

The annual CSEF amount per student will be $225 for secondary school students.

 

How to Apply:

Contact the school office to obtain a CSEF application form or download from www.education.vic.gov.au/csef

Closing date: To be advised

State School Relief

Applicants applying for State School's Relief must have a valid Health Care Card dated first day of the 2018 school year.

Assistance may be available if you are experiencing financial difficulties.

Please contact the Business Manager on

9743 3322.

Every Minute Counts

 

General

Lost Property:

If your child has lost any items in school last year, please encourage them to check lost property located in sickbay during their breaks, before or after school.  

We highly recommend that all clothing is clearly labelled with your childs name. 

Locks:

All locks are supplied by the school. 

Non school locks will be removed from lockers.

Bike Cage:

Please encourage your child to lock his/her bike inside the bike cage and not outside.

INSURANCE

STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE, AMBULANCE COVER AND PRIVATE PROPERTY BROUGHT TO SCHOOL

Parents and guardians are reminded that the Department of Education and Training (DET) does not provide personal accident insurance or ambulance cover for students. Parents and guardians of students, who do not have student accident/insurance/ambulance cover, are responsible for paying the cost of medical treatment for injured students, including the cost of ambulance attendance or transport as well as any other transport costs.  The DET cannot provide advice to parents or guardians on the purchase of individual student accident policy or ambulance cover.  Insurance policies can be purchased from commercial insurers.  Private property brought to school by students, staff or visitors is not insured and the Department does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage. This can include mobile phones, calculators, toys, sporting equipment and cars parked on school premises.  As the DET does not hold insurance for personal property brought to schools and has no capacity to pay for any loss or damage to such property, students and staff are discouraged from bringing any unnecessary or particularly valuable items to school.

College News

Homework Club / Study Hall

To support Melton Secondary College’s vision of a flourishing learning community, achieving high levels of academic growth and bright futures for every student, we run a Homework Club and Study Hall Program after school.

Homework Club:

Homework Club is in the library on Mondays (3.10-4.30pm) and Wednesdays (2.30-4.00pm). Students who have incomplete homework or classwork may be asked by their teacher to attend Homework Club so that they can get additional support to catch up. Students are also welcome to attend Homework Club whenever they would like additional support with their school work.

 

Study Hall:

Study Hall is in T2 on Tuesdays and Thursdays (3.30-4.30pm). Students who have not successfully completed important Assessment Tasks will be directed by their teacher to attend Study Hall. The teacher will notify the student of this and will attempt to notify you. If your child is enrolled in Study Hall you will be able to see this on Compass. We want every student to make strong academic progress and successful completion of assessment tasks is important for demonstrating this progress. If a student has not completed their assessment task and does not attend Study Hall, they will be issued with the consequence of an after school detention. If your child is unable to attend Study Hall due to other commitments, please make alternate arrangements with your child’s teacher, for the completion of the assessment task.

 

It has been great to see many students receive STARR awards for their focus, hard work and effort in the classroom so far this year. We look forward to continuing to celebrate this success and the academic progress of our students.

Interschool Chess Tournament 

Forty-two students from the following schools were involved in the tournament we hosted today.

  1. Alamanda College 
  2. Creekside College
  3. Keilor Downs Secondary College
  4. Mosfield Primary School
  5. Southern Cross Grammar
  6. Werribee Secondary College
  7. Melton Secondary College

 

 

 

 

Our school was represented by the following students who embodied all the STARR VALUES:

1. Aden Buhagiar 11D

2.  Ben Meredith 10E 

3. Zac Collins 8A

4. Bailey Kershaw 8A

5. Samuel Jones 8A

6. Junior Bagula 8A

7. Aodhan Heath 8A

8. Jonah Mason 7G

9. Riley Pakingan 7A

10. Aditya Sharma 7A

11. Natthapang Tidtam 7A

The Results:

Open Secondary Division:                                                

1st Keilor Downs College                                                  

2nd Werribee Secondary College

3rd Melton Secondary College

Middle Years Division

1st Alamanda College

2nd Keilor Downs

3rd Melton Secondary College

Wellbeing

Wellbeing Team Update

The Wellbeing Team would like to update you on some changes to our team over the past few weeks.

 

Welcome

The Wellbeing Team would like to welcome Jess Jacobsen to our team as Acting Wellbeing Co-Ordinator.

Jess Jacobsen

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have been at MSC for over 4 years now in various roles across the school. I am excited to be working with the Wellbeing Team again to proactively approach the needs of our diverse students. My role has many working parts which means I will have a hand a variety of things across the college. I will be working with parents, students and teachers to develop plans and source funding and recommendations for students with learning needs. I will be sourcing and planning programs to help students to build resilience, strong relationships with peers and teachers, to stamp out bullying, manage emotions and to advance our school diversity in various programs including girls empowerment, Indigenous programs, refugee and migrant programs and many leadership workshops. I look forward to working closely with Stacey, Dani and Chris to support the improvement of student wellbeing.

 

Farewells

The Wellbeing Team has said a temporary goodbye to two members of our team, Amanda Xavier and Nathanael Poljak. Amanda is on Family Leave as she is set to welcome baby number two whilst Nathanael has taken up a short term contract in the Regional Office.

Nathanael’s new positions has meant that we have had to postpone a few programs that he had scheduled to run until late Term 3 when he is due to return.

The Wellbeing Team on behalf of the whole MSC community would like to thank both Amanda and Nathanael for all their work and look forward having them back at MSC in the near future.

 

Wellbeing Brochure

 

State School Relief

If you require some support regarding school uniform, the Wellbeing Team is available to discuss available supports. State Schools Relief can provide vouchers towards the cost of uniform items. Please contact, Stacey James to discuss eligibility criteria. Please note that not all items are covered by State School Relief. Stacey will be able to provide you with more information.

 Please contact Stacey on 9743 3322 or [email protected]

INTERNET: Parent Tip Sheet

WHAT IS THE ATTRACTION?

The Internet has a myriad of attractions to young people. It is instantaneous, highly interactive and immensely private, which are highly prized attributes for most young people. It gives them access to their mates, music and media without leaving home. It has addictive qualities we know, but that does not mean that a young person should become a Net addict.

 

HOW SHOULD PARENTS REACT?

TREAT .COM RELATIONSHIPS AND ACTIVITIES LIKE ANY OTHER:

Mocking their cyber friends and cyber activities can only drive them further into the cyber world of rebellion and further away from the real world.

 

IF THE CYBER WORLD IS THE REAL WORLD for your young person as he shuns most other activities as well as people it may be time to take some action or even get some help.

 

INVOLVE YOURSELF IN THEIR CYBER ACTIVITIES, much as you would any other type of activity. Take the time to find out what they are doing and what they get from the activities.

 

NEGOTIATE ONLINE TIME ALLOCATIONS and share time online with other interested siblings. Locate the computer connected to the Internet in a public place at home so that you are accessible and also so sharing can occur.

 

ASK YOUR YOUNG PERSON WHAT A REASONABLE AMOUNT OF TIME MAY BE ONLINE. If they violate that limit then ask them if they have a problem. Let them think it over for a time. Perhaps you can bargain real time activities in exchange for time online.

 

OFFER OFFLINE ALTERNATIVES TO ENTERTAINMENT, EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION. Remind them that there are offline alternatives, even if they do not use them all the time.

 

This is a Short Message from your Melton SC Welfare Team. If you have any issues regarding this and are unsure where to turn, please make an appointment with the school welfare team. Thanks, Nathanael.

 

Child Safe

GET THE FACTS

As adults we all play a critical role to protect children from harm. 

As a parent or carer you have the primary responsibility for protecting and caring for your own children and supporting them to build relationships that are safe and respectful.

You also play a critical role in identifying and responding to suspected abuse within the community. In fact it may amount to a criminal offence if you fail to report suspected sexual child abuse.

 

REPORTING ABUSE

What should I do if I suspect that my child has been abused?

If you believe that your child has been abused, or is at risk of being abused contact Victoria Police immediately via the local police station or on 000 if it’s an emergency.

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF SUSPECT THAT ANOTHER CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

If you suspect that a child has been abused, or is at risk of abuse (such as physical abuse, family violence or neglect) you should report immediately to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Child Protection (see contact detail at the end of this fact sheet)

  • If you suspect that a child has been sexually abused, you must also report your concerns to the Victoria Police. You may be committing a criminal offence if you fail to do so.
  • You should report even if you’re not sure. It is the role of authorities to investigate your concerns and determine if any further action needs to be taken.
  • Parent and carers are also often in a position to protect the friends of their children. This is because children are most likely to disclose their experiences of abuse to their peers, who in turn may share this with their own parents and carers. 
  • If your child talks to you about their friend, and you suspect that the child is being abused or is at risk of being abused, you should act. You may be the only adult in a position to act and your response may be critical in protecting that child’s safety.

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSPECT THAT A CHILD IS BEING ABUSED AND AUTHORITIES HAVE PREVIOUSLY INVESTIGATED AND DISMISSED MY REPORT?

If you have new grounds for believing that a child is being abused, you should make another report to DHHS Child Protection or Victoria Police. Every report is critical to protecting a child as it builds evidence and helps authorities to gain a clearer understanding of risks to the child.

 

WHAT HAPPENS TO MY CHILD IF SOMEONE AT THE SCHOOL SUSPECTS THAT MY CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

All staff members at your child’s school are required to report suspected child abuse to DHHS Child Protection and, in some circumstances, to Victoria Police.

 

Your child’s school will contact you as soon as possible, unless they have been advised not to do so by DHHS Child Protection and/or Victoria Police.

 

Where appropriate the school will work with you to ensure that your child is provided with support, which may include referring them to wellbeing professionals.

 

WHEN IS IT A CRIMINAL OFFENCE TO NOT REPORT SUSPECT ABUSE?

Any adult may face criminal charges if they believe that another adult has committed a sexual offence against a child under 16 years of age and does not report this information to the police.

 

FACTS ON CHILD ABUSE

WHAT IS CHILD ABUSE? 

Child abuse:

  • can include physical abuse, sexual abuse, grooming, emotional or physiological harm, neglect or family violence
  • does not have to involve physical contact or force (eg, child sexual abuse can include talking to a child in a sexually explicit way)
  • can be committed by any member of the community, including someone within a child’s family or someone within the school setting.

 

The trauma associated with child abuse can significantly impact upon the wellbeing and development of a child. This is why it is critical that we all respond immediately to any form of suspected abuse.

 

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS THAT A CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

There are a range of physical and behavioural indicators of child abuse. 

Most importantly you should act if you notice anything that causes you to form a reasonable belief that a child has been, or is at risk of being abused, including (but not limited to):

  • a change in a child’s behaviour (e.g. withdrawal, regressive behaviour, or non-age appropriate sexual behaviours)
  • physical indicators of abuse (e.g. unexplained bruises, welts, signs of malnutrition)
  • an inappropriate relationship between an adult and a child (e.g. inappropriate physical contact, unexplained gifts or phone/email contact).

THE SCHOOL’S ROLE

HOW MUST SCHOOLS RESPOND TO SUSPECTED CHILD ABUSE?

All staff in Victorian schools are obligated to respond to any incident or suspicion of child abuse as outlined below: 

 

       1.  Respond to the emergency

              Address any immediate health and safety needs (eg. administer    

              first aid or contact emergency services).

 

       2.  Inform authorities

              Report any reasonable belief that a child has been, or is at risk of

              being abused to the DHHS Child Protection or Victoria Police.

 

       3.  Contact parents/carers when appropriate

              Contact parents/carers once authorities advise that it is safe and

              appropriate to do so.

 

             Ideally parents/carers will play a central role in providing support

             for their children, however schools will be instructed not to      

             contact parents/carers in circumstances where this may impede

             an investigation or place the child at greater risk.

 

       4.  Provide ongoing support for all children impacted by the

             abuse

             Provide appropriate support for all children impacted by abuse.

             This will likely include ongoing counselling from professionals.

             The child’s ongoing support will be documented in a Student

             Support Plan.

 

These actions are outlined in further detail in Identifying and Responding to All Forms of Abuse in Victorian Schools.

 

ARE THE STAFF AT MY CHILD'S SCHOOL REQUIRED TO REPORT CHILD ABUSE?

Yes – all staff at your child’s school are required by law to report any reasonable belief that a child has been abused, or is at risk of abuse.

 

In some circumstances, it may be a criminal offence for school staff to fail to report child abuse to the authorities.

 

PROTECTING MY CHILD

WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP EDUCATE AND PROTECT MY CHILD FROM ABUSE?

Have a chat to your child and make sure that he or she knows that no one is allowed to threaten, hurt or touch them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

Every relationship should be respectful and no one should behave in a way that makes them feel unsafe or afraid.

 

Your child’s school will also be supporting your child in learning about their rights to be safe and respected. Victorian government schools are teaching the Respectful Relationships program which promotes positive attitudes and behaviours and is aimed at preventing family violence. 

 

WHAT SHOULD I TALK ABOUT WHEN I EXPLAIN SAFETY TO MY CHILD?

There are some things you can do at home to build your child’s understanding of safe and respectful relationships including:

  • talking openly with your child about their feelings and relationships
  • being sure that they understand you will listen and act if they are concerns about how anyone is treating them
  • using the correct names for body parts and having age-appropriate  conversations about touching and sexual activity
  • letting your child know that adults should never harm or act in a sexual way with any child.

KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE OUTSIDE OF THE HOME OR SCHOOL 

You play a critical role in ensuring that your children are spending time in safe places.

In Victoria all people who are working with your children such as coaches and music teachers need to have a current Working With Children Check.

You may like to check that any staff and volunteers spending time with your child after school hours and on weekend have a valid Working With Children Check. 

If you think that you may need some help to keep your children safe from harm and support their healthy development, it is important you find some help. Visit the Victorian Government’s Better Health Channel for information on seeking support: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/parenting-support-to-help-prevent-abuse

 

24 Hour Services

Victoria Police                                                                                             000

Department of Health and Human Services                                  131 278

Child Protection                                                                                           

GET THE FACTS

As adults we all play a critical role to protect children from harm. 

As a parent or carer you have the primary responsibility for protecting and caring for your own children and supporting them to build relationships that are safe and respectful.

You also play a critical role in identifying and responding to suspected abuse within the community. In fact it may amount to a criminal offence if you fail to report suspected sexual child abuse.

 

REPORTING ABUSE

What should I do if I suspect that my child has been abused?

If you believe that your child has been abused, or is at risk of being abused contact Victoria Police immediately via the local police station or on 000 if it’s an emergency.

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF SUSPECT THAT ANOTHER CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

If you suspect that a child has been abused, or is at risk of abuse (such as physical abuse, family violence or neglect) you should report immediately to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Child Protection (see contact detail at the end of this fact sheet)

  • If you suspect that a child has been sexually abused, you must also report your concerns to the Victoria Police. You may be committing a criminal offence if you fail to do so.
  • You should report even if you’re not sure. It is the role of authorities to investigate your concerns and determine if any further action needs to be taken.
  • Parent and carers are also often in a position to protect the friends of their children. This is because children are most likely to disclose their experiences of abuse to their peers, who in turn may share this with their own parents and carers. 
  • If your child talks to you about their friend, and you suspect that the child is being abused or is at risk of being abused, you should act. You may be the only adult in a position to act and your response may be critical in protecting that child’s safety.

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSPECT THAT A CHILD IS BEING ABUSED AND AUTHORITIES HAVE PREVIOUSLY INVESTIGATED AND DISMISSED MY REPORT?

If you have new grounds for believing that a child is being abused, you should make another report to DHHS Child Protection or Victoria Police. Every report is critical to protecting a child as it builds evidence and helps authorities to gain a clearer understanding of risks to the child.

 

WHAT HAPPENS TO MY CHILD IF SOMEONE AT THE SCHOOL SUSPECTS THAT MY CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

All staff members at your child’s school are required to report suspected child abuse to DHHS Child Protection and, in some circumstances, to Victoria Police.

 

Your child’s school will contact you as soon as possible, unless they have been advised not to do so by DHHS Child Protection and/or Victoria Police.

 

Where appropriate the school will work with you to ensure that your child is provided with support, which may include referring them to wellbeing professionals.

 

WHEN IS IT A CRIMINAL OFFENCE TO NOT REPORT SUSPECT ABUSE?

Any adult may face criminal charges if they believe that another adult has committed a sexual offence against a child under 16 years of age and does not report this information to the police.

 

FACTS ON CHILD ABUSE

WHAT IS CHILD ABUSE? 

Child abuse:

  • can include physical abuse, sexual abuse, grooming, emotional or physiological harm, neglect or family violence
  • does not have to involve physical contact or force (eg, child sexual abuse can include talking to a child in a sexually explicit way)
  • can be committed by any member of the community, including someone within a child’s family or someone within the school setting.

 

The trauma associated with child abuse can significantly impact upon the wellbeing and development of a child. This is why it is critical that we all respond immediately to any form of suspected abuse.

 

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS THAT A CHILD HAS BEEN ABUSED?

There are a range of physical and behavioural indicators of child abuse. 

Most importantly you should act if you notice anything that causes you to form a reasonable belief that a child has been, or is at risk of being abused, including (but not limited to):

  • a change in a child’s behaviour (e.g. withdrawal, regressive behaviour, or non-age appropriate sexual behaviours)
  • physical indicators of abuse (e.g. unexplained bruises, welts, signs of malnutrition)
  • an inappropriate relationship between an adult and a child (e.g. inappropriate physical contact, unexplained gifts or phone/email contact).

THE SCHOOL’S ROLE

HOW MUST SCHOOLS RESPOND TO SUSPECTED CHILD ABUSE?

All staff in Victorian schools are obligated to respond to any incident or suspicion of child abuse as outlined below: 

 

       1.  Respond to the emergency

              Address any immediate health and safety needs (eg. administer    

              first aid or contact emergency services).

 

       2.  Inform authorities

              Report any reasonable belief that a child has been, or is at risk of

              being abused to the DHHS Child Protection or Victoria Police.

 

       3.  Contact parents/carers when appropriate.

              Contact parents/carers once authorities advise that it is safe and

              appropriate to do so.

 

             Ideally parents/carers will play a central role in providing support

             for their children, however schools will be instructed not to      

             contact parents/carers in circumstances where this may impede

             an investigation or place the child at greater risk.

 

       4.  Provide ongoing support for all children impacted by the

             abuse.

             Provide appropriate support for all children impacted by abuse.

             This will likely include ongoing counselling from professionals.

             The child’s ongoing support will be documented in a Student

             Support Plan.

 

These actions are outlined in further detail in Identifying and Responding to All Forms of Abuse in Victorian Schools.

 

ARE THE STAFF AT MY CHILD'S SCHOOL REQUIRED TO REPORT CHILD ABUSE?

Yes – all staff at your child’s school are required by law to report any reasonable belief that a child has been abused, or is at risk of abuse.

 

In some circumstances, it may be a criminal offence for school staff to fail to report child abuse to the authorities.

 

PROTECTING MY CHILD

WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP EDUCATE AND PROTECT MY CHILD FROM ABUSE?

Have a chat to your child and make sure that he or she knows that no one is allowed to threaten, hurt or touch them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable.

 

Every relationship should be respectful and no one should behave in a way that makes them feel unsafe or afraid.

 

Your child’s school will also be supporting your child in learning about their rights to be safe and respected. Victorian government schools are teaching the Respectful Relationships program which promotes positive attitudes and behaviours and is aimed at preventing family violence. 

 

WHAT SHOULD I TALK ABOUT WHEN I EXPLAIN SAFETY TO MY CHILD?

There are some things you can do at home to build your child’s understanding of safe and respectful relationships including:

  • talking openly with your child about their feelings and relationships
  • being sure that they understand you will listen and act if they are concerns about how anyone is treating them
  • using the correct names for body parts and having age-appropriate  conversations about touching and sexual activity
  • letting your child know that adults should never harm or act in a sexual way with any child.

KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE OUTSIDE OF THE HOME OR SCHOOL 

You play a critical role in ensuring that your children are spending time in safe places.

In Victoria all people who are working with your children such as coaches and music teachers need to have a current Working With Children Check.

You may like to check that any staff and volunteers spending time with your child after school hours and on weekend have a valid Working With Children Check. 

If you think that you may need some help to keep your children safe from harm and support their healthy development, it is important you find some help. Visit the Victorian Government’s Better Health Channel for information on seeking support: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/parenting-support-to-help-prevent-abuse

 

24 Hour Services

Victoria Police                                                                                             000

Department of Health and Human Services                                  13 12 78

Child Protection                                                                                        

GET THE FACTS 

This fact sheet has been designed to give you the facts about child abuse.  It includes advice on what to do if you have been abused, are being abused, or at risk of being abused. This fact sheet also provides you with advice if you know someone who has been abused, or is at risk of being abused.

 

WHAT ARE YOUR RIGHTS? 

  • Everyone has the right to feel safe and be protected from abuse.
  • No one is allowed to threaten you, hurt you, or touch you in a way that makes you feel uncomfortable, unsafe or afraid.
  • This includes all adults, other teenagers and children – it includes everyone from family members, coaches, teachers, to friends and strangers.
  • Every relationship should be respectful.
  • No one should ever involve you in sexual activity without your consent, and no one should behave in a way that makes you feel unsafe or afraid.
  • You don’t have to deal with abuse on your own. Talk to a trusted adult.  Teachers and other adults at your school can support you to get help.

WHAT IS CHILD ABUSE?  

  • Child abuse includes physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional or psychological harm, neglect, and family violence.
  • Child abuse can also include grooming. This is behaviour where an adult tries to establish a relationship or other emotional connection with a child, to prepare them for a sexual relationship. 
  • Child abuse does not have to involve physical contact or force. It can include:
    • controlling a child through threats
    • exposing a child to sexual material and sexual acts
    • exposing a child to family violence
  • Child abuse can be led by any member of a community or a family member. Abuse can impact anyone and it is never the victim’s fault.

For more information on sexual abuse and sexual assault visit Youth Central:   http://www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au/know-your-rights/sexual-assault .

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I HAVE BEEN ABUSED OR FELL UNSAFE? 

  • You should talk to an adult you trust.
  • If you have been abused, or feel unsafe or threatened in any way you don’t have to deal with this on your own. 
  • Abuse is never your fault and you should tell a trusted adult so you can get the help and support you need to feel safe and protected. Talking to someone won’t get you in trouble.
  • You can tell a teacher or any adult at your school.  They will be able to help you.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK SOMEONE I KNOW HAS BEEN ABUSED OR IS UNSAFE?

  • You should talk to an adult you trust.  Any staff member at your school will be able to help.
  • You can also help your friend by encouraging them to tell a trusted adult.

WHAT IF MY FRIEND DOESN'T WANT TO TELL AN ADULT? 

  • You should still tell an adult you trust on your friend’s behalf. 
  • Even if your friend has specifically asked you not to tell an adult, you still should. It is more important to make sure that your friend is helped and feels protected.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN IF I TELL AN ADULT AT THE SCHOOL THAT I FEEL UNSAFE, OR THAT I KNOW SOMEONE WHO IS UNSAFE? 

  • You will be helped.
  • Teachers and other adults at your school must listen to your concerns and help you.
  • The information will not be shared with the person who is making you feeling unsafe.
  • Information will only be shared with people who can support and protect you.
  • In some cases the people helping you are required by law to tell the police, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Child Protection services and/or your family to prevent any further abuse, or risk of abuse.

WHAT IF I DON'T FEEL LIKE I CAN TALK TO ANYONE AT MY SCHOOL? 

  • You should still find a trusted adult to talk to.
  • Abuse or feeling uncomfortable is too big to deal with on your own. 

THERE ARE MANY PEOPLE WHO CAN SUPPORT YOU TO FEEL SAFE AND PROTECTED. YOU CAN:

  • visit eHeadspace (which provides an online and a 9am-1am telephone support service) www.eheadspace.org.au  or 1800 650 850
  • call KidsHelp Line on 1800 55 1800 or visit for 24 hour support
  • call or visit your local police station or call 000.
  • Talk to your doctor, psychologist, social worker, welfare officer, or another trusted adult.

Youth Connect

Students from Melton Secondary College travelled to the  Victoria Police Academy in Glen Waverley where they were given a tour of the Academy facilities and then participated in a friendly basketball tournament at the Academy basketball court. Our students played a great game and won the tournament.

 

Year 10 History

Year 10 History excursion to the Jewish and Holocaust Museum 

On the 23rd of April, the Year 10 History classes visited the Jewish and Holocaust Museum. Below are three recounts – Enjoy!

 

… At the Jewish museum we were guided through Jewish history and customs that go back hundreds of years. We got to meet first hand Jewish people who had personal experiences from following the religion. Towards the end of the visit we got to experience the St. Kilda Synagogue then participate in a Sabbath. After having a taste into Jewish foods we then ventured to the Holocaust museum. Here was a very representable place of the 6 million Jews lost during the duration of World War two. We got to meet Maria, a survivor of the Holocaust and ask her questions about her story. This was a very sentimental experience that was honestly a massive privilege. Overall the day was full of new learning and was really a deep but important thing to learn about.

From this experience, I learnt what Jewish people had to endure and just how massive the impact was on so many lives around the world. At the Jewish museum it really taught me and others how the Jewish culture is very interesting and just a belief like many others. Maria, the Holocaust survivor really made the experience real. Her story touched your heart of how drastic and gloomy the Holocaust was and taught me how people struggled to survive. Throughout exploring the museum it made the lives lost really apparent, how the 6 million lives lost were human beings with feelings and emotions like the rest of us and mainly how they did not deserve to lose their lives. Being Jewish doesn’t make you different neither does being catholic or Christian, every human is alike. There is no such thing as race.

Based on my learnings from this excursion I will implement it into my everyday life. To remember that every action and word spoken directs Australia and Australians as a country. Everyone is a human being despite religion, culture and their appearance.

By Felicity Stirrup

…From the experience I learnt what it was like for the Jewish before, middle and after the holocaust and what the Jewish had to do just to survive. I also learnt some Jewish stories and names to put to faces. Hearing the Holocaust survivor’s recollections, I learnt what it was like for someone who had a happy child hood to completely changed and how also what they had to go through even after the war with knowing that all her close friends had died when she was living in a cellar with a few rabbits keeping her and people she loved alive.

Based on what I learnt from the excursion, I will think about the numbers as people and families that died instated of just of a number. I will also remember that we are one race which is human and think about how could one human do this to another intend of just except that as a fact.

By Emily Sell

…Learning about Jewish values and beliefs made me realise how diverse and interesting their religion really is. Following this, we visited the St. Kilda Synagogue. It was a beautiful building full of Jewish culture. We were showed how a normal prayer ceremony would be conducted. After this, we were taken back into the museum to eat traditional Jewish food. Our meal consisted of pita bread, hummus, pickles, salad, and falafel.

After we had finished our meal we were then taken to the Holocaust museum. To start off our experience, we were shown an introductory video that explained what the Holocaust was and its effects. A memorable quote from the video was that “Numbers make you numb”. I feel like this was very deep, as even I myself can still not fathom the amount of deaths during the Holocaust. Next, we were introduced to Maria a survivor of the Holocaust, who survived by hiding and living under false papers. Hearing her story helped me understand the full extent of life during the Holocaust. The fact that we got to listen to an eye witness of the Holocaust made the statistics we are always hearing more significant. Maria’s story has made me appreciate the life we have in Australia.

Based on what I learnt from the excursion, I have developed a deeper appreciation for the courage of the Jewish population and what they endured. From the excursion, I have also learnt that every word and action can affect others. Due to this, I think now I will be more mindful of myself as everyone is human.

By Dominique Dee

Year 11 History

Year 11 History Excursion to The Shrine and State Library
 

Year 11 History students suffered through a cold foggy 8am start at Melton Station on May 14th, to trudge into Melbourne’s CBD. Our trip was to see and speak to war veterans from The Shrine of Remembrance and to gain cross curricula research skills at the State Library. Our train was cancelled so it took a bus, a train and a tram (with a brisk walk) to reach our destination but the students were in good spirits upon arrival and looking forward to learning.

Clive, a peace corp. Vet greeted us, showed us around, explaining to the students the primary source artefacts they were able to hold including helmets, clothing, invasion currency, and landmine tents. Clive then walked us around the Shrine and students were moved by the silence at 11am when we paused to reflect on our fallen soldiers in the Crypt. We wandered down to the eternal flame and discussed the memorial before students placed poppies in the wall of remembrance.

As the fog lifted over the citys cape we walked back down to the tram to travel to the State Library. Students were spilt into groups and taken on a tour of the library exploring the historical aspects of the library and its interesting stories as well as an interactive computer session. The classes were given hands on experience in navigating the online resources and data bases before signing up for future free use of the information.

Before long we were back train hopping to get home to Melton arriving as the fog was settling back in for the evening.

A fantastic experience for all that came along.

Drama

Aaron Hibbert 

Aaron Hibbert scholarship with MTC

Aaron Hibbert in Year 9 has been successful in gaining a place in the Melbourne Theatre Company’s (MTC) Betty Amsden Youth Scholarship Course.

Aaron will attend a life-changing week of intensive drama workshops at MTC HQ from the 2nd to the 6th of July during the school holidays.

Students in the program are guided through the processes of performance making and encouraged to extend their expressive skills, learning how to contribute as a member of an ensemble.

The MSC Arts Department are incredibly proud of Aaron’s success in gaining a place in the program. Less than 25 students are selected across Victoria.

Miss K is looking forward to hearing about Aaron’s experiences at the program and viewing the presentation at the end of the week.

 

Which Way Home reconciliation week performance

On Friday 1st June, Year 12 students Amielia Wall and Jasmine Pryse-Roos attended the Bowery Theatre in St. Albans to view a performance of Which Way Home presented by ILBIJERRI Theatre Company. 

ILBIJERRI Theatre Company tells stories about what it means to be Indigenous in Australia today. Infused with humour and heart WHICH WAY HOME draws on writer Katie Beckett’s own memories of growing up with her single Aboriginal father.

These students were incredibly fortunate to be able to attend this performance of a powerful piece of theatre and to represent Melton Secondary College in our local community.

Caliban performance and workshop

 

As part of VCE Drama our students attended a performance of Caliban by Western Edge Youth Arts (WEYA) at the Bowery Theatre in St. Albans.

Our students will study this performance and will respond via analysis of the performance in both their upcoming written SAC and Exams. The performance centres on the Shakespearean character Caliban and his life after his island has sunk. We saw a complex range of emotions and relationships as well as the key theme of climate change being represented in the performance.

Following the performance our students were also participants in a workshop with other students from nearby schools and the cast and creatives from WEYA. Our students looked at themed devised drama work and practised their skills in performance and physical theatre.

We even got a mention on the writer’s Facebook page- they loved our pre-show group singing! Congratulations to our students for their excellent work on this day and truly embracing the power of the arts.

**Update on today's performance of Caliban in St Albans: there's a piano in the foyer and a group of school students, all girls are having a singalong to Someone Like You by Adele.

The theatre has already begun.

VCE Drama Showcase

Thank you to all the fantastic family, friends and MSC staff who attended our VCE Drama Ensemble Showcase on Wednesday 30th May. M2 and M3 were transformed into the Non-Naturalistic theatre worlds of Bertolt Brecht and Antonin Artaud for our VCE Drama students to present the ensembles they have constructed as part of Unit 1 and Unit 3.

Our Year 11 students devised their performances based around the themes of Home, Self-Identity and Belonging and our Year 12 students on the theme of Equality. With many hours of hard work and dedication both within class and outside we thank everyone who supported us to put this evening together and those who attended to show their support on the night. Until next time!
 

Rebecca Koroneo

Performing Arts Teacher

STEM

Year 10 Systems Engineering

Students in Year 10 Systems Engineering have been working on a STEM Challenge project that develops their 21st Century skills eg problem solving, teamwork, critical thinking and innovation. It is vital that students have opportunities to develop these skills. The project requires them to research, design, build and test a Solar Oven in groups using the Engineering Design Process. The oven they build must be portable, made mostly from recyclable material, and use ONLY the sun to cook basic foods. The students have to compile a folio that shows the process they followed and the theoretical reasoning behind the decisions they made.

 

Spherical Robots

The school recently purchased 12 programmable spherical robots titled “Spheroes”. These can be used by a range of learning areas eg Maths, Science and Technology for both simple and complex learning applications. The students can write simple programs using coding to change the robot speed, direction and time or design challenges for classmates who use coding and formula to complete an objective. These robots are one aspect of the STEM initiative that Melton SC is part of to introduce and embed 21st Century skills into the curriculum to best prepare students for entry into a rapidly changing and evolving work place.

 

Outdoor Education

Year 9 ODE

Our Year 9 Outdoor Ed class have recently completed their final two excursions of what has been a very busy program this semester!

Students spent two days on a camp in Anglesea earlier this term. There they completed Surfing lessons, participated in early morning Yoga with Ms Hollins, went for a night walk on the beach, and then hiked between Aireys Inlet and Fairhaven on the second day before returning home full of stories and new friendships. For many, this was their first experiences of sleeping outdoors and cooking using camping stoves. The whole class were exceptionally well behaved, and represented the college well.

 

Just a few days later, everybody set off for their final day out, where we completed a tree planting day with the Pinkerton Landcare and Environment Group. The day was supported by Western Water, who also put on lunch for the group. By the end of the day, 200 seedlings and native grasses had been planted at the Pinkerton Forest site. An amazing effort by everybody involved!

VCE ODE

Students from our VCE and VCAL Outdoor Ed classes recently completed their most challenging and arguably most beautiful hike to date. Eighteen students hiked over 16km in the Macedon Regional Park, Mount Macedon.

The hike took them through some stunning wet and dry forest, and allowed for yet another rewarding experience. Students were challenged by slippery mud, steep slopes, cold conditions and thick fog throughout the day, but all emerged better for the experience at the end, if not a little more tired!

 

Other recent excursions include Mr Velden’s Year 11 VCE class travelling to Westgate Park and Williamstown, and the first of several Year 8 excursion to Lerderderg Gorge. More on this to come!

As always, if you require any further information in regards to the Outdoor Ed programs offered at Melton Secondary, please speak to Daniel Velden or Michael Kilroy.

Careers/Pathways

Melton Career Expo

Year 12 students attended the Melton Careers Expo at Tabcorp Park on 29th May, engaging in career pathway conversations with many exhibitors from Universities, TAFEs, private providers, RTOs, Apprenticeship Groups & employers. Students also attended a lecture on the VTAC process for University/TAFE applications.

 

Our VET Hairdressing Trainer  Carolyn Galea also attended the Melton Career Expo with our Year 2 students, Caitlyn Evans and Paige Andrews, promoting our Trade Training Centre and the VET Salon Assistant program offered at our school.

 

Trade Training Centre Tours

 

On Friday 1 June selected students from Year 9 visited the Trade Training Centres at Kurunjang SC, Staughton College, CRC Melton & Melton SC to explore the various VET programs that can be selected in Year 10. Students were guided through the Electro technology, Building/Construction, Engineering & Salon Assistant facilities. Students received information on VET programs that will assist with subject selection that will take place in Term 3.

 

Year 11 and 12 VCAL students are completing 4 short courses at Melton Youth Services. These include: RSA, Safe Food Handling, Coffee Barista and Professional Waiter training. These qualifications will assist students gain employment in the Hospitality industry.

 

Melton Secondary College would like to thank Melton Youth Services who have been involved in providing and organising all of these activities  to our students

Year 10 Work Experience

Noah Collins has recently returned from Brisbane where he participated in work experience for 3 days at the Gallipoli Army Barracks. This opportunity was also created by Noah’s successful on line application to participate in the program.

 

Here is Noah’s recount of some of the activities that were organised during his visit:

 

“We went to the Army Malaria Institute. We were given a very interesting tour of the facility where they are finding ways to effectively treat and manage malaria while soldiers are deployed overseas. We also watched a live demonstration of the Weapons Training Simulation System which was very exciting to see.”

 

Year 10 Work Experience Report

Congratulations to all Year 10 students who have completed 1 week work experience during the month of May. Melton Secondary College would like to thank all the local employers who hosted our students. Students have gained valuable work skills. The opportunity to work with adults develops student’s confidence, communication skills and provides them with an insight into possible career pathways.

 

 

Brandon Hutchinson recently completed his work experience in the Dialysis Unit at Williamstown Hospital. Brandon was able to secure this fantastic opportunity by checking hospital websites regularly last year. Dates to apply for work experience were advertised early 2018 and Brandon was a successful candidate from his on line application.

 

Brandon observed patient treatment and recorded information sourced from the medical equipment. Work experience has confirmed Brandon’s career pathway plans to continue further studies in medicine.

 

 

Zachary Osborn also successfully completed his work experience at Amber Aviation Academy in Essendon Fields. He was able to experience flight simulators, learn the business administration side of a flight school and was lucky enough to be taken on a flight on his last day as a reward for his hard work during the week. This was a great opportunity for Zac as his career pathway plans are in the aviation industry.

University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne team would like to invite Year 11 and 12 students to spend A Day at Melbourne this July to explore their passions and discover pathways to their dream careers. 

 

Library

Loving the Library @ MSC

Hi Everyone,

We believe that reading is not just something that is schoolwork. The Centre for Youth Literature at the State Library of Victoria promotes reading as an active, pleasurable and essential activity for all young people. Inside a Dog is a project of the Centre for Youth Literature.  The website promotes young adult literature, highlighting Australian writers and their work and welcomes the views of readers, including reviews, opinion, discussion, competition entries, and feedback.

The website will help students find great reads, share reviews of books they love or hate, discuss book news and hot topics in the news blog and forums and gain insight into an authors’ thoughts about writing and reading with the Writer in Residence blog.

The Inky Awards annually recognises high quality young adult literature by allowing teens to judge the novels they love. There are two awards: The Gold Inky Award for an Australian book and the Silver Inky Award for an international book.  The shortlist are selected entirely by a panel of young judges, and the winner from each category is voted for online by teen readers of insideadog.com.au.  The awards are named after Inky- the wonder dog and mascot for the online platform.

I would like to encourage all students to have a look at the website.

https://insideadog.com.au

 

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Melton Library Membership Forms

Membership forms for the Melton Library are available in the MSC library and will be distributed to each year level over the next few weeks.  Please ensure your forms are completed and returned promptly so that we can access the great services they have to offer.

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The MSC library is open from 8.30am – 4.30pm. Recess and lunchtime are for schoolwork, study or independent reading.  Students may borrow 4 books on a fortnightly basis and are able to re-borrow if required.

 

Kokoda Trail Trek

The Western Youth Kokoda program organised by the Victoria Police is an initiative to engage with young people from diverse backgrounds from the western region. Four of our students who took part in this initiative were Ashley Tia Dau Akol and Grace Garang from Year 12 and Maara Piniata from Year 10 along with many other young people trekking through the Kokoda Trail in Papa New Guinea. Our students participated in a training program before leaving for Kokoda in order for them to be physically ready for the requirements of the trip before leaving May 28 for ten days.

Our school community would like to thank Victoria Police for giving our students an opportunity to be trekkers where they experienced  a meaningful cultural, physical, emotional journey and giving them insight into history of what our Australian soldiers endured during wartime.

Our students returned very inspired by their experience, striving to achieve a personal goal, such as leadership skill and teamwork. The Kokoda adventure was part of creating positive experience which will alternatively stay with our students for forever.  

Sport

News

Rugby

We have had a number of students selected in the Melbourne Rebels Victorian representative teams. Once we have confirmation and details we will highlight them in the next newsletter. We hear there are 5 students selected – 2 junior boys and 3 senior girls.

 

Sport  results   -  NRL 9’s – Victorian State Finals

Intermediate Girls

  • def Mt. Ridley – 20-8
  • def Narre Warren 40-8
  • def Hampton Park 36-8
  • STATE FINAL – Melton def Mt. Ridley 12-8 in a Golden Point play    so our girls are STATE champs - again

Senior Girls (the team was depleted for a number of reasons)

  • lost to Vic Uni 4-24
  • lost to Hallam 0-32
  • lost to Dandenong

Intermediate Boys

  • lost to Hallam 12-24
  • lost to Vic Uni 8-28
  • lost to Mt. Ridley 4-20
  • def Hampton Park 20-16

Western Ranges Cross Country Results

 

Volleyball – Western Region Results

Intermediate Girls

  1. Melton def Rosehill 20/9, 20/11
  2. Melton def St. Albans 20/17, 20/7
  3. Melton lost to Point Cook Senior 20/18, 13/20, 8/15.

AFL Results – Western Ranges Division

Intermediate girls

  • Melton 4-6 def Staughton 2-1
  • Best – Trin Skenderis, Ella Tyson Lexie Leyden
  •  Goals – Nada Elmaghraby 2, Vicki Lavanda 1, Nicole Besnard 1

Intermediate Boys

  1. Melton 0-0 lost to Staughton 12-6
  2. Melton 4-7 def Kurunjang 3-3

Senior Boys

  1. Melton 11-7 def Kurunjang 1-2 – Kodie Vanek 6gls
  2. Melton 8-7 def Staughton 0-1   - “Bunnings” Sands 5gls

 Better players – Riley Theo, Harvey Green, Cody Chapman, Kodie Vanek,  Chris Mackie-Wright

 

Soccer results – Western Ranges Division

 Intermediate Girls

  1. Melton def Sunbury Downs 2-0
  2. Melton def Sunbury 3-1 to qualify for the Western Region finals

Intermediate Boys

  1. Melton def Kurunjang 4-2 (on penalties)
  2. Melton def Staughton 5-3  (on penalties)
  3. Melton def Sunbury 6-1 to qualify for the Western Region finals.

Year 7 Boys

  1. Melton def Kurunjang 1-0
  2. Melton def Gisborne 4-1 to qualify for the Western Region finals

Year 8 Boys

  1. Melton lost to Staughton 1-3
  2. Melton def Kurunjang 4-1
  3. Melton def Bacchus Marsh 2-0.

Year 7 Girls

  1. Melton 2 def Gisborne 0
  2. Melton qualifies for the Western Region finals.

Year 8 Girls

  1. Melton def Bacchus Marsh 5-0
  2. Melton lost to Kurunjang 0-7

 

Netball Results Western Ranges Division

Year 7 Girls Netball

  • Def Bacchus Marsh 11-3
  • Def Kurunjang 17-3
  • Lost to Staughton 10-17

Year 8 Girls Netball

  • Def Sunbury Downs 12-0
  • Def Kurunjang 21-1
  • Def Bacchus Marsh 24-5
  • Lost the final to Sunbury 10-23

 

Pierre De Coubertin Award

MELBOURNE, JUNE 22 – In conjunction with celebrating International Olympic Day, 185 Victorian Senior Secondary School students and State Sport Association athletes were acknowledged with the prestigious Pierre de Coubertin award.

Named after the founder of the Modern Olympic Games, the Pierre de Coubertin Award recognises students who demonstrate academic excellence and sporting prowess whilst exemplifying the Olympic values. Each award recipient must participate in sport and display the Olympic values, in particular, good sportsmanship. Melbourne’s own Nicole Livingstone OAM emceed the awards ceremony with guest speaker Rio Gold medallist, Mack Horton, also assisted with presenting students their awards.

 

The Melton Secondary College Pierre de Coubertin recipient in 2018 was Johnanne Hunt Year 12

 

A further 105 School and Sport leaders participated in an Olympic Academy preceding the awards ceremony.

 

Olympians in attendance were:

  • Dr Hannah MacDougall Beijing 2008,  Athens 2004 Swimming Paralympian Bronze Medallist
  • Koti Ngawati Rio 2016 Swimming
  • Linley Frame Barcelona 1992 Swimming
  • Pam Ryan AM MBE Tokyo 1964, Mexico 1968, Munich 1972 Athletics Silver and Bronze Medallist
  • Rayoni Nelson Sydney 2000 Badminton
  • Scotty James Vancouver 2010, Sochi 2014, PyeongChang 2018 Snowboard Bronze Medallist
  • Stephanie Moorhouse - 2004 Gymnastics

Melton SC Sport Facebook page

We have a facebook page dedicated to our Interschool Sport and the Athlete Development Program (ADP) participants. Please have a look and ‘like” us to keep up to date with the many outstanding achievements by our students in sport. The page name is - Melton Secondary College - Sport/Sport Specialism.

Melton Secondary College - Sport/Sport Specialism)

General Information 

  1. If any parent/guardian wishes to help out in the sport program please feel free to contact Mr. Darcy. You can help out as an official at the swimming and/or the athletics carnivals or assist in umpiring any of the programmed sports. Umpires are particularly helpful. Parent participation is much appreciated. A Working with Children's check is compulsory.
  2. AMART SPORTS – Melton SC has joined the community kickbacks program with Amart Sports in Woodgrove. Every time you make a purchase just mention our school and we will receive 5% of the purchase amount. If you join online you will receive a loyalty and receive discounts etc as well as already having registered our school as your preferred community kickback. We have the same arrangement with REBEL SPORTS and their Season Pass kickback.
  3. School Sport  Information

All information regarding School Sport and State team selection trials can be found on the below website – www.ssv.vic.edu.au/TeamVic.

 

Students attending schools affiliated with SSV are eligible for selection in Victorian Teams to compete in 2018 School Sport Australia National Championships.

 

Sport Dates

TERM 3

Tuesday 17 July – Netball – Senior and Intermediate Girls in Sunbury

Thursday 19 July – Cross Country – State finals

Thursday 26 July – Squash – Senior Boys and Girls State final

Tuesday 31 July – Netball – Western Region finals – Senior and Intermediate girls

Community

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Information Sessions
 

National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The NDIA is an independent statutory agency. Their role is to implement the NDIS.
 
Information for families and students who live in Brimbank Melton Area and are:

  1. Students receiving Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding for Vision Impairment;
  2. Students enrolled at a Specialist School exclusively for students with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability;
  3. Students with disability transport program (Specialist School Bus, taxi or conveyance allowance);
  4. Personal care support at school (Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding at level 4, 5 or 6; and/or Medical Intervention Support (MIS).

 
How do I know if my child is eligible for NDIS? If your child meets the age, residency and disability requirements of the NDIS and you live in the City of Brimbank or the City of Melton your child may be able to access the NDIS.
 
When and how will parents be contacted? The NDIA start date in Brimbank and Melton is October 2018. The NDIA may contact you by phone or letter before October to begin the process of access to the NDIS. Please be aware that the NDIA will call from an ‘unknown’ caller ID number and only leave a voice message if your voice mail identifies you by name. This is due to privacy concerns. If they are not able to contact you they will send you a letter. The NDIA is contacting a large number of families so you may not be immediately contacted. Your patience is appreciated.
 
What do I need to do after the NDIA contacts me?As the NDIS may fund supports and services in addition to what your child is currently receiving at school, we encourage you to respond to the NDIA as soon as they get in touch.
It is important to note the NDIS does not fund supports that relate to your child’s learning. These will still be the responsibility of schools and the education system.
If your child is eligible for the NDIS, you will be asked to work with the NDIA to develop a plan which will identify the services and support best suited to your child.
 
What will change and what won’t? Your child will be assessed for need and may be eligible for a range of supports. For now, your child’s bus to school and support for personal care needs at school will continue to be delivered in the same way. If there are changes to arrangements in the future these will be gradual and we will talk to you first. For now there is no change.
 
What if my child isn’t receiving personal care or transport? If you live in the Brimbank Melton area and your child is not currently receiving these services through the Victorian Government, and you believe they might be eligible for the NDIS, we encourage you to approach the NDIA to be assessed. You can contact the NDIA on 1800 800 110.
 
What if I don’t live in the Brimbank Melton Area? The NDIS is transitioning across Victoria, Local Government Area by Local Government Area from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2019.  To see when the Local Government Area you live in is scheduled to transition, please refer to the website: https://myplace.ndis.gov.au/ndisstorefront/about-us/our-sites/vic.1.html

 

NDIS INFORMATION SESSION – FOR FAMILIES

The NDIS is the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The NDIS start date in the Brimbank Melton Area is 1 October 2018. It is role of the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to implement the NDIS.

Parents may be interested in attending an information session if their children are:

  • Students receiving Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding for Vision Impairment;
  • Students enrolled at a Specialist School exclusively for students with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability;
  • Students with disability transport program (Specialist School Bus, taxi or conveyance allowance);
  • Personal care support at school (Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) funding at level 4, 5 or 6; and/or Medical Intervention Support (MIS).

DATES

Information sessions available to parents are as follows;

  • 31 July 2018 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at Victoria University Convention Centre

Gate 1, 460 Ballarat Road, Sunshine - Please register here via Eventbrite

  • 1 August 2018 from  6:30 to 8:30 pm at Overnewton Castle

51 Overnewton Road, Keilor - Please register here via Eventbrite

Teenage Holiday Program

 

Community Road Safety Forum

 

Youth Sports Zone

 

Melton Mail
Welbeing Brochure.pdf
The University of Melbourne - A Day at Melbourne July.docx
The University of Melbourne - A Day at Melbourne July.docx
The University of Melbourne - A Day at Melbourne July.pdf