Senior School Handbook

04 June 2018
2020
Principal's Welcome
Support for Students
Who Can Help?
Year 10
Year 10 Information
Year 10 English 
Year 10 Mathematics
Year 10 Science
Year 10 Technology
Year 10 Arts
Year 10 Humanities
Year 10 Health & PE
Year 10 Languages
Year 10 Cross Disciplinary
VCE Studies
VCE/VET Programs
External Subjects
Language and the VCE
VCE Assessment
VCE Subject Selection
Glossary of Terms
VCE English Studies
VCE Mathematics
VCE Arts
VCE Science
VCE Technology Studies
VCE Humanities
VCE Languages
VCE Health & PE
VET
Career Opportunities
VCE Pathways
Links and Resources
Melbourne Girls' College
9428 8955
Yarra Boulevard
Richmond, VIC, 3121
AU

Principal's Welcome

Dear Students and Families,

 

We are delighted to continue our work with you or to welcome you to the school.  As a community we have a commitment to personal best in learning and wellbeing, both are foundations for future success beyond the gates of Melbourne Girls’ College. The achievements of M.G.C. are certainly in academic results but a broader definition of success ensures personal, social, emotional, sporting and artistic success are central to experiences at the College.

 

The school community takes pride in teaching ethical understandings to ensure our students gain a sense of stewardship for the future and for being a positive influence on others. The knowledge in our senior education community centres on research-based best practice in both learning and wellbeing initiatives. At VCE the emphasis is on deeper learning and critical thinking in the specialised subject areas each student has chosen.

 

Our students are global citizens conscious of the unique lessons attending a school educating young people from diverse backgrounds can bring. In collaboration with our City Edge network, key tertiary and community partners in learning, MGC is an inquiring, innovative community of excellence. We very much look forward to working with you in 2020 as your young adult engages with their final years of secondary schooling.

 

Kind regards,

 

Karen Money

Principal

 

 

Support for Students

Melbourne Girls’ College offers a broad range of VCE and VET studies which cater for varied career pathways.

 

A major goal of the College is to develop in girls the skills, knowledge and confidence to become responsible citizens, leaders and decision makers and proudly assume any role available to them. To achieve this goal and to support each student’s academic program, the following activities are considered to be an integral component of education at Melbourne Girls’ College.

 

The timetable is designed so that Year 10 students have access to Unit 1/2 and VET studies, Year 11 students can enrol in Unit 3/4 studies and VET studies, and Year 12 students can access University Enhancement studies. 

Student Assemblies - Student Participation 

A regular meeting schedule of whole school assemblies, year level assemblies, house meetings and wellbeing sessions provide opportunities for student leadership and involvement in school decision-making.  Meetings are often organised and run by students as part of an extensive whole school student participation programme. There is an opportunity for students to stand for election as college captains, house captains and SRC representatives and there is also scope for membership of many committees and working groups.

Extra Curricular Activities

There are a wide range of opportunities for students to involve themselves in the broader life of the school community. Some of the Extra Curricular Activities available for students to explore include:

· AAFC 

· Aerobics

· Anime Club

· Band

· Book Club

· Choir

· Debating

· Diversity Team

· Environment Group

· Great Victorian Bike Ride

· Homework Club

· Instrumental Music

· Interact Club

· Leadership

· Peer Support

· Public Speaking

· Rowing

· Science Club

· Social Justice

· STEAM

· Interschool Sports

Managed Individual Pathways

A number of supportive programs and activities are made available to senior students at Melbourne Girls’ College to help them successfully complete secondary school and experience a smooth transition into further education, training or employment.  Each student is required to have a ‘Managed Individual Pathway’.  The Careers leader assists with pathway plans and students are encouraged to review their plan regularly in order to check their progress with meeting their goals and to seek out support where necessary. Students also listen to a range of guest speakers throughout the year, develop their careers portfolio and have individualised careers counselling.

Who Can Help?

The structure of the Senior School course at Melbourne Girls’ College has been designed to assist students achieve the maximum from their senior years of secondary education. Your Year Level Leader and Assistant Year Level Leader are available to assist you.

The Unit/Subject Teacher

The Unit teacher assists each student in their class, reminding them of methods of improvement, as well as helping them understand the area of study involved and giving clear indication of progress and satisfactory completion of tasks. Teachers are also available out-of-classes, at lunchtime/after-school to further explain concepts, discuss work and help with homework.  Regular feedback can also be found on Compass under Learning Tasks.

The Learning Area Leader

The Learning Area Leader can also be of assistance explaining information about the course and the areas of study involved. They can also assist students answering questions about course selection and pre-requisites of possible career options. They can also be approached when students wish to be further involved in the subject, for example assisting during Science week, being a Maths tutor, running lunchtime activities, organising faculty functions, etc.

The Wellbeing Centre

The Wellbeing Centre Student Services Counsellors are also available for counselling by appointment. You can make contact directly with the Counsellor or arrange this through the Year Level Leader. The Wellbeing Centre has many resources available to students from emergency accommodation to financial assistance, outside counsellors for students with personal problems to contacts with the Police & Community Services.

Your Wellbeing Teacher

In Year 10 your Wellbeing teacher is the initial contact for students during the course counselling process and will provide advice on subject selection. The Year Level Leader and Assistant Year Level Leader of Year 10, 11 and 12 are to be contacted in regard to absences or matters concerning meeting the VCE requirements.

Year Level Leaders

The Senior School Year Level Leaders can assist students to clarify the many detailed questions they may have about the VCE such as extensions, delay of decisions, special examination arrangements, etc. They often have information on sessions or courses for students to attend for the development of their skills and knowledge which will enhance their chances of success in their VCE.

 

The Year Level Leader monitors each student’s progress, both academically and personally. The Year Level Leader should be approached if there are any personal problems, school problems, and problems with the work and can refer students to counselling support. The Year Level Leader is the contact point in the school for parents with questions or concerns. The Year Level Leader is also involved in the discipline of students, should the need arise.

The Careers Leader

The Careers Leader maintains a wide range of resources from tertiary institutions and on career options in the Careers Room. They can help students with subject selection, investigating prerequisites for tertiary courses and general career research, and will also inform students of relevant events, such as Open Days at tertiary institutions, Career Expos around Melbourne and Career Information sessions to be held at the school. Much of this information is disseminated through the weekly Careers newsletter which students are recommended to read.

Year 10

 

Year 10 Information

The Year 10 Program

Students at Year 10 undertake a learning program as per the diagram below.

Year 10 students will select a program that comprises core English, Maths and Wellbeing, as well as up to 9 electives including:

  • One English elective
  • At least one Science elective
  • Up to 7 other electives 

Students at Year 10 are encouraged to select a Unit 1&2 sequence (a Year 11 subject) which will count as 2 of these elective choices. Students who elect not to study an accelerated subject will study two Year 10 electives in its place.

Wellbeing

The wellbeing of Year 10 students is critical for academic success, social relationships and a sense of belonging at Melbourne Girls’ College. Wellbeing teachers develop relationships with students to help support them through Year 10 to achieve their goals and develop and grow as young adults preparing for VCE and life after school. The program aims to foster positive relationships with peers and teachers, build the capacity to be empathetic and grateful and refine study and organizational skills.

Pathway Planning

The Year 10 Careers Program is designed to assist students to plan their pathway into VCE and beyond. This comprises of activities such as the Mock Job Interview program in partnership with Richmond Rotary Club and individual and/or group counselling session. This latter activity will aim to help students identify their learning style and strengths in not only academic but also non-academic areas of their life. It will also give them an opportunity to ask questions, seek assistance and speak about their future plans.

 

Work experience is a major thread over the whole year with a week in late November/early December concluding the Year 10 program. Students are required to find a placement that reflects a career aspiration. As a result students are strongly encouraged to start their search for a placement as early as possible.

Guidelines for Year 10 Students Who Wish To Undertake VCE/VET Units

The following VCE/VET studies are available to MGC Year 10 students:

  • Accounting
  • Australian and Global Politics
  • Biology
  • Business Management
  • Chinese 2nd Language
  • Chinese 2nd Language Advanced
  • Computing
  • Dance (by audition)
  • Drama (by audition)
  • Food and Technology
  • French
  • General Maths
  • Health and Human Development
  • Legal Studies
  • Literature
  • Media
  • Music Performance (by audition)
  • Philosophy
  • Physical Education
  • Product Design & Technology
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Studio Arts
  • 20th Century History
  • VET (subject to availability)
  • Visual Communications & Design

The Year 10 acceleration program aims to provide opportunities for students to:

  • Maximise learning experiences by undertaking the study of a 1/2 sequence in Year 10
  • Excel in an area of interest

Students interested in undertaking VCE units in Year 10 will apply through the course selection process in order to determine their eligibility for entry into a Year 11 subject. Entry into an accelerated subject is not automatic and the decision to enrol a student in an accelerated subject ultimately rests with the school. Students who wish to enrol in VCE/VET units in Year 10 will need to meet the following prerequisites to ensure that they are prepared for the demands of studying an accelerated subject: 

  • A high attendance rate for the current year in all their subjects 
  • Demonstrated commitment to study, which includes well developed time management skills, effort in all their subjects and strong organisational skills 

Year 10 English 

Semester 1

Murder Mystery                                                                                                                                                       Talking Back

True Stories                                                                                                                                                                         Horror!

Literary Classics                                                                                                                                           English Language

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Murder Mystery

What is it about the murder mystery, with its red herrings, intricate plotting, eccentric detectives, tragic victims and evil villains, that fascinates us and makes us search for a solution? The murder/mystery genre has fascinated readers and moviegoers for generations. By studying a range of novels, movies, short stories, and TV shows we will consider why mysteries and crime stories intrigue us so much. In this subject we will explore some traditional murder mysteries as well as some less conventional tales of crime and murder to see whether we can answer some of these questions.

Literary Classics

What makes a classic a classic? It’s sometimes said that Shakespeare’s plays were the equivalent of the ‘Neighbours’ of his time – written as a bit of light entertainment for ordinary people. So does that mean that ‘Neighbours’ could be the classic of tomorrow? In this subject we will study some literary classics and ask ourselves how they came to be seen that way and why such texts remain so highly regarded by readers the world over. Are they still worth reading? Are they still relevant and, if so, what messages do they have for those of us who live in the modern world?

Talking Back

We are often told “This is how you should think!” by individuals and social groups, and even by texts. Every day we are bombarded by ideas from the written, visual and spoken media, even by the novels we read and the films and television we watch. We are not always aware of how our attitudes are being shaped. But we can fight back by becoming what is known as a ‘resistant reader’. In this subject we will learn about different approaches to reading, such as feminism, Marxism and psychoanalysis, to enrich their approach to reading and writing. To illustrate these approaches we will be looking at a range of popular culture texts as well as traditional texts such as fairytales.

True Stories

Is any true story actually ‘the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth’? Don’t we all exaggerate, leave out minor details and rearrange things to make our stories sound better? In this elective we will look at a range of texts (e.g. biography/autobiography, short story, reality TV, documentary, poetry, interview, song lyrics, letters, talk shows, film) that are about real people and events. We will consider such questions as: Can any story ever be entirely ‘true’? Why do people want to reveal their lives in public? Why are some ‘true’ texts considered to be ‘history’, while others are dismissed as ‘trash’? How can there be different versions of the same story? Should we believe what we see, read, or hear?

English Language

Year 10 English language explores the mechanics of language and the role of language in society. In this elective you will consider questions such as: “Why are humans the only animal that speaks?” “What was the first language?” and “Where did English come from?” Through our language we reveal much of ourselves, and English language uncovers the reasons why we use language in the way we do. What does a footballer mean when he begins an interview with “yeah, nah…”? Why do the English find Australians aggressive when they begin a statement with “look”? Just why do some Australians their voices at the end of sentences that aren’t questions, and what do you call it? This elective will challenge you to see the English language in a new light, from Shakespeare to text messages, from Tony Abbott to Taylor Swift, and beyond.

Horror!

Why do we love stories that scare us silly? What is about stories that make then scary? Tales about monsters, aliens and supernatural beings are often clues to the deepest fears and anxieties of the society in which they are produced. They allow us to say the things we cannot say in public, but might secretly like to. They contain our hidden fears about anyone who is ‘different’. So what does it mean then that, in the past few years, books, movies and TV shows about things like vampires and zombies have been everywhere?  And did you know that the American government actually has a plan which they would use in the event of an attack by zombies? What does this all this tell us? In this subject we will look at a range of texts including, books, short stories, films and TV shows and ask ourselves whether we really should be scared after all?

Semester 2
Core English

All students will do a semester of Core English with an emphasis on introducing VCE skills. Students will study a range of print and non-print texts, including film, poetry, short stories, articles and novels. The range of texts will vary in subject matter, including Classic and Modern texts. They will respond to these texts through tasks such as Comparative and Text Response essays, focussing on character and themes, as well as text construction and conventions. There will be a Creative Writing unit where students will be asked to share their own experiences and learn how to develop these into a short story. Students will focus on the use of Persuasive Language, particularly how to analyse language in writing. Students will be encouraged to learn key study habits and approaches for VCE English, as well as exam preparation.

Semester 1 and 2
English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Curriculum Focus: All students will complete two semesters of English as an Additional Language. The subject will include the study of one print text, one non-print text, and the analysis of a media issue. The particular focus of this course will be on the development of the key skills needed for VCE English as an Additional Language. As well as developing competence in the linguistic aspects of the English Language, students will also become increasingly aware of the culturally diverse practices, values and expectations of Australian society.

Learning Outcomes: Students will study a range of print and non-print texts, including an in-depth study of two set texts. They will respond to these texts, as well as to the themes and issues raised by the particular genre they are studying, in both written and oral formats. Analytical skills will be developed using print media texts.

Year 10 Mathematics

Mathematics Pathway Options

Students in Year 10 are advised to select their mathematics subjects carefully and note that Consumer Mathematics does not provide a pathway to Year 11 Mathematics.

 

Students wishing to take Specialist Mathematics in Year 11 should take Advanced Maths in Year 10.

Advanced Mathematics 1 & 2 -Semester 1 & 2

In Advanced Mathematics 1&2, students expand upon their knowledge, skills and understanding through the content strands of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability and Functions. The curriculum focus is on students becoming proficient in mathematical understanding, fluency, reasoning and problem solving.  Students will also be required to become adept at using the CAS calculator (refer to booklist) as a tool for solving mathematical problems. These proficiencies will prepare students for the full range of VCE mathematics subjects; Specialist Mathematics, Mathematical Methods and General Mathematics. It is, however, especially designed for those students wanting to prepare for Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics in VCE. This course is recommended only to students who have completed Year 9 mathematics to a high standard.  

Mainstream Mathematics 1 & 2 -Semester 1 & 2

In Mainstream Mathematics 1&2 students expand upon their knowledge, skills and understanding through the content strands of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. The focus is on students becoming proficient in mathematical understanding, fluency, reasoning and problem solving.  Students will also be required to become adept at using the CAS calculator (refer to booklist) as a tool for solving mathematical problems. These proficiencies will prepare students for the VCE mathematics subjects of General Mathematics or Mathematical Methods. This course is recommended only to students who have completed Year 9 mathematics to a reasonable standard.  

General Mathematics 1 & 2 -Semester 1 & 2

In General Mathematics, students expand upon their knowledge, skills and understanding through the content strands of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, Statistics and Probability. The curriculum focus is on students becoming more proficient in mathematical understanding, fluency, reasoning and problem solving that will be needed as preparation for General Mathematics as well as mathematics they will encounter in every day life. The topics covered will include Linear Algebra, Trigonometry, Indices, Polygons, Using Statistics, Budgeting and Banking, Compound Interest and Chance and Quality Control.

Consumer Mathematics 1 & 2 -Semester 1 &/or 2

In Consumer Mathematics, students expand upon their knowledge, skills and understanding through the content strands of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. The curriculum focus is on students becoming more proficient in mathematical understanding, fluency, reasoning and problem solving that they will need in their day to day lives.  Students selecting this subject will be unable to do a mathematics course at VCE. The topics covered will include Using Statistics, Budgeting and Banking, Compound Interest and Chance and Quality Control. This subject can be taken in either semester or both semesters.

 

Year 10 Science

Science at Year 10

Students will select at least one science elective at Year 10. Students who choose to accelerate by studying a Unit 1/2 Science subject are still expected to study a semester of year 10 Science in an alternative field.

 

 

Biology (Single Semester)

Students will investigate how macromolecules are involved in the structure and function of the cell. They will explore the mechanisms involved in protein production from the genetic code. They will investigate cell division for growth, repair and sexual reproduction. Some forms of inheritance will be explored. Students will explore the process of natural selection and use the evolution of microorganisms as a case study. Advances in biotechnology will be addressed throughout.

Chemistry (Single Semester)

This unit will investigate the periodic table to identify trends in properties such as metallic nature, atomic size and electronegativity.  A study of atomic structure and substructure will reinforce an atom's position in the periodic table and students will be required to complete electron configurations. Bonding models will be introduced to highlight properties exhibited by metallic, ionic & covalent bonding types. The five basic reaction types in chemistry will be introduced with students required to balance equations to conserve atoms in reactions. Students will also be introduced to organic chemistry.

Physics (Single Semester)

Students will investigate and experience a wide range of physical phenomena related to electricity and magnetism.  A conceptual approach is taken within a context that encourages students to express, question and test their existing understanding and apply what they have learnt.  Students will learn to describe and explain how the operation of simple DC circuits can be explained by the concept of potential difference and current. The interaction of magnets will be explained using a field model and the manner in which magnets are used in the generation of electricity and the operation of electric motors will also be investigated. “An exploration of modern developments in our understanding of motion, space, and time will be made using Einstein's concept of Spacetime. These concepts form the foundation for the study of VCE Physics.

Environmental Issues and Actions (Single Semester)

This environmentally-focused course is comprised of two units. During the first unit, Energy and Climate Change, students investigate both renewable and non-renewable energy resources and consider their impacts on the environment. They also develop an understanding of ecological footprints. The second unit, Biodiversity, focuses on the potential impact we as consumers have on the environment through the choices we make, including the effects of energy consumption, agriculture and the impacts and ethics associated with raising animals for human consumption.

 

 

Year 10 Technology

Interior Design Furniture (Single Semester)

Interior design is about assessing a personal space of your choice and designing and improving the feel of the area by creating a piece of furniture or a product that will enhance this environment. We interact with products every day of our lives, we sit on chairs, we store items in containers, we turn on lamps to alter the feel of a room, all these things impact on our wellbeing. You will experiment with various methods of construction that use a range of equipment/machinery, including the laser cutter. Items such as a small ottoman, a stool, shelf, lamp, wall light are examples of some of the types of products that you could design and create.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $80.00 per semester.**

Costume Design (Single Semester)

In Costume Design you will design and create a costume for a specific character in a production. You will explore a range of materials and techniques as you develop and refine your ideas. You will create your own character and design and make a costume to suit them and the theme of the production. You will use a sewing machine, follow and adapt patterns and experiment with methods of construction and surface embellishment.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $80.00 per semester.**

 

Jewellery Design (Single Semester)

Jewellery Design focuses on the design and creation of your own unique jewellery pieces. You will be introduced to a variety of materials and techniques used by professional designers to construct, decorate and finish jewellery. You will become familiar with processes such as saw-piercing, silver soldering, casting, roll-pressing, sublimation printing and constructing linkages and findings.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $80.00 per semester.**

 

Food For Life (Food Technology) (Single Semester)

In Food for Life, you will expand your knowledge of food through both practical and theory classes. You will explore the relationships that exist between social factors and food access and choice with consideration to the environment and sustainability. You will also be required to prepare healthy meals suitable for different population groups within Australia along with investigating food intolerances, food allergies and various aspects of nutrition. Throughout the unit, you will have opportunities to adapt and individualise some recipes.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $130.00 per semester.**

 

Year 10 Arts

Dance (Single Semester)

The Year 10 Dance elective focuses on choreographing and developing a unified composition. In this unit students will explore the use of Dance elements and how to structure dances based on themes and narrative. Students will build on their dance skill in technique classes and will also develop performance craft. Group dynamics is also developed and this will allow students to create a unified composition. Students will have the opportunity to display their work at a performance at the end of the semester.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $150.00 per semester.**

 

Drama (Single Semester)

The study of drama focuses on the development of expressive and performance skills and the development and performance of imagined characters. Drama provides students with the opportunity to examine, explore and make meaning of a range of social, political, cultural and historical contexts and give them a dramatic form. Students explore the collaborative process and play making techniques to create group performances. Theatrical Conventions and Dramatic Elements are studied to apply to performance work. Performance work created by students will culminate in an evening performance for family and friends.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $40.00 per semester.**

Music (Single Semester)

Year 10 Music is a precursor to VCE Music Performance however it is not a prerequisite.

The unit focuses on developing students’ performance skills in both ensembles and as a soloist. The area of aural comprehension, recognition of elements of music, creative organization, composition and analysis of music encourages students to develop a greater understanding of the complexities and creative potential within the artistic medium of music. Students intending to take this subject should have skills in using an instrument or singing. The unit culminates with a performance evening.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of  $20.00 per semester.**

 

 

Media (Single Semester)

The media surround us and have a major impact on our daily lives. We are bombarded by both the medium and the message. In this unit students will be examining the role of the media and how it affects them. We will examine the workings, cultural significance and influence of celebrity, TV news and documentary. We will look at film as a medium and complete practical work on video, computer and other production areas..

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of  $60.00 per semester.**

 

Visual Communication & Design (Single Semester)

The focus of this unit will be to develop 2D and 3D drawing and rendering skills, encourage the use of a design process and develop an understanding of the design elements and principles through analysis and design practice. An understanding and appreciation of the role of aesthetics, function and drawing conventions in design will be encouraged and developed through the maintenance of a workbook and ongoing evaluation of design ideas and solutions. The course will cover Information, Environmental and Product Design.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of  $60.00 per semester.**

Event Management (Single Semester)

This subject explores the non-performance aspects of the Performing Arts. Students will be given practical training in Lighting, Sound, Stage Management, Publicity and Event Management Administration. During the semester the class will be required to work in teams to promote and stage a series of events for the MGC community. Examples include: Assemblies, Open Mic Sessions and Radio Broadcasts, Concerts, Performance Evenings and Productions. Students will develop leadership and organisational skills and the semester will culminate in designing and organising an event of their choice.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of  $25.00 per semester.**

Visual Art (Single Semester)

The artistic process is one of design, creation and reflection. In this unit students will move through a range of artistic activities (both traditional and contemporary). This unit will focus on the creative process; students will complete a folio, a body of work in a variety of mediums and evaluate their work. As in all good artistic endeavours, theory informs our practice and our practice informs our understanding of theory. In this unit students will also choose to study the work of a variety of artists who work in different fields and with different mediums.

Note:  There is a fee associated with this course of  $50.00 per semester.**

 

Year 10 Humanities

Myths and Legends (Single Semester)

This course aims to explore the spectacular myths that underpin the foundations of ancient civilisations. Students will examine the power of myths, which unlock the secrets of tradition, beliefs, and culture. They will analyse traditional historical legends and evaluate the urban adaptations and how they have influenced modern literature and culture. This course gives students the opportunity to investigate the internal conflicts of great warriors such as Achilles and King Arthur of Camelot, whilst also studying and setting in which their external conflicts take place. This unit focuses on research, discussion and primary/secondary source material and will provide a sound preparation for VCE History units. On completion of this unit, students will be able to comprehend and analyse a range of historical material, have an understanding of change and continuity over time, and construct, substantiate and evaluate theories.

Note: There is a fee associated with this unit of $10.00 per semester.**

Consumerism and Law (Single Semester)

This course aims to build and consolidate students’ knowledge of economic and legal concepts, skills and values. This will equip them with a greater awareness and understanding of Australia’s economy and government within a global context. Students will critically analyse issues that affect Australia’s economy and discuss the effect these have upon the standard of living; directly relating these issues back to their personal lives. They will deepen their understanding of how trade, exchange and markets impact Australia’s economy and how globalisation has shaped and altered the global economy. Students will develop skills that allow them to develop expertise at managing their own personal finances; allowing them to recognise the value of savings and ethical consumption. Students will gain a working knowledge of Australia’s political system and the factors that underpin Australia’s system of democracy. They will explore the function of the law and the role that it plays in everyday life.

Note: There is a fee associated with this unit of $20.00 per semester.**

Refugees, Rights & Radical Regimes (Single Semester)

What are human rights? How are regimes like North Korea and Syria infringing on human rights? Where are refugees coming from? How is Australia dealing with the current refugee crises? This course gives students the opportunity to engage in the exploration of current global conflicts and disasters, and examine the effectiveness of the responses to the refugee crises by global actors. From primary and secondary sources, students look at historical conflicts that have led to refugee populations, radical regimes that cause their population to either fight or take flight, and Australia’s 20th and 21st century refugee and migration policies.    

Explosive Decades (Single Semester)

This unit provides students with an insight into the turbulent and exciting decades of Australia and the world from the 1950s to 1980s. The study will focus on The Cold War period and the Indigenous Civil Rights Movement (in the US and Australia), through research, discussion and use of primary sources. This will enable students to under-stand the post-war period, the social and political world of the time, how it has changed and how it might change in the future, providing a sound preparation for VCE Units.

International Studies (Single Semester)

There are wide variations between the conditions of material life experienced by human populations. This unit allows students to use different forms of measurement and evaluation to analyse global disparities with a view to developing an international perspective. Students then investigate global issues such as the status of women, climate change, refugees and conflicts. The role of the United Nations is reviewed and evaluated in the light of specific case studies. Increasing general knowledge is an important aim in this unit.

 

Misdemeanours & Retributions (Single Semester)

What is a misdemeanour? What is retribution? Do they mean the same thing to everyone all the time? This unit takes a practical approach to exploring the way in which societies deal with the rehabilitation of both criminals and victims. Students will consider the questions above as they examine cases of historical and social significance. Each student selects an aspect of misdemeanours and retribution that interests them and completes an in-depth investigation. This will include conducting opinion surveys and gathering sources of data for analysis. Students will present their findings on this form of justice at a parliamentary style Law Reform inquiry.

Philosophy: The Meaning of Life (Single Semester)

This unit introduces students to philosophical thinking through literature, film and art. Students will study a range of texts or cultural representations in order to explore the fundamental questions about the nature of reality and the purpose of existence. A central aim of this unit is to develop in students a capacity for higher order thinking and an interest in ideas. It will also provide students with a foundation for entry into VCE Philosophy.

Year 10 Health & PE

IEP: Introduction to Exercise Physiology
(Single Semester)

Are you interested in fitness? Are you active? Would you love more physical activity in your school week? Are you goal oriented? Are you curious about the body and how it moves and works? Then IEP is for you! Designed as a great pathway towards VCE Physical Education, the main focus of IEP is on giving students the chance to design and implement their own fitness program. Students will use the MGC Fitness Centre and also participate in group fitness classes at local fitness and training venues. The theory covered to complement the practical classes focuses on:

  •  Fitness components, fitness testing, training principles and training methods
  •  Musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and energy systems.
  •  Sports Nutrition

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $75.00 per semester.  The cost covers all the group fitness sessions with an instructor.**

SAMS: Sports Action Management (Single Semester)

Are you interested in coaching? Can you see yourself umpiring junior AFL stars in the middle of the MCG in front of 90,000 spectators? Do you love getting involved in Sporting Events? SAMS is for you!

Sports Action and Management is a highly practical course which focusses on applying the principles behind event and sports management. Throughout the course students will organize, coach and umpire sporting events and be involved in raising the profile of sport at MGC.

The following topics are addressed through this unit:

  •  Coaching
  • AFL Basic Umpiring Course – Certificate awarded
  •  Umpiring an AUSKICK match at half time during an AFL game
  •  Sports Psychology
  •  Performance Management
  •  Sports Injuries and Management

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $40.00 per semester.**

The cost covers the delivery of the AFL Umpiring training and certificate.**

YLYC: Your Life, Your Choice (Single Semester)

Your Life Your Choice is a combination of Health and Physical Education. This class is a follow on from junior Health and Physical Education and a good lead in to Health and Human Development. This subject gives students practical knowledge to lead healthy and active lives. This unit covers the following content:

  • Recreational drugs that are becoming more prevalent and their risks and effects
  • Developing healthy relationships and taking responsibility for yourself
  • Recognising dangers and developing strategies to help students make educated decisions/choices
  • Fitness for VCE
  • Primary School Teaching
  • Your favourite PE lessons from junior years.
  • Nutrition for health and wellbeing

OE: Outdoor Education (Single Semester)

Do you want to be the next Steph Gilmore or Sally Fitzgibbon (surfers)? Would you like the chance to watch the sun rise and set in a beautiful mountain or coastal setting? Do you want to sleep under the stars? Do you like new and challenging activities in the Great Outdoors? Then Outdoor Education is for you! The Year 10 Outdoor Education program is a great introduction and foundation for VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Units 3 & 4 (offered in year 11 at MGC). Students will participate in a range of practical classes including kayaking, hiking in the Dandenong Ranges, Swimming and Lifesaving, camp cooking, tent pitching and packing an overnight hike pack. The range of theory topics include Australian ecosystems, risk and safety in the outdoors, current environmental issues, navigation and predicting weather and environmental case studies. At the conclusion of the unit, each student should have developed a wider understanding and experience of outdoor environments and the issues these environments face for their continuing health and survival. Students should also be able to identify and use a range of minimal impacts practices in outdoor environments.  Students should be able to identify, assess and reduce risks in specific environments and make sound decisions for both themselves and their group to keep themselves safe. Each student should be able to participate in, challenge themselves and improve their skill levels with the outdoor activities provided in the course.

 

Due to the highly practical nature of this subject, there is a cost of approximately $565 per year to cover the cost of 1 half day hike—1000 steps at Mt Dandenong, 3 day Surf camp – Anglesea, 3 day Hike Camp – Mt Stirling and 2 swimming/lifesaving sessions.

Please note: If a student withdraws from this elective or does not attend a camp/activity, there may be no refund. Please refer to the schools’ refund policy for further information. **

 

 

Year 10 Languages

French (Semester 1 & 2)

In Year 10 French students will study topics of relevance and interest including healthy living, life in times gone by, relationships and future career and aspirations. By the end of the year students will be much more able to express themselves effectively in written and spoken French as more tenses are taught. Students will continue to explore the cultural aspects that are relevant to the topics covered. Students will be prepared for the academic aspect of VCE study. Their listening, reading, writing and speaking skills will all be strengthened.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $25.00 per year.**

 

Chinese (Semester 1 & 2)

In Year 10 Chinese students will study topics of relevance and interest including school life, leisure and entertainment, travel, birthday celebrations and festivals. By the end of the year students will be much more able to express themselves effectively in written and spoken Chinese. Students will continue to explore the cultural aspects that are relevant to the topics covered. Students will be prepared for the academic aspect of VCE study. Their listening, reading, writing and speaking skills will all be strengthened.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $35.00 per year.**

 

Year 10 Cross Disciplinary

Digital Worlds (Single Semester)

In this unit students will explore how digital technologies are coming together to create new ways of working and communicating. They will learn how to use specific software packages to create animations and games as well as learn the basics of computer programming. Students will have the opportunity to work in teams to design, code, and publish app’s, websites, and other digital products. Other areas of the digital landscape that are explored are the ethics regarding the use of technology and data, the fundamentals of cyber security and how to protect against hackers, and how ubiquitous computing effects society now and into the future.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $10.00 per semester.**

 

Extended Investigation (Single Semester)

In 2013, VCAA trialled a Unit 3&4 subject called Extended Investigation. A simpler version of this study is being offered to Year 10 students in 2019 to prepare them for the possible selection of this subject in 2020 as a Year 12 study.

The Year 10 Extended Investigation introduces students to different paradigms of knowledge development and will require students to develop their research skills and conduct an independent research investigation in a chosen area of interest. The investigation could take an experimental design, for areas of science or engineering, or a naturalistic approach to answer a research question from psychology or history, for example. Students will develop a challenging research question and conduct a review of relevant literature. Students will then develop a plan to conduct their own research and how best to present and communicate their findings. The final assessment task will be a detailed thesis of the semester’s research. The skills developed in this course are easily transferable to any educational or vocational setting.

 

VCE Studies

Curriculum Structure

A broad range of VCE studies are available to students in the Senior School. VCE Studies are those approved by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA). Year 10 students are eligible to choose VCE units through the subject selection process.

 

At Melbourne Girls' College we run a 2 week timetable with 4 x 75 minute periods per day. A breakdown of the senior school learning programs are detailed below.

Year 11 Students who are not studying an accelerated Unit 3/4 subjects will choose a Unit 1/2 subject in its place.

VCE Subjects available

The following VCE studies are available at Melbourne Girls’ College:

Accounting

Australian and Global Politics

Biology

Business Management

Chemistry

Computing

Dance

Drama

English

English as an Additional Language

English Language

Environmental Science

Food and Technology

General Mathematics 1 and 2

Further Mathematics 3 and 4

Health and Human Development

History

Legal Studies

Literature

Language (Chinese or French)

Media

Mathematical Methods

Music Performance*

Outdoor and Environmental Studies*

Philosophy

Physics

Physical Education

Product Design and Technology

Psychology

Specialist Mathematics

Sociology

Studio Arts*

Visual Communication and Design

*Note:

  • Outdoor and Environmental Studies is offered at the Unit 3/4 only to Year 11 students.
  • Studio Art offer two courses of this study - both are identical studies but media specific. See course descriptions for further information.
  • Music Performance is offered  as Solo or Group for Units 3/4.

 

Unit 3/4 Acceleration


In order to determine their eligibility for entry into an accelerated subject, current Year 10 students who are completing a Unit 1/2 subject will need to apply through the course selection process. Entry into an accelerated subject is not automatic and the decision to enrol a student in an accelerated subject ultimately rests with the school. Students who wish to continue with their accelerated subject will need to meet the following prerequisites to ensure that they are prepared for the demands of studying a Unit 3/4 subject:

  • A high attendance rate for the current year in all their subjects 
  • Demonstrated commitment to study, which includes well developed time management skills, effort in all their subjects and strong organisational skills 
  • A high level of achievement in their current Unit 1/2 subject 

VCE/VET Programs

What do I have to do to get my VCE?

The VCE is a senior secondary certificate of education designed to be completed by school students over a minimum of two years. Units 1 and 2 can be completed as single units and Units 3 and 4 must be taken as a sequence in the same calendar year.

 

The VCE is awarded on the basis of satisfactory completion of units according to the following requirements:

  • Satisfactory completion of a minimum of sixteen (16) units of study across Year 11 and 12 which must include:
  • Three units from the English Group including a Unit 3-4 sequence.
  • At least three sequences of Unit 3-4 Studies other than English

Note: The three units of English including a 3-4 sequence may include units from across the English group.

 

Students in Year 11 may choose from the following English Units:

  • Semester 1: Unit 1 English, English Language, Literature or EAL
  • Semester 2: Unit 2 English, English Language, Literature or EAL

Please refer to the English section of the VCE Studies section of this booklet for further details.

 

In Year 12 students must study a sequence of English units.

 

The Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) advises that for the calculation of a students’ Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR), satisfactory completion of both Units 3 and 4 of an English sequence are required.

VET Programs

VET (Vocational Education Training) in schools program combines general VCE studies with vocational training and experience in the workforce. VET programs have become fully integrated into the VCE. This means that they have been developed as independent studies at Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 level. All VET programs have full VCE study status.

 

VET provides additional breadth to the VCE and gives students a nationally recognised training credential endorsed by industry and an ability to articulate into further education and training courses.

  • VCE VET units contribute a Unit 1-4 sequence in their own right for the completion of VCE.
  • Up to two of the three sequences other than English can be approved VCE VET Unit 3 and 4 sequences.
  • Full VCE study scores are now available for most VET Units 3 and 4.
  • VET subjects must be started at either the beginning of Year 10 or Year 11 and cannot be picked up part-way through the year.

Attendance Requirements

To satisfactorily complete a unit, a student is expected to attend all timetabled classes. Where a student has completed work but there has been a substantive breach of class attendance, the student may be awarded an N.

 

The only types of absence that will not be used as part of the attendance requirement calculations are:

an approved absence due to extenuating circumstances, e.g. Funeral of family member or a school based activity to which approval has been granted. 

 

For an absence to be classed as 'approved', an authorised, correctly dated medical certificate is required. A note from a parent/guardian is NOT acceptable,

How Do I Gain Tertiary Entry?

The VCE is the foundation qualification for entry to all tertiary institutions. You should check at the start of the year that you're doing the correct subjects for entry into your projected course. Your results on your school assessed coursework, school assessed tasks (where applicable) and other requirements and examinations will determine tertiary entry for 2021/2022/2023.

External Subjects

Victorian School of Languages

The Victorian School of Languages offer a wide range of languages not currently available at MGC. These include Russian, Vietnamese, Ukrainian, and Hindi to name a few. Students are required to attend weekend classes, and a fee is charged to the family. See your Year Level Leader for more information on how to go about enrolling in a subject through VSL: https://www.vsl.vic.edu.au/.

Virtual School Victoria and College of Adult Education

Students are sometimes able to enrol in subjects not offered at MGC at Virtual School Victoria and the College of Adult Education. However, permission must be obtained from the Principal and a fee is charged by Virtual School Victoria. If you are considering a Distance Education subject you MUST see the Year Level Leader for further information.

 

Please refer to the Distance Education Policy on the MGC website for further details.

Extension Studies in the VCE

VCE students may have the opportunity to undertake a first-year university subject as part of their VCE Year 12 program. Extension studies are aimed at challenging the most able students. Melbourne University, Monash University and other tertiary institutions offer extension studies. Successful completion of a university study as part of the Extension Studies program currently entitles students to an increment on their aggregate score, depending on how well they pass. Students attend classes and a number of on-campus sessions during each semester.

Language and the VCE

Do I qualify for English as an
Additional Language (EAL)?

A student may be eligible for EAL status:

  • if you have been in Australia for less than 7 years on January 1st of the year you begin Year 12 then you are eligible for EAL status (English as an Additional Language). If you came after January 1st 2013, you are eligible for EAL status in 2020.
  • if English has been your major language of instruction for a total period of not more than seven (7) years over the period of your education. The period of 7 years is calculated cumulatively over the students’ whole life.

Please see your Year Level Leader if you believe you fit these criteria.

Language Studies and the ATAR

As a result of government policy to encourage the study of Language, the mean of each Language is adjusted up by adding 5 to the ATAR subject score mean for Units 3 and 4. This process is independent of scaling applied to all subjects. It does not imply that all Language students receive an increase of 5 ATAR points. Information is available at http://www.vtac.edu.au/pdf/publications/abcofscaling.pdf

Enrolment in Study of Language - Second Language

VCE Second Language studies in Chinese, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Korean and Japanese are designed to cater for students who have learnt all they know of the language in an Australian school or a similar environment.

All enrolments in VCE Second Language Studies Units 3 and 4 must be approved by VCAA.  Eligibility is determined on the basis of three criteria: Students MUST inform the Year 12 Level Leader in the August of the year prior to commencing studies in Second Language Studies Units 3 & 4.  Evidence must include:

  • Country of residence from the date of the student’s 5th birthday
  • Language of full time schooling
  • Hours of study in the Language per week.

VCE Assessment

How do I satisfactorily complete a unit?

Learning outcomes set by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) is the basis of satisfactory completion of VCE Units. Each VCE unit includes a set of two to four outcomes. The award of satisfactory completion of a unit is based on a decision that the student has demonstrated achievement of the outcomes. This decision will be based on the teacher’s assessment of the student’s performance on assessment tasks and class based activities designated for the unit. The school, in accordance with the VCAA requirements determines satisfactory completion of units. The VCAA supplies schools with assessment guidelines for each subject: http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/index.aspx 

Assessment of Units 1 and 2

Satisfactory completion at the Unit 1/2 level requires that students achieve the set of outcomes specified for each unit. The Learning Area Leader and classroom teachers for that subject will determine the assessment tasks and the level of achievement in accordance with guidelines determined by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority each year.

 

For satisfactory completion of each Unit 1/2 VCE subject, students must demonstrate their achievement of the set of outcomes as specified in the study design. The decision about satisfactory completion of outcomes is based on the teacher’s assessment of the student’s overall performance on assessment tasks designated for the unit. 

 

In order to receive a Satisfactory (S) for a Unit 1 and 2 VCE subject, a student must:

  • produce work that demonstrates achievement of the outcomes
  • submit work on time 
  • submit work that is clearly their own
  • adhere to the college’s attendance requirements ​

Assessment of Units 3 and 4

Unlike Units 1 and 2, Units 3 and 4 are connected and must be studied in order and together as a sequence. For each study, students’ level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 sequences is assessed using school-based assessment and external examinations.  Each study has three assessment components in each Unit 3 and 4 sequence. Each study includes at least one examination.

 

The weighting of examinations varies from subject to subject. These assessments will be reported as grades A+ to UG. For a detailed description of assessment in each subject, refer to the appropriate section in the handbook. Additional information is available in the relevant study design for each subject. This is available through the subject pages of the VCAA website.

School Assessment

There are two forms of school assessment, school assessed coursework (SAC) and school assessed tasks (SAT). The form or forms of school assessment and their weighting is specified for each study.

 

1. School Assessed Coursework

  • Is made up of a number of assessment tasks that are specified by the study design.
  • Is used to assess the unit learning outcomes.
  • Is part of the regular teaching and learning program.
  • Is completed mainly in class in a specified time frame.

2. School Assessed Tasks

A small number of studies will have school-assessed tasks (SATs). They are used in studies where products and models are to be assessed: Art, Media, Studio Arts, Food and Technology, Product Design and Technology and Visual Communication and Design. Results of these school assessments will count towards your study score in each VCE study and ultimately towards your Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).

 

Obtaining an “S” in a unit is predicated upon students meeting all outcomes for that unit. This is not normally a concern unless attendance issues interfere with this. Therefore students should attend all timetabled classes in order for teachers to be able to attest that the student has met the unit outcomes.

Although all studies at Units 1- 4 in the VCE are subject to overview from the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), this is particularly true at Units 3 and 4 due to the requirement for a level playing field across all schools in the system. This ensures that Study Scores are truly a reflection of student’s aptitude in the study.

 

At Unit 3 and 4 level, part of all studies are School Assessed Coursework (SACs) or School Assessed Tasks (SATs) which are used to assess performance of students during the year. The amount that these components contribute to the Study Score varies across studies but it is always a significant proportion.

SACs and SATs are often used (in conjunction with other school based activities) to assess satisfactory performance (S or N). In addition they also assist students to improve subject knowledge and give an indication of what is to be expected in exams at the end of the year. Finally they are a way of determining rank order of the student cohort of the study concerned. It is for this reason that the school must act in such a way to provide a fair way of deciding a performance ranking. This means that:

  • Published dates for submission of drafts / assessment tasks must be strictly adhered to. Failure to do so without adequate explanation could mean that the task is not commented upon or not assessed. In the latter case a zero would result for this component of the School Assessed Coursework.
  • Extensions to due dates generally will not be made without appropriate documentation. This could be a medical certificate or similar document completed by a professional in the field.
  • Where an extension is granted, the assessment must be completed as soon as practicable after the original due date.
  • Students and families must keep the Year 12 Year Level Leader/Assistant Leader advised of any issue that may impact on classroom performance generally and SAC/SAT performance in particular.
  • Some students will be given Special Provision in terms of the conditions under which they complete SACs/SATs. 

VCE Assessment Protocols: School Assessed Coursework & Tasks

Information for MGC Students & Families

 

Students are required to observe the following protocols for the conduct of School Assessed Coursework (SAC) and School Assessed Tasks (SAT). These are in line with the rules and expectations of the VCAA (VCAA assessment protocols can be found through the VCAA Exam Navigator which is updated annually for each assessment period.

 

  1. Students must not take any action that gives or attempts to give them or another student an unfair advantage in an assessment.
  2. Students must obey and observe all proper instructions or directions given by their supervisor.
  3. Students must not possess mobile phones and electronic devices that are capable of storing, receiving or transmitting information or electronic signals, such as recorded music and video players, organizers, dictionaries and computerized watches during any assessment.
  4. Students detected with any device defined in Rule 2 must, upon the direction of the supervisor, surrender that device. The assessment at this point will cease to continue and the student in breach of the rules will be referred to their Year Level Leader.
  5. Students must not communicate with any other student while the assessment is being conducted.
  6. Students must not share any of the following items during an assessment: calculator, dictionary, bound reference or stationery.
  7. Students must not remove any response material, used or unused, from the assessment room.
  8. Students must remain silent and seated in their place at the end of the assessment until response materials have been collected, checked and they have been given permission to leave the room.
  9. Students are not permitted to bring bags of any kind into an assessment. Notes and books are not permitted into any assessment unless it falls under the category of being an approved material.
  10. Bottled water is permitted in any assessment. The water must be in a transparent plastic bottle (all labels removed). Water bottles must not be placed on the table at any time and must not be shared between students.
  11. Students must raise their hand if they wish to communicate with a supervisor.
  12. Students are not permitted to leave the assessment before the end of writing time.
  13. Students are not permitted to mark their assessment paper in any way during the allocated reading time.
  14. The start of reading time, the start of writing time and the end of writing time will be written on the whiteboard for any assessment. Students may refer to the clock in the classroom for time elapsed. The supervisor will give a 5-min warning prior to the end of the assessment time.
  15. Students must cease writing when instructed to do so by a supervisor.
  16. Students completing a subject where SATs are a component of assessment must attend all scheduled authentication meetings to demonstrate their progress and process.
  17. Students must attend all scheduled classes on the day of an assessment*. Should a student be absent from any class on the day of an assessment, a medical certificate explaining this absence is required.

*Assessment includes: a SAC, submission date of a SAT or Folio.

 

All authentication issues and breaches of rules will be investigated and dealt with in accordance to VCAA rules as outlined in the VCE and VCAL Administrative Handbook.

 

APPROVED MATERIALS

 

Students are permitted to bring basic stationery items into any written assessment. This includes pens, pencils, highlighters, erasers, sharpeners and rules.

  • Pencil cases can only be brought into the assessment if they are transparent (i.e.) the contents are visible to the supervisor.
  • Correction fluid/tape and loose sheets of paper are not allowed in any assessment.
  • For assessments where students are permitted to bring additional specific materials, subject teachers will notify students prior to the assessment. 

DICTIONARIES

  • Dictionaries are only allowed in English, English as an Additional Language (EAL) and Languages written assessments.
  • Dictionaries may be consulted during reading and writing time.
  • In English and EAL assessments, a printed English and/or bilingual dictionary may be used.
  • In the written component of a Languages assessment, any printed monolingual and/or bilingual dictionary in one or two separate volumes may be used.
  • Dictionaries may not contain any highlighting, annotation or tabs that are not part of the original publication.
  • A thesaurus or a dictionary that contains a thesaurus in the same volume is not permitted in any assessment.
  • Dictionaries may not be shared between students during an assessment.
  • Electronic dictionaries are not permitted in any assessment.

ABSENCES

  • If a student is absent from an assessment, they must communicate this to both their Classroom Teacher and Year Level Leader (YLL).
  • Absences from test-based assessments require a medical certificate to be provided to the YLL (as soon as the student returns to school following their absence). The missed assessment will then be scheduled for the closest time to the original assessment through the YLL.
  • Students must attend all timetabled classes on the day that an assessment needs to be completed or submitted. If a student is absent for any part of the day during a scheduled assessment, a medical certificate must be provided for the absence. 
  • If a student knows of their absence prior to an assessment, they are required to complete the assessment before their absence (prior to the original scheduled date). 
  • If a student is absent on the day an assessment is due for submission (i.e.) essay, folio submission, performance etc., a medical certificate is required to be provided to the YLL. The task should then be submitted in the next lesson that the student is present.
  • Failure to provide appropriate documentation to the YLL (in a timely manner) places students at risk of receiving zero for the task.  Demonstration of the outcomes still needs to occur for students to receive an ‘S’ – this task will be arranged with the YLL and Classroom Teacher.

LATE WORK

  • The penalty for the late submission of an assessment is 10 % per day (not including weekends) up to a maximum 50 % deduction.
    • Example: A student who received 18/20 (90%) for a task but handed it in 2 days late will get 72%.
  • Any task more than 5 days late will only be assessed for S/N purposes.

Study Scores

Students’ overall achievement for each study will continue to be calculated and reported as a Study Score (Relative Position) on a scale of 0 to 50. In order to qualify for a Study Score, a student must have satisfactorily met each outcome for Units 3 and 4 in that study and it must be completed in the same calendar year.

Special Provision for Unit 3 and 4 Studies

Some conditions or events in a student’s life mean that performance in exams and/or SACs can be negatively impacted upon. Special Provision is the term used for a variety of processes designed to ensure a level playing field.

 

Special Examination Arrangements

This is one of the forms of Special Provision, and can mean extra reading or writing time, rest breaks, use of a computer, taking food into an exam, a scribe, a braille paper, a separate room etc. Some of these are only possible during the GAT or end of year exams, but some can be used during SACs.

The VCAA normally requires applications for Special Examination Arrangements to be submitted in early March for conditions that are chronic or known at that time. Emergency Special Examination Arrangements are also available where a condition has arisen later in the year. In both cases, however, documentation from a professional in the field is required before the VCAA or the school will consider the application. The College will only vary conditions for students in SACs where the VCAA has already approved Special Examination Arrangements for that student.

Application forms for Special Examination Arrangements are available from the Year 12 Level Leader. It is the student’s responsibility to liaise with the Year 12 Level Leader when applying for Special Examination  Arrangements should they believe it is necessary.

 

Derived Examination Score

This is another aspect of Special Provision. Some students may miss an exam due to a traumatic event. Others may undertake an exam but due to negative changed circumstances would not be expected to perform to the level that would have been the case had the event not occurred. A Derived Examination Score (DES) is a score determined by VCAA. It is determined by looking at a variety of data including the GAT. It is designed to deal with issues that have occurred close to or in the end of year examination period. Note that a DES is approved at the discretion of the VCAA.

It is the student’s responsibility to apply for a DES should they believe it is necessary, and application forms are available from the Year 12 Year Level Leader. Similar to Special Exam Arrangements, documentation from a professional in the field is required before the application would be favourably considered. 

VCE Subject Selection

Entry to both Unit 1/2 and Unit 3/4 studies can be subject to school based performance quotas instituted to maximize student success in the studies. Students may enrol in one, and in some cases two VCE/VET subject above their year level. This includes subjects taken via Distance Education or VSL.

 

At Melbourne Girls' College we run a 2 week timetable with 4 x 75 minute periods per day. A breakdown of the senior school learning programs are detailed below.

 

VCE Program at MGC

All students at Melbourne Girl's College will undertake a full time program, for example;

 

Standard Program

Year 11                           6 Unit 1/2 Subjects

Year 12                           5 Unit 3/4 Subjects

 

Accelerated Program                        

Year 11                           1 Unit 3/4 Subject, 5 Unit 1/2 Subjects

Year 12                           5 Unit 3/4 Subjects or 

                                          4 Unit 3/4 Subjects and 1 University Enhancement course

Glossary of Terms

This is just a brief introduction to the language of the senior school. More details will be progressively given throughout the year by the Year Level Leader, the Careers Coordinator and other members of staff

 

Appeal

There are several avenues open for students to appeal about their results, decisions made and penalties.  So many in fact, that if you feel you have some grounds to appeal then you should see the Year 12 Level Leader.

Assessment

There are two forms of school assessment, school assessed coursework (SAC) and school assessed tasks (SAT). The form or forms of school assessment and their weighting is specified for each study.

ATAR

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).  The overall ranking on a scale of zero to 99.95 that a student receives based on his/her study scores. The ATAR is calculated by VTAC and used by universities and TAFE institutes to select students for courses. 

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all classes.  Students should bring a note/medical certificate from home for any absence. Students absent on days of School Assessed coursework must supply a correctly dated medical certificate.

Authentication

Teachers and students have to state that the work submitted is the student's work and that no copying or cheating has occurred.  The easiest way to safeguard this area is for students to be at school, working in classes. In this way teachers can see the work in progress and know that the final product has been completed by the student.

Breach of Rules

The VCAA has a very dim view of students who break the rules that are given to each student when they enrol.  A variety of penalties are applied, depending upon the situation.

Candidate Numbers

Each student is allocated a Candidate Number.  This is very important, as it is the only form of identification written on SAT’s and exams.  Students should write it down in several places, including their diary and folders.

Change of Name and/or Address

It is very important that the school and the VCAA know about any changes. Please inform the General Office and Year Level Leader immediately if any changes are to be made.

Deadlines

Students are expected to meet the deadlines for assignments. Issues affecting deadlines should be discussed with teachers.

Delay of Decision on Satisfactory Completion of a Unit

A long statement that basically says that sometimes work can be completed beyond the end of semester 1, under certain special circumstances.  Hopefully this won't be necessary, but if necessary see either the Year 11 or Year 12 Year Level Leader.

Derived Examination Score

This provision is for students who are prevented from attending a Unit 3/4 examination, or whose performance on an exam is adversely affected as a result of illness, accident or some traumatic event occurring immediately before or during the exam. See the Year 12 Level Leader for details

GAT

The General Achievement Test is used to provide a consistent basis to compare students’ results on their School Assessed SAC’s.  They are a method to hopefully ensure the SAC and SAT grades are a reflection of the student’s abilities.

Grades

SAC, SAT’s and exams are graded from A+ to E, depending on your level of performance on the task. Other grades that may be used are UG and NA.  UG-means ungraded - your level was not up to the E standard; and NA means the work was not assessed - usually due to non-completion or non-submission.

Learning Outcome

Skills and knowledge student will achieve in the completion of a unit of study.

Lost or  Damaged Work

Hopefully this won't occur. There are rules governing this situation, but the best thing to do is be in constant contact with the teacher about your progress.  Students should keep all rough notes and drafts of essays, projects, etc. and ensure all work is named.

Reports

End of Semester reports will be issued indicating whether the student has satisfied the requirements of the unit (S/N), comments about their work and grades for all Assessment Tasks.  Comments can be found on Compass under Learning Tasks.  At the end of the year students will receive a statement of results from the VCAA, which states whether the student has successfully completed each unit that she has attempted.

Results

The VCAA results are released in December.

SAC

· Is made up of a number of assessment tasks that are specified by the study design.

· Is used to assess the unit learning outcomes.

· Is part of the regular teaching and learning program.

· Is completed mainly in class time in a limited time frame.

SAT

A small number of studies will have school-assessed tasks (SATs). They are used in studies where products and models are to be assessed: Art, Media, Studio Arts, Food and Technology, Product Design and Technology and Visual Communication and Design.

Results of these school assessments will count towards your study score in each VCE study and ultimately towards your Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).

Special Provision

The VCAA realises that sometimes things get in your way when studying - this includes physical or mental disabilities, illness, personal problems or other impairments.  The best thing to do is immediately inform your Year Level Leader of the problem and discuss it with them. There are official forms and procedures to go through.

VCAA

The VCAA is responsible for the administration and development of the VCE, as well as curriculum development for Primary and Year 7-10 students. 

VCE

The Victorian Certificate of Education

VET

Vocational Education and Training Programs

VTAC

The Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre. VTAC looks after most enrolments into Victorian tertiary institutes, except when special entry applies (e.g. mature age, etc.), including Universities and TAFE Colleges.  Students should check through the "Entry Requirements Booklet", available in the careers room, to ensure their VCE course satisfies the requirements for entry into their prospective Tertiary course.

Key Dates

  • A curriculum information evening will be held for families in July prior to the subject selection process commencing.
  • A Headstart Program will be conducted for Year 10 and 11 at the end of November/early December in each year. Students are expected to attend the Headstart Program designed for their year level.
  • Students will confirm subjects in late November/early December and pay subject and services fees for the following year.  Payment plans are available.
  • Families can confirm dates on the MGC Calendar, Website and Compass.

VCE English Studies

English

This study aims to develop competence in the understanding and use of English for a variety of purposes sufficient to meet the demands of post-school employment, further education, and participation in a democratic society. It emphasises the integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking.  It values student diversity and particularly encourages learning in which students take responsibility for their language development and thus grow in confidence and in language skill and understanding.

EN1: English 1

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding to an expanded range of text types and genres in order to analyse ways in which they are constructed and interpreted, and on the development of competence and confidence in creating written, oral or multimodal texts.

EN2: English 2

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding to an expanded range of text types and genres in order to analyse ways in which they are constructed and interpreted, and on the development of competence and confidence in creating written, oral or multimodal texts.

 

Note: There is a fee associated with this subject of $20.00 .**

 

EN3: English 3

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding both orally and in writing to a range of texts. Students analyse how the authors of texts create meaning and the different ways in which texts can be interpreted. They develop competence in creating written texts by responding analytically and creatively to ideas suggested by their reading. They also develop the ability to explain choices they have made as authors.

EN4: English 4

The focus of this unit is the comparison of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They explore the meaningful connections between two texts, include the interplay between character and setting, voice and structure, and how ideas, issues and themes are conveyed. Students also develop a persuasive oral presentation in relation to a topical issue that has appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year.

Note: There is a fee associated with this subject of $20.00 .**

English as an Additional Language

This study aims to develop competence in the understanding and use of English for a variety of purposes sufficient to meet the demands of post-school employment, further education, and participation in a democratic society. It emphasises the integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening and thinking. It values student diversity and particularly encourages learning in which students take responsibility for their language development and thus grow in confidence and in language skill and understanding.

EAL1: English  (EAL) 1

The focus of this unit is the reading of texts with comprehension and discrimination, and the development of competence and confidence in writing. There is also a focus on the use of and response to oral language in different contexts and for different purposes, and listening for understanding and meaning.

EAL2: English  (EAL) 2

The focus of this unit is on comparing different texts and developing writing skills to respond to texts in a critical and analytical manner. There is also a focus on oral and aural language in formal and informal contexts, and critical thinking and understanding in developing responses to issues, both written and oral.

EAL3: English  (EAL) 3

The focus of this unit is the development of written critical and analytical responses to texts, including media texts. Listening skills and oral competency, both in informal and formal contexts, is also an area of focus in this unit.

EAL4: English  (EAL) 4

The focus of this unit is in the continuing development of competency in writing skills for different audiences and purposes, evidenced in critical and analytical responses to texts. Oral and listening skills are also an integral part of this unit.

English Language

VCE English Language explores the ways in which language is used by individuals and groups and reflects our thinking and values.  Learning about language helps us to understand ourselves, the groups with which we identify, and the society we inhabit.  English Language builds on students’ previous learning about the conventions and codes used by speakers and writers of English.  Informed by the discipline of linguistics, it provides students with metalinguistic tools to understand and analyse language use, variation and change.

EL1: Language & Communication

In this unit, students consider the way language is organised so that its users have the means to make sense of their experiences and to interact with others. Students explore the various functions of language and the nature of language as a highly elaborate system of signs.  The relationship between speech and writing as the dominant modes of language and the impact of situational and cultural contexts on language choices are also considered. Students investigate children’s ability to acquire language, and the stages of language acquisition across a range of subsystems.

EL2: English  Language

In this unit, students focus on language change and people’s attitudes towards it. Languages are dynamic and change is an inevitable and a continuous process. Students consider factors contributing to change over time in the English language and factors contributing to the spread of English, such as globalisation. They explore texts from the past, and contemporary texts, considering how all subsystems of the language system are affected. 

EL3: Language Variation & Social Purpose

In this unit students investigate English Language in the Australian social setting, along a continuum of informal and formal registers.  They consider language as a means of societal interaction understanding that through written and spoken texts we communicate information, ideas, attitudes, prejudices and ideological stances.

EL4: Language Variation & Identity

In this unit students focus on the role of language in establishing and challenging different identities.  Many varieties of English exist in contemporary Australian society, including national, regional, cultural and social variations.  Students examine both print and digital texts to consider the ways different identities are constructed.

Literature 

The study of literature focuses on the enjoyment and appreciation of reading that arises from discussion, debate and the challenge of exploring the meanings of literary texts. Students reflect on their interpretations and those of others. The study of literature encourages independent and critical thinking in students’ analytical and creative responses to texts, which will assist students in the workforce and in future academic study.

LI1: Literature 1

This unit focuses on the ways literary texts represent human experience and the reading practices students develop to deepen their understanding of a text. Students respond to a range of texts personally, critically and creatively.

LI2: Literature 2

The focus of this unit is on students’ critical and creative responses to texts. Students deepen their understanding of their responses to aspects of texts such as the style of narrative, the characters, the language and structure of the text. They understand the ways their own culture and the cultures represented in the text can influence their interpretations and shape different meanings.

LI3: Literature 3

This unit focuses on how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. Students investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. Students also explore the ways writers construct their work within given social and historical contexts and develop creative responses to texts.

LI4: Literature 4

This unit focuses on students’ developing critical and analytic responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts, the style of the language and points of view. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.

7th Period English Studies at VCE

Please note that VCE English, EAL, Literature and English Language all have seven timetabled sessions per cycle.

 

If a student chooses to study two of English, Literature and English Language, they must be aware that the seventh period for these two subjects is scheduled at the same time.

 

Students are expected to attend alternating sessions of these subjects, ensuring that they regularly communicate and liaise with their teachers to ensure that they up to date with the learning program and learning outcomes within each subject.

VCE Mathematics

VCE Mathematics consists of six blocks. Three blocks at Unit 1 and 2 level and three blocks at Unit 3 and 4 level. Each unit takes one semester to complete and these blocks would normally be taken as a two-unit sequence.

 

Students need to talk to their mathematics teacher and the careers adviser before making their choice. Students must select their maths subject (s) as a year long subject as there is no guarantee that a change of maths subject will be possible during semester 1 or prior to semester 2. For example, students who enrol in Maths Methods Unit 1 will be unable to change to General Maths.

Year 11

GENERAL MATHEMATICS UNITS 1/2

This course is for those students who only wish to study Further Mathematics in Year 12 and is usually not taken with any other unit of mathematics in Year 11.

 

MATHEMATICAL METHODS UNITS 1/2

Students selecting this subject may be doing Specialist Mathematics concurrently. Work covered will provide preparation for Mathematical Methods Units 3/4 and Specialist Mathematics Units 3 /4. It is also ideal preparation for any student wishing to take Further Mathematics and Units 3/4 in Year 12.

 

SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS UNITS 1/2

This course is for those students who wish to study both Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics in Year 12 or just Mathematical Methods in Year 12. It must be taken in combination with Mathematical Methods Units 1/ 2.

 

Computer Algebra System CALCULATORS

Students undertaking any V.C.E. Mathematics unit must be able to use the CAS calculator to support wider enquiry into the concepts, skills and tasks covered within that unit.

 

OPTIONS IN YEAR 11

Students will need to determine the amount of Mathematics they require to keep their options open for tertiary courses. They must also realistically consider their ability to successfully manage the Courses they select.

Year 12

FURTHER MATHEMATICS UNITS 3/4

This course is intended for students who would like to continue a study of Mathematics but do not require a specific Mathematics prerequisite for further studies.

 

MATHEMATICAL METHODS UNITS 3/4

This course is intended for students who would like to continue a study of Mathematics that is algebraic and/or who require this subject for further tertiary study. This subject is a prerequisite for a number of courses.

 

SPECIALISTS MATHEMATICS UNITS 3/4

This course is intended for students who will be studying Mathematics at University, or who will be applying for a course where this subject is a prerequisite. It must be taken in combination with Mathematical Methods Units 3/ 4.

 

Computer Algebra System CALCULATORS

Students undertaking any V.C.E. Mathematics unit must be able to use the CAS calculator to support wider enquiry into the concepts, skills and tasks covered within that unit.

 

OPTIONS IN YEAR 12

Students will need to determine the amount of Mathematics they require to keep their options open for tertiary courses. They must also realistically consider their ability to successfully manage the Courses they select. Doing all three Mathematics subjects  in Year 12 is not recommended. All three Mathematics can not be included in the primary four subjects of your ATAR.

Some Possible Courses

Course 1: Mathematical Method 1-4,Specialist Mathematics 1-4:

This course is appropriate for students who intend to undertake Science or Mathematics based tertiary courses. To choose this course you should like Mathematics and have done very well at it.

Course 2: Mathematical Methods 1-4, Specialist Mathematics 1/2:

You will choose this course if you want to keep your options open for most University courses. You need to have achieved reasonable marks in Mathematics Semesters 1 & 2 in Year 10.

Course 3: General Mathematics 1/2, Further Mathematics 3/4:

You will do this course if you don’t want to do a tertiary course that is Mathematics based or if you haven’t found Mathematics easy but want to continue your studies.

Course 4: Mathematical Methods 1/2, Further Mathematics 3/4:

You will do this course if you don’t want to do a tertiary course that is Mathematics based but want to keep your options open in Year 11. You need to have achieved reasonable marks in Mathematics Semesters 1 & 2 in Year 10.

General Mathematics

GM1: GENERAL MATHEMATICS 1

In Unit 1 topics studied will include Applications of arithmetic, Financial arithmetic, Linear graphs, Data distributions, Matrices and Algebra. The appropriate use of technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer packages. The focus on the course is on practical applications of Mathematics.

GM2: GENERAL MATHEMATICS 2

In Unit 2 topics studied will include Bivariate Statistics, Number patterns and recursions, Networks, Shape, Measurement and Trigonometry. The appropriate use of technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer packages. The focus on the course is on practical applications of Mathematics.

Further Mathematics

FM3: FURTHER MATHEMATICS 3

Further Mathematics consists of two areas of study, Data Analysis, and Recursion and Financial Modelling a selection of three from six modules. In Data Analysis, students review their skills from previous studies in data gathering, describe and analyse data with one variable, examine bivariate data to show the relationship between two variables, and study time series, where we investigate one measurement over a length of time. In Recursion and Financial Modelling, students develop their skills in dealing with arithmetic and geometric sequences, first order linear difference equations, Fibonacci and related sequences in the context of financial modelling. They solve related equations numerically, graphically and use their CAS calculator and/or algebraic skills.

FM4: FURTHER MATHEMATICS 4

In Unit 4 students complete two application modules. In Geometry and Measurement, student review Geometry, including angles, triangles, Pythagoras theorem and similar figures. They solve problems involving trigonometric ratios with right-angled and non-right-angled triangles, and explore practical applications including bearings, contour maps and angles of elevation, and also solve measurement problems involving length, area and volume. In the second module, Matrices, students expand on their knowledge of operations involving  matrices, and discover applications of matrices to different situations, including solving simultaneous equations and transition problems. In this module and throughout the course students apply technology (CAS calculator) to carry out calculations where applicable. Students will then revise the year in preparation for their two end-of-year examinations.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $25.00. per year**

Mathematical Methods

MM1: MATHEMATICAL METHODS 1

The areas of study in Unit 1 are Functions and Graphs, Algebra, Calculus and Probability. The appropriate use of a computer algebra system and other technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer
packages.

MM2: MATHEMATICAL METHODS 2

The areas of study in Unit 2 are Functions and graphs, Circular functions, Exponential Functions, Algebra, Calculus and Probability. The appropriate use of a computer algebra system and other technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer packages.

Note: To undertake Unit 2 Maths Methods, it is highly recommended that students have satisfactorily completed Unit 1 Methods with at least a “C” average.

MM3: MATHEMATICAL METHODS 3

Mathematical Methods Unit 3 involves the study of material from the following areas of study: Polynomial Functions; Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Circular (trigonometric) Functions and calculus. Students practise mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques and use them to  solve standard problems; apply mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations which require investigative, modelling or problem-solving approaches, and use technology appropriately and effectively to learn mathematics and apply it in different contexts.

Note: To undertake Methods Unit 3 and 4 students must have satisfactorily completed Unit 1 and 2 Maths Methods with at least a C average.

MM4: MATHEMATICAL METHODS 4

Mathematical Methods Unit 4 involves the study of material from the following areas of study: Calculus and Statistics Probability. Students practise mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques and use them to  solve standard problems; apply mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations which require investigative, modelling or problem-solving approaches, and use technology appropriately and effectively to learn mathematics and apply it in different contexts.

Note: There is a fee associated with this Mathematical Methods 3/4 of $40.00 per year.**

Specialist Mathematics

Entry: There are no prerequisites for entry to Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2 however it is

expected that students will study Mathematical Methods concurrently.

SM1: SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS 1

This course is designed to complement studies in Mathematical Methods, which would normally be taken concurrently, and prepare students for Specialist Mathematics (3-4). The topics covered include Number Systems, Linear Graphs and Modelling, Linear programming, Shape and Measurement, and Trigonometry. The appropriate use of technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer packages.

SM2: SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS 2

This course is designed to complement studies in Mathematical Methods, which would normally be taken concurrently, and prepare students for Specialist Mathematics (3-4).  The topics covered include Variation, Sketching and interpreting graphs, Vectors, Sequences and series and Induction and statistics and probability. The appropriate use of technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. This includes the use of CAS calculators, spreadsheets, and appropriate computer packages.

SM3: SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS 3

In Unit 3, includes content from Coordinate Geometry, Circular functions, Algebra, Calculus and Vectors in and 3D areas of study. The course highlights mathematical structure and proof. The appropriate use of technology to support the learning of Mathematics is incorporated throughout the course. Specialist Mathematics would normally be taken concurrently with Mathematical Methods 3 and 4, which contains assumed knowledge for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4. 

Note: Enrolment in Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 assumes satisfactory completion of BOTH Specialist Mathematics and Maths Methods with at least a ‘C’ average.

SM4: SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS 4

In Unit 4, students study content from the Algebra, Calculus and Vectors, Kinematics, Mechanics and Statistics. The course highlights mathematical structure and proof.

Note: There is a fee associated with this Specialist Mathematics 3/4 of $40.00 per year.**

7th Period Mathematics at VCE

Please note that Unit 1/2 Mathematical Methods, Unit 3/4 Further Maths and Unit 3/4 Mathematical Methods all have seven timetabled sessions per cycle.

 

If a student chooses to study both Unit 3/4 Math Methods and Unit 3/4 Further Math they must be aware that the seventh period for these two subjects is scheduled at the same time. These students will attend the period 7 class for Mathematical Methods unless there is an assessment planned for Further Maths.

 

Students are expected to ensure that they regularly communicate and liaise with their teachers to ensure that they up to date with the learning program and learning outcomes within each subject.

VCE Arts

Dance

Dance is the language of movement. This study is designed to develop a broad understanding and appreciation of dance through the integration of practical and theoretical aspects of learning in the context of composition and performance. It also allows students to develop and refine their technical and compositional skills by exploring a personal and learnt movement vocabulary and ways in which ideas are communicated in their own and others’ dance.  Students wishing to complete Units 1/2 Dance in Year 10 must successfully audition for the VCE Dance teacher at the latest one week prior to the close of subject selection. 

 

DA1: DANCE 1

This unit enables students to explore the potential of the body as an instrument of expression. Students learn to apply knowledge of the safe use and care of the body in the development of their physical skills and body actions.

 

DA2: DANCE 2

This unit allows students to expand their dance vocabulary by exploring different ways of executing movement to produce contrasting qualities. Students apply their understanding of the expressive capacity of different movement qualities to the learning, composition and performance of dance works.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $150.00 per year.**

 

DA3: DANCE 3

In units 3 and 4, students develop and refine compositional skills by exploring ways in which the intention of the dance maker can be expressed through the arrangement of movement within a structure, and using spatial organisation and group structures.

 

DA4: DANCE 4

This unit focuses on choreography, rehearsal and performance of a unified solo dance work which has a beginning, development/s and resolution. When rehearsing and performing this work students focus on expressive and accurate execution of choreographic variations of spatial organisation and demonstration of performance skills. Students also document and analyse the dance-making and performance processes involved in the choreography, rehearsal and performance of the unified solo dance work.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $150.00 per year.**

 

Levels of achievement - Units 3 and 4

School Assessed work and two end of year examinations:

· Unit 3 school assessed coursework: 25 per cent

· Units 3 and 4 composition and performance examination: 50 per cent

· Units 3 and 4  Written Examination: 25 per cent

 

Drama

Drama provides students with the opportunity to examine and explore the ways in which drama gives form to, and makes meaning of, a range of social, political, cultural and historical contexts. It focuses on the development of expressive skills within dramatic structures and the development and performance of imagined characters, achieved through the refinement of skills, techniques and processes in the creation and presentation of dramatic works.

 

DR1: INTRODUCING PERFORMANCE STYLES

In this unit students study performance styles from a range of social, historical and cultural contexts. They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances. This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised ensemble performance that includes real or imagined characters. They document the processes they use as they explore a range of stimulus material, and experiment with production areas, dramatic elements, conventions and performance styles. This unit also involves analysis of a student’s own performance work and a work by professional drama performers.

 

DR2: AUSTRALIAN IDENTITY

In this unit students study the work of selected drama practitioners and associated performance styles. This also involves exploring aspects of Australian identity evident in contemporary drama practice. This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised mini-solo and ensemble performance. Students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context.

Note: There is a fee of $120.00 associated with Drama 1/2.**

 

DR3: DEVISED ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE

In this unit students explore the work of drama practitioners and draw on contemporary practice as they devise ensemble performance work. They work collaboratively to devise, develop and present an ensemble performance. Students create work that reflects a specific performance style or one that draws on multiple performance styles and is therefore eclectic in nature. Throughout development of the work they experiment with transformation of character, time and place, and application of symbol. Students devise and shape their work to communicate meaning or to have a specific impact on their audience. Students analyse and evaluate a professional drama performance selected from the prescribed VCE Drama Unit 3 Playlist published annually on the VCAA website.

 

DR4: DEVISED SOLO PERFORMANCE

This unit focuses on the development and the presentation of devised solo performances. Students develop skills in extracting dramatic potential from stimulus material and use play-making techniques to develop and present a short solo performance. They experiment with application of symbol and transformation of character, time and place. They apply conventions, dramatic elements, expressive skills, performance skills and performance styles to shape and give meaning to their work. Students further develop and refine these skills as they create a performance in response to a prescribed structure. They consider the use of production areas to enhance their performance and the application of symbol and transformations.

Note: There is a fee of $160.00 associated with Drama 3/4.**

Media

The media is ubiquitous in today’s world. Working on a personal, local, national and global level, media is deeply embedded within life and culture. It entertains, teaches, informs, and shapes audiences’ perception of their lives and the worlds in which they live. Stories in all their forms are at the heart of the media and its relationship with audiences. Through stories narratives are constructed that engage, and are read, by audiences. Representations of ideas, realities and imagination are constructed and deconstructed, remixed and reimagined with ever increasing technological sophistication, ease and speed to engage audiences.

 

ME1: MEDIA FORMS, REPRESENTATIONS AND AUSTRALIAN STORIES

Outcome 1 Media Representations: The media plays an important role in shaping society and the values and beliefs of the audience. In this unit we look at representations of gender and race in the media.

Outcome 2 Media Forms in Production: Students use the media production process to design, produce and evaluate media representations for specified audiences in a range of media forms.

Outcome 3 Australian Stories: Stories have always been a pivotal part of culture. Australian media is built on fictional and non-fictional stories that reflect our local, national and global cultural histories. Students analyse how the features of Australian fictional and non-fictional narratives in two or more media forms.

 

ME2: NARRATIVE ACROSS MEDIA FORMS

Outcome 1 Narrative, Style  and Genre: In this area of study students explore and examine how narratives construct realities and meaning for audiences. Students analyse the intentions of media creators and producers and the influences of narratives on the audience in different media forms.

Outcome 2 Narratives in Production: Narratives are created through a production process that involves the conceptualisation and development of ideas, pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. Students create, develop and construct narratives.

Outcome 3 Media and Change: Developments in media technologies have dramatically altered the media landscape and the relationship between the media and its audiences. Students discuss the influence of new media technologies on society, audiences, the individual, media industries and institutions.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $110.00 per year.**

 

ME3: MEDIA NARRATIVES AND PRE-PRODUCTION

Outcome 1 Narrative and Ideology: Students examine fictional and non-fictional narratives in the form of film and/or television and/or radio and/or audio product (and/or photographic and/or print products.

Students analyse how narratives are constructed and distributed.

Outcome 2 Media Production Development: Students conduct an investigation of aspects of the media form in which they will work, developing knowledge of narrative, genre, style, media codes and conventions and aspects of the works of media practitioners relevant to their proposed production. Students research a media form and experiment with media technologies and media production processes to inform and document the design of a media production.

Outcome 3  Media Production Design: Media production designs are a set of written and visual documents that detail the stages of production of a proposed product. The production design communicates both creative vision and thorough planning. Students develop and document a media production design in a selected media form for a specified audience.

 

ME4: MEDIA PRODUCTION AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA

Outcome 1  Media Production: The production, post-production and distribution stages of a media product are a natural progression from the pre-production stage of the media production process. Students produce, the media product designed in Unit 3.

 The relationship between the media and audiences has never been more complex. The contemporary media landscape poses issues and challenges for the way that academics and commentators have traditionally theorized the nature of communication. Students discuss issues of agency and control in the relationship between the media and its audience.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $110.00 per year.**

 

 

Music Performance

Music offers students opportunities to engage in the practice of performing, creating and studying music that is representative of diverse genres, styles and cultures. Students develop knowledge of stylistic, aesthetic and expressive qualities and characteristics of music and their ability to communicate their understanding through music making; performing, composing, arranging and/or improvising. Students develop their music language skills in aural perception, analysis and theory.

 

MP1: MUSIC PERFORMANCE 1

This unit focuses on building performance and music language skills. Students present performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments. They study the work of other performers and explore strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and must practise technical work to address these challenges. Students study aural, theory and analysis of music concepts.

 

MP2: MUSIC PERFORMANCE 2

This unit further develops skills in practical music and performance in solo and group contexts, using one or more instruments. Students develop their musicianship skills of aural, theory and analysis. Students also create an original composition or improvisation.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $20.00 per year.**

 

MP3: MUSIC PERFORMANCE 3 - SOLO

The focus of this unit is preparing a solo program for their end of year external exam from the prescribed list of works on their instrument of choice. Technical, creative and interpretation skills are developed for their performance of music in a range of styles. They continue to develop their aural and theory skills. The focus for analysis of music is works and performances by Australian musicians and comparative listenings. Students also complete some group performances.

 

MP4: MUSIC PERFORMANCE 4 - SOLO

The focus of this unit is on the continuing preparation and presentation of their solo performance program. Continued refinement of instrumental and performance techniques is a class focus. Students continue to develop their aural and theoretical knowledge and analysis skills in preparation for their external written exam.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $20.00 per year.**

ENTRY

Ideally, to undertake Units 3 and 4 Solo Performance, students should have about three years experience prior to Year 11 on a musical instrument or voice, and it is recommended that students complete Units 1/2  before Units 3/4.

 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE: GROUP UNITS 3&4

Students can chose Music Performance and be assessed as a member of a group ensemble. The outcomes for Solo and Group are the same, with the external performance exam still being worth 50% of their overall mark. Students can have non-assessed members in their group. NB: Students must have their group membership confirmed and an agreement signed before beginning Music Performance Group Units 3/4.

Students must complete two contrasting works out of their four songs from the prescribed list for group on the VCAA website. http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/music/musicindex.aspx

 

Performance Exam Duration:

1 assessed performer = 25 minute recital

2 or 3 assessed performers = 30 minute recital

4 assessed performers = 35 minute recital

5 or 6 assessed performers = 40 minute recital.

Examples of possible group ensembles:

Rock Band, vocal, jazz, strings, woodwind, brass, percussion or any combination of instruments.

Studio Arts

Studio Arts provides a framework for the establishment of effective art practices through an understanding and application of a studio process. This course provides fine art studies in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, digital photography and sculpture. Students generate, explore and communicate ideas through specific studio forms and develop and use specialized skills in a range of media and techniques. The theoretical component of the study informs students’ practice through an investigation of how artists have developed their practice and have used materials, techniques and processes to create aesthetic qualities in their work. Students also study art industry contexts, specifically the role of artists in society and the presentation and exhibition of artworks in art galleries and exhibition spaces.

 

SA1: STUDIO INSPIRATION AND TECHNIQUES

In this unit students focus on developing an individual understanding of the stages of studio practice and learn how to explore, develop, refine, resolve and present artworks. Students explore sources of inspiration, research artistic influences develop individual ideas and explore a range of materials and techniques related to specific art forms.

 

SA2: STUDIO EXPLORATION AND CONCEPTS

In this unit students focus on establishing and using a studio practice to produce artworks. The studio practice includes the formulation and use of an individual approach to documenting sources of inspiration, and experimentation with selected materials and techniques relevant to specific art forms.

Note: There is a fee associated with Studio Arts 1/2 of $160.00 per year.**

 

SA3: STUDIO PRACTICES AND PROCESSES

In this unit students focus on the implementation of an individual studio process leading to the production of a range of potential directions. Students develop and use an exploration proposal to define an area of creative exploration. They plan and apply a studio process to explore and develop their individual ideas.

 

SA4: STUDIO PRACTICE AND ART INDUSTRY CONCEPTS

In this unit students focus on the planning, production and evaluation required to develop, refine and present artworks that link cohesively according to the ideas resolved in Unit 3. This unit also investigates aspects of artists’ involvement in the art industry, focusing on a least two different exhibitions, that the student has visited in the current year of study with reference to specific artworks in those exhibitions.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course with Studio Arts 3/4 of $160.00 per year.**

 

Visual Communication Design

Visual Communication Design is intended to assist students in the understanding, use and interpretation of a range of visual communications. It involves a study of the vocabulary and grammar of visual communication, which includes an understanding of, and application of, drawing and drawing conventions, design elements, and principles and function of design in communication. This study also provides the opportunity to develop an informed, critical and discriminating approach to visual communications encountered in everyday life.

 

VCD1: DRAWING AS A MEANS OF COMMUNICATION

This area of study introduces the knowledge and skills that underpins some of the stages in the design process of generating ideas, developing concepts and refinement of visual communications. It focuses on the development of visual language and design thinking. Students use observational, visualisation and presentation drawing as the means by which ideas and concepts are communicated.

 

VCD2: APPLICATIONS OF VISUAL COMMUNICATION WITHIN DESIGN FIELDS

This unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design thinking and drawing methods to create visual communications to meet specific purposes in designated design fields.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $130.00 per year.**

 

VCD3: VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN PRACTICES

In this unit students gain an understanding of the process designers employ to structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists.

 

VCD4: VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN DEVELOPMENT, EVALUATION AND PRESENTATION

The focus of this unit is on the development of design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated communication needs.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $130.00 per year.**

 

VCE Science

Biology

Biology is a diverse and evolving science discipline that seeks to understand and explore the nature of life, past and present. Despite the diversity of organisms and their many adaptations for survival in various environments, all life forms share a degree of relatedness and a common origin. The study explores the dynamic relationships between organisms and their interactions with the non-living environment. It also explores the processes of life, from the molecular world of the cell to that of the whole organism, that maintain life and ensure its continuity.

 

BI1: BIOLOGY 1 - HOW DO LIVING THINGS STAY ALIVE?

In this unit students are introduced to some of the challenges of sustaining life. Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life. They analyse types of  adaptations that enhance the organism’s survival in a particular habitat and the role homeostatic mechanisms play in this. The role of a keystone species in maintaining the structure of an ecosystem is explored. Students look at how the planet’s biodiversity is classified and the factors that affect the growth of a population.

 

BI2: BIOLOGY 2 - HOW IS CONTINUITY OF LIFE MAINTAINED?

In this unit students will focus on cell reproduction and the transmission of biological information from generation to generation. They examine the process of DNA replication and compare cell division in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Students explore the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproductive strategies, and consider the advantages and disadvantages of these two types of reproduction. Students use chromosome theory and terminology from classical genetics to explain the inheritance of characteristics, analyse patterns of inheritance, interpret pedigree charts and predict outcomes of genetic crosses. They explore the relationship between genes, the environment and the regulation of genes in giving rise to phenotypes.

 

BI3: BIOLOGY 3 - HOW DO CELLS MAINTAIN LIFE?

In this unit students investigate the workings of the cell from several perspectives. They explore the importance of the insolubility of the plasma membrane in water and its differential permeability to specific solutes in defining the cell, its internal spaces and the control of the movement of molecules and ions in and out of such spaces. Students consider base pairing specificity, the binding of enzymes and substrates, the response of receptors to signalling molecules and reactions between antigens and antibodies to highlight the importance of molecular interactions based on the complementary nature of specific molecules. Students study the synthesis, structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins as key molecules in cellular processes. They explore the chemistry of cells by examining the nature of biochemical pathways, their components and energy transformations. Cells communicate with each other using a variety of signalling molecules. Students consider the types of signals, the transduction of information within the cell and cellular responses. At this molecular level students study the human immune system and the interactions between its components to provide immunity to a specific antigen.

 

BI4: BIOLOGY 4 - HOW DOES LIFE CHANGE & RESPOND TO CHALLENGES OVERTIME?

In this unit students consider the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. They investigate the relatedness between species and the impact of various change events on a population’s gene pool. The accumulation of changes over time is considered as a mechanism for biological evolution by natural selection that leads to the rise of new species. Students examine change in life forms using evidence from palaeontology, biogeography, developmental biology and structural morphology. They explore how technological developments in the fields of comparative genomics, molecular homology and bioinformatics have resulted in evidence of change through measurements of relatedness between species. Students examine the structural and cognitive trends in the human fossil record and the interrelationships between human biological and cultural evolution. The biological consequences, and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule and applying biotechnologies is explored for both the individual and the species.

To undertake units 3 and 4 it is highly recommended that students have successfully completed Unit 1 and 2 Biology with at least a C average.

Note: There is a fee associated with Biology Units 3/4  of $35.00 per year.**

Chemistry

Chemistry explores and explains the composition and behaviour of matter and the chemical processes that occur on Earth and beyond. Chemical models and theories are used to describe and explain known chemical reactions and processes. Chemistry underpins the production and development of energy, the maintenance of clean air and water, the production of food, medicines and new materials, and the treatment of wastes.

 

CHEMISTRY UNITS 1&2

Chemistry Units 1 & 2 attempts to explain the diversity and properties of materials in the world by examining the structure and bonding in both metals and non-metals. Bonding models and a study of the Periodic Table will help explain the properties of various materials. Students will be introduced to quantitative concepts in Chemistry including the mole concept and stoichiometry. The structure of water will be investigated to attempt to outline its unique properties and explain its interactions with other substances. An introduction to analytical techniques and instrumental procedures will be used to determine concentrations of different species in water samples, including chemical contaminants. Throughout both units students will use Chemistry terminology including symbols, formulas, chemical nomenclature and equations to represent and explain observations and data from experiments, and to discuss chemical phenomena. Practical investigations will be undertaken in both units to reinforce the key ideas and to develop confidence with experimental techniques.

Unit 1 and 2 Chemistry is a combination of theory and practical classes.  It is a prerequisite for Unit 3 and 4 Chemistry.

 

CH3: HOW CAN CHEMICAL PROCESSES BE DESIGNED TO OPTIMISE EFFICIENCY?

Students compare and evaluate different chemical energy resources, including fossil fuels, biofuels, galvanic cells and fuel cells. They investigate the combustion of fuels, including the energy transformations involved, the use of stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products involved in the reactions, and calculations of the amounts of energy released and their representations. Students consider the purpose, design and operating principles of galvanic cells, fuel cells and electrolytic cells. In this context they use the electrochemical series to predict and write half and overall redox equations, and apply Faraday’s laws to calculate quantities in electrolytic reactions. Students analyse manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their reaction rates and extent. They investigate and apply the equilibrium law and Le Chatelier’s principle to different reaction systems, including to predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical processes.

 

CH4: HOW ARE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS CATEGORISED, ANALYSED AND USED?

In this unit students study the ways in which organic structures are represented and named. They process data from instrumental analyses of organic compounds to confirm or deduce organic structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic chemicals in mixtures. Students consider the nature of the reactions involved to predict the products of reaction pathways and to design pathways to produce particular compounds from given starting materials. Students investigate key food molecules through an exploration of their chemical structures, the hydrolytic reactions in which they are broken down and the condensation reactions in which they are rebuilt to form new molecules. In this context the role of enzymes and coenzymes in facilitating chemical reactions is explored. Students use calorimetry as an investigative tool to determine the energy released in the combustion of foods.

To undertake units 3 and 4 students must have successfully completed Chemistry Units 1 and 2 with at least a C average.

Note: There is a fee associated with Chemistry Units 3/4  of $35.00 per year.**

 

 

Physics

Physics seeks to understand and explain the physical world. It examines models and ideas used to make sense of the world and which are sometimes challenged as new knowledge develops. By looking at the way matter and energy interact through observations, measurements and experiments, physicists gain a better understanding of the underlying laws of nature.

 

PH1: PHYSICS 1 - WHAT IDEAS EXPLAIN THE PHYSICAL WORLD?

In this unit students explore how physics explains phenomena, at various scales, which are not always visible to the unaided human eye. They examine some of the fundamental ideas and models used by physicists in an attempt to understand and explain the world. Students consider thermal concepts by investigating heat, and consider the origins and formation of matter.  Students use thermodynamic principles to explain phenomena related to changes in thermal energy. They apply thermal laws when investigating energy transfers within and between systems, and assess the impact of human use of energy on the environment. They explore current scientifically accepted theories that explain how matter and energy have changed since the origins of the Universe. Students examine the motion of electrons and explain how it can be manipulated and utilised.

 

PH2: PHYSICS 2 - WHAT DO EXPERIMENTS REVEAL ABOUT THE REAL WORLD?

In this unit students explore the power of experiments in developing models and theories. They investigate a variety of phenomena by making their own observations and generating questions, which in turn lead to experiments. Students make direct observations of physics phenomena and examine the ways in which phenomena that may not be directly observable can be explored through indirect observations. In the core component of this unit students investigate the ways in which forces are involved both in moving objects and in keeping objects stationary. Students choose one of twelve options related to astrobiology, astrophysics, bioelectricity, biomechanics, electronics, flight, medical physics, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, optics, sound and sports science. The option enables students to pursue an area of interest by investigating a selected question.

 

PH3: PHYSICS 3 - HOW DO FIELDS EXPLAIN MOTION & ELECTRICITY

In this unit students explore the importance of energy in explaining and describing the physical world. They examine the production of electricity and its delivery to homes. Students consider the field model as a construct that has enabled an understanding of why objects move when they are not apparently in contact with other objects. Applications of concepts related to fields include the transmission of electricity over large distances and the design and operation of particle accelerators. They explore the interactions, effects and applications of gravitational, electric and magnetic fields. Students use Newton’s laws to investigate motion in one and two dimensions, and are introduced to Einstein’s theories to explain the motion of very fast objects.

 

PH4: PHYSICS 4 - HOW CAN TWO CONTRADICTORY MODELS EXPLAIN BOTH LIGHT & MATTER?

In this unit, students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. They examine how the concept of the wave is used to explain the nature of light and explore its limitations in describing light behaviour. Students further investigate light by using a particle model to explain its behaviour. A wave model is also used to explain the behaviour of matter which enables students to consider the relationship between light and matter. Students learn to think beyond the concepts experienced in everyday life to study the physical world from a new perspective.

NOTE: To undertake Physics units 3 & 4 it is recommended that students have successfully completed Physics Units 1 & 2 with at least a C average.

Note: There is a fee associated with Physics Units 3/4  of $35.00 per year.**

Psychology

Psychology is a broad discipline that incorporates both the scientific study of human behaviour through biological, psychological and social perspectives and the systematic application of this knowledge to personal and social circumstances in everyday life.

 

PY1: PSYCHOLOGY 1 - HOW ARE BEHAVIOUR & MENTAL PROCESSES SHAPED?

In this unit students investigate the structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system. Students explore brain plasticity and the influence that brain damage may have on a person’s psychological functioning. They consider the complex nature of psychological development, including situations where psychological development may not occur as expected. Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary studies have made to an understanding of the human brain and its functions, and to the development of different psychological models and theories used to predict and explain the development of thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

 

PY2: PSYCHOLOGY 2 - HOW DO EXTERNAL  FACTORS INFLUENCE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

 In this unit students investigate how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted. They evaluate the role social cognition plays in a person’s attitudes, perception of themselves and relationships with others. Students explore a variety of factors and contexts that can influence the behaviour of an individual and groups. They examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of human perception and why individuals and groups behave in specific ways.

 

PY3: PSYCHOLOGY 3 - HOW DOES EXPERIENCE AFFECT BEHAVIOUR & MENTAL PROCESSES?

In this unit students examine both macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system to explain how the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the world around them. They explore how stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress. Students investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed behaviours. They consider the limitations and fallibility of memory and how memory can be improved. Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system, and to the understanding of biological, psychological and social factors that influence learning and memory.

 

PY4: PSYCHOLOGY 4 - HOW IS WELLBEING DEVELOPED & MAINTAINED?

In this unit students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning. Students explore the concept of a mental health continuum and apply a biopsychosocial approach, as a scientific model, to analyse mental health and disorder. They use specific phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors. Students examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of consciousness, including sleep, and the development of an individual’s mental functioning and wellbeing.

To undertake Psychology Units 3 and 4, students are strongly advised to satisfactorily complete Unit 2 Psychology with at least a C average.

Environmental Science

INTRODUCTION

Environmental science is an interdisciplinary science that explores the interactions and interconnectedness between humans and their environments and analyses the functions of both living and non-living elements that sustain Earth systems.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Unit 3: How can biodiversity and development be sustained?

In this unit students focus on environmental management through the examination and application of sustainability principles. They explore the value and management of the biosphere by examining the concept of biodiversity and the services provided to all living things. They analyse the processes that threaten biodiversity and apply scientific principles in evaluating biodiversity management strategies for a selected threatened endemic species. Students use a selected environmental science case study with reference to the principles of sustainability and environmental management to explore management at an Earth systems scale, including impact on the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Unit 4: How can the impacts of human energy use be reduced?

In this unit students analyse the social and environmental impacts of energy production and use on society and the environment. They explore the complexities of interacting systems of water, air, land and living organisms that influence climate, focusing on both local and global scales, and consider long-term consequences of energy production and use. Students examine scientific concepts and principles associated with energy, compare efficiencies of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources, and consider how science can be used to reduce the impacts of energy production and use. They distinguish between natural and enhanced greenhouse effects and discuss their impacts on living things and the environment, including climate change. Measurement of environmental indicators often involves uncertainty. Students develop skills in data interpretation, extrapolation and interpolation, test predictions, and recognise the limitations of provisional and incomplete data. They learn to differentiate between relationships that are correlative and those that are cause-and-effect, and make judgments about accuracy, validity and reliability of evidence.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $45.00 per year.**

VCE Technology Studies

Product Design & Technology

Design and Technology is offered in three different materials for units 1 & 2. Students can choose to focus on Wood, Textiles or Jewellery.  When students make their selection they should indicate which material(s) they are interested in studying.  Students will also be able to prioritise their selection by placing a 1 – 3 scaling against each material for back-up purposes.  For students studying Units 3 & 4, only Textiles will be offered.

 

The design process is the central component of this study. The design process involves identification of a real need that is then articulated in a design brief. The need is investigated and informed by research to aid the development of solutions leading to functional end products. Development of these solutions engages students in creative design thinking, drawing and computer-aided design, testing processes and materials, planning, construction, and evaluation. Throughout the process students acquire and apply knowledge of factors that influence design and address the design factors relevant to their design situation. Increasingly, the importance of environmental sustainability is having an impact on product design and development. Students will be required to consider their use of materials and production processes from a sustainable viewpoint.

 

PDT1: PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY 1 SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT REDEVELOPMENT

Unit 1 focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with consideration to sustainability. Students will consider the sustainability of an existing product, such as the impact of sourcing materials, manufacture, distribution, use and likely disposal. They consider how a redeveloped product may solve a problem related to the original product. Where possible, materials and manufacturing processes used should be carefully selected to improve the overall sustainability of the redeveloped product. They compare their redeveloped product with the original design and evaluate it against the needs and requirements outlined in their design brief.

MATERIALS: WOOD, TEXTILES OR JEWELLERY

 

PDT2: PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY 2 COLLABORATIVE DESIGN

Unit 2 focuses on team work or collaborative design. Teamwork encourages communication between students and mirrors professional design practice where designers often work within a team to develop solutions to design problems. Students work as a member of a team to design a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. Inspiration for the collaborative design will be inspired by historical and/or cultural design movements or styles .

MATERIALS: WOOD, TEXTILES OR JEWELLERY

Note: There is a fee associated with PDT1/2 of $140.00 per year.** Students will also be required to purchase some materials.

 

PDT3: PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY 3 APPLYING THE PRODUCT DESIGN PROCESS

Unit 3 focuses on the design and development of a product that addresses a personal, local, or global problem (such as humanitarian issues), or meets the needs and wants of a potential end-user/s. Students identify specific needs of the end-user/s, prepare a design brief, devise evaluation criteria, research and develop design options. They will examine appropriate techniques for recording and communicating data, information, visualisation of ideas, design options and working drawings and obtaining end-user/s’ feedback. Students will use creative and critical design thinking techniques throughout the product design process. Students will use evaluation criteria and end-user/s’ feedback to select a design option justifying their informed selection of the preferred design. They will plan for their production, including: material testing/trials and selection; selecting suitable production processes, their sequence and a timeline; risk assessment; and quality measures.

MATERIALS: TEXTILES

 

PDT4: PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY 4 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION

Unit 4 students engage with an end-user/s to gain feedback throughout the process of production. They learn that evaluations need to be made at various points when designing and producing a product. In the role as a designer, students judge the suitability of design ideas and options referring to the design brief and evaluation criteria in collaboration with an end-user/s. They also look at design in a broader commercial context using comparative analysis and evaluation methods to make judgements about commercial product design and development. Using appropriate materials, tools, equipment, machines and processes students apply their skills to complete the product designed in Unit 3. Students evaluate the quality of their product with reference to criteria and end-user/s’ feedback and make judgements about possible improvements. They produce relevant user instructions or care labels that highlight the product’s features for an end-user/s.

MATERIALS: TEXTILES

Note: There is a fee associated with PDT3/4 of $140.00 per year.** Students will also be required to purchase some materials

 

Food Studies

Food Studies involves studying past and present patterns of eating, Australian and global food production systems and the many physical and social functions and roles of foods. Students will develop skills in planning, preparation and evaluation of food products.

 

FT1: FOOD ORIGINS

In this unit students investigate the origins and roles of food through time and across the world. Students explore how humanity has historically sourced its food to today’s urban living and global trade in food. They look at Australian indigenous food prior to European settlement and how food patterns have changed since through the influence of food production, processing and manufacturing industries and immigration. Students investigate cuisines that are part of Australia’s culinary identity today and reflect on the concept of Australian cuisine. Students will also visit a Modern Australian restaurant that uses Native Australian Ingredients.

 

FT2: FOOD MAKERS

Students will investigate food systems in contemporary Australia focusing on commercial food production industries and food production in small-scale domestic settings. Students gain insight into the significance of food industries to the Australian economy and investigate the capacity of industry to provide safe, high-quality food that meets the needs of the consumer.

Note: There is a fee associated with FT1/2 of $290.00 per year.**

 

FT3: FOOD IN DAILY LIFE

This unit explores the science of food: our physical need for it and how it nourishes and sometimes harms our bodies. Students investigate the functional properties of food and the changes that occur during food preparation and cooking. Students will student influences on food choice and how our food patterns have changes over time.

 

FT4: FOOD ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND FUTURES

This unit explores issues about the environment, ecology, ethics, farming practices and the challenges of food security, food safety, food wastage and the use and management of water and land. This unit also focuses on individual responses to food information and misinformation and the development of food knowledge, skills and habits to empower consumers to make discerning food choices.

Note: There is a fee associated with FT3/4 of $260.00 per year.**

Computing

VCE Computing focuses on the application of a problem-solving methodology, and strategies and techniques for managing information systems in a range of contexts, to create digital solutions that meet specific needs. An important component of the study is the opportunity for students to develop social capital, that is, the shared understanding in social networks that enable cooperation and a cooperative approach to problem solving. VCE Computing provides students with opportunities to acquire and apply knowledge and skills to use digital systems efficiently and effectively when creating digital solutions both individually and as part of a network. Students investigate legal requirements and ethical responsibilities that individuals and organisations have with respect to the security and integrity of data.

 

UNIT 1 COMPUTING

In this unit students focus on how data, information and networked digital systems can be used to meet a range of users’ current and future needs. In Area of Study 1 students collect primary data when investigating an issue, practice or event and create a digital solution that graphically presents the findings of the investigation. In Area of Study 2 students examine the technical underpinnings of wireless and mobile networks, and security controls to protect stored and transmitted data, to design a network solution that meets an identified need or opportunity. They predict the impact on users if the network solution were implemented. In Area of Study 3 students acquire and apply their knowledge of information architecture and user interfaces, together with web authoring skills, when creating a website to present different viewpoints on a contemporary issue.

 

UNIT 2 COMPUTING

In this unit students focus on data and how the application of computational, design and systems thinking skills support the creation of solutions that automate the processing of data. In Area of Study 1 students develop their computational thinking skills when using a programming or scripting language to create solutions. They engage in the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology. In Area of Study 2 students develop a sound understanding of data and how a range of software tools can be used to extract data from large repositories and manipulate it to create visualisations that are clear, usable and attractive, and reduce the complexity of data. In Area of Study 3 students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using database management software and explain how they are personally affected by their interactions with a database system.

VCE Humanities

Accounting

Accounting plays an integral role in the successful operation and management of a small business. This study focuses on the financial recording, reporting and decision-making processes of a small business.

 

AC1: ROLE OF ACCOUNTING IN BUSINESS

This unit explores the establishment of a business and the role of accounting in the determination of business success or failure. In this, it considers the importance of accounting information to stakeholders. Students analyse, interpret and evaluate the performance of the business using financial and non-financial information. They use these evaluations to make recommendations regarding the suitability of a business as an investment. Students record financial data and prepare reports for service businesses owned by sole proprietors. Where appropriate, the accounting procedures developed in each area of study should incorporate the application of the Conceptual Framework and financial indicators to measure business performance and take into account the range of ethical considerations faced by business owners when making decisions, including financial, social and environmental.

 

AC2: ACCOUNTING AND DECISION-MAKING FOR A TRADING BUSINESS

In this unit students develop their knowledge of the accounting process for sole proprietors operating a trading business, with a focus on inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. Students use manual processes and ICT, including spreadsheets, to prepare historical and budgeted accounting reports. Students analyse and evaluate the performance of the business relating to inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. They use relevant financial and other information to predict, budget and compare the potential effects of alternative strategies on the performance of the business. Using these evaluations, students develop and suggest to the owner strategies to improve business performance.

 

AC3: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FOR A TRADING BUSINESS

This unit focuses on financial accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor and highlights the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording. Students develop their understanding of the accounting processes for recording and reporting and consider the effect of decisions made on the performance of the business. They interpret reports and information presented in a variety of formats and suggest strategies to the owner to improve the performance of the business.

 

AC4: RECORDING,  REPORTING, BUDGETING AND DECISION-MAKING

In this unit students further develop their understanding of accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor and the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data, and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording. Both manual methods and ICT are used to record and report. Students extend their understanding of the recording and reporting process with the inclusion of balance day adjustments and alternative depreciation methods. They investigate both the role and importance of budgeting in decision-making for a business. They analyse and interpret accounting reports and graphical representations to evaluate the performance of a business. From this evaluation, students suggest strategies to business owners to improve business performance.

 

Business Management

Business Management examines the ways in which people at a variety of levels within a business organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. Students develop an understanding of the challenges, complexity and rewards that come from business management and gain insight into the various ways resources can be managed in small, medium and large-scale organisations.

 

BM1: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 1  - PLANNING A BUSINESS

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, and the effect of these on planning a business

 

BM2: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 2 - ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS

This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years.

Note: There is a fee associated with Business Management Units 1/2  of $20.00 per year.**

 

BM3: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3 - MANAGING A BUSINESS 

In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

 

BM4: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 4 - TRANSFORMING A BUSINESS

Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

Note: There is a fee associated with Business Management Units 3/4  of $5.00 per year.**

Twentieth Century History and History Revolutions

History involves inquiry into human action in the past, to make meaning of the past using primary sources as evidence. As students formulate questions, revise interpretations and discover new sources, fresh understandings come to light. VCE History reflects this range of inquiry by enabling students to engage with a range of times, people, places and ideas. Twentieth century History examines the aftermath of the Great War as well as the causes and consequences of World War Two, while History Revolutions explores the causes and consequences of revolutions in France and Russia. ​

 

HI1: TWENTIETH CENTURY HISTORY (1900-1945)

The first half of the twentieth century was a period of significant change. Old certainties were replaced by new uncertainties. Societies and individuals were in a state of flux and all that seemed guaranteed was increased change. Throughout this period new forms of economic and political organisation and cultural expression reflecting different responses to these changes emerged. This unit considers the way in which Western societies responded to these changes, how they affected everyday life, and the development of domestic and international crises.

 

HI2: TWENTIETH CENTURY HISTORY (SINCE 1945)

This Unit provides the opportunity to investigate major themes and principal events of post-war history: the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the emergence of social movements such as the Black Civil Rights movement and peace movements, the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the end of the apartheid and the development of organisations such as the European Union, North American Free Trade (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

 

HR3: HISTORY 3 - REVOLUTIONS

This Unit examines a revolution from its deliberate attempt to break with the past by its destruction of the old order, through to its program of radical transformation in an attempt to establish a new order. In Unit 3 the Russian Revolution is the focus of study and it entails an examination of Russian Society from 1905 to 1924.

HR4: HISTORY 4 - REVOLUTIONS

This Unit examines a revolution from its deliberate attempt to break with the past by its destruction of the old order, through to its program of radical transformation in an attempt to establish a new order. In Unit 4 the Chinese Revolution is the focus of study and it entails an examination of Chinese Society from 1898 to 1976.

Australian and Global Politics

In the twenty-first century, decisions and actions by governments, groups and individuals are increasingly global in their impact. International politics will enable students to understand and reflect on contemporary national and international political issues, problems and events and the forces that shape them.

 

AP1: IDEAS, ACTORS AND POWER

In this unit students are introduced to the key ideas relating to the exercise of political power. They explore how these ideas shape political systems and in particular the characteristics of liberalism. They consider the nature of power in Australian democracy and in a non-democratic political system. They also explore the nature and influence of key political actors in Australia: political parties, interest groups and the media. All these forms of participation in Australian democracy influence the political agenda. This unit is contemporary in focus and students must use examples and case studies from within the last 10 years.

 

AP2: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

This unit introduces students to the global community and the global actors that are part of this community. In Area of Study 1 students explore the myriad ways lives have been affected by the increased interconnectedness – the global links – of the world through the process of globalisation. In Area of Study 2, students consider the extent to which global actors cooperate and share visions and goals as part of the global community. They investigate the ability of the global community to manage areas of global cooperation and to respond to issues of global conflict and instability.

Note: There is a fee associated with AP1/2 of $20.00 per year.**

 

GP3: GLOBAL ACTORS

In this unit students investigate the key global actors of contemporary global politics. They use evidence to analyse the key global actors and their aims, roles and power. They develop an understanding of the key actors through an in-depth examination of the concepts of national interests and power as they relate to the state, and the way in which one Asia-Pacific state uses power to achieve its objectives. VCE Global Politics is a contemporary study and focus must be on examples and case studies from within the last 10 years. However, contemporary issues and events may need to be contextualised for students and this may require some investigation prior to this timeframe.

 

GP4: GLOBAL CHALLENGES

In this unit students investigate key global challenges facing the international community in the 21st century. They examine and analyse the debates surrounding two ethical issues that are underpinned by international law. They then evaluate the effectiveness of responses to these issues. Students also explore the context and causes of global crises and consider the varying effectiveness of responses and challenges to resolving them.

Legal Studies

Legal Studies is about the way the law relates to and serves both individuals and the community. It focuses on developing an understanding of the way in which law is generated, structured and operates in Australia.

 

LS1: GUILT AND LIABILITY

Criminal law and civil law aim to achieve social cohesion and protect the rights of individuals. In this unit, students investigate the key concepts of criminal can civil law, and apply these to actual and hypothetical cases to determine whether a defendant may be found guilty of a crime or liable in a civil matter.

 

LS2: SANCTIONS, REMEDIES AND RIGHTS

In this unit, students explore the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute. Students examine the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and evaluate their effectiveness. Students undertake a detailed investigation of two criminal cases and two civil cases from the past four yuears to form a judgement about the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve the principles of justice. Students also develop their understanding of the way human rights are protected in Australia and in another country.

Note: There is a fee associated with Legal Studies Units 1/2  of $15.00 per year.**

 

LS3: RIGHTS AND JUSTICE

The Victorian justice system aims to protect the rights of individuals and uphold the priniciples of justice: fairness, equality and access. In this unit, students examine the methods and institutions in the criminal and civil justice systems. Students explore a range of topics including the rights of the accused and the victims in criminal matters, the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties to a dispute. Students also evaluate the extent to which the principles of justice are upheld in the justice system. Throughout this unit, students apply legal reasoning and information to actual and hypothetical criminal and civil cases.

 

LS4: PEOPLE AND THE LAW

In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and state parliaments, and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on parliament in law-making. Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law-making, and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform.

Sociology

Sociology focuses on the study of human behaviour and social interaction to understand how societies are organised, develop and change. Sociology encourages us to become aware and to think about the everyday things that we tend to take for granted.

 

SO1: YOUTH AND FAMILY

Unit 1 of Sociology explores the social category of youth and the social institution of family. Students analyse the way youth is constructed as a social category, in the light of differing experiences of young people. Students explore how and why the experience of being young differs across time and space. The second area of study focuses on the social institution of the family. In a multicultural society like Australia, different communities have different kinds of families and experiences of family life. Students analyse how factors such as changing demographics, feminism, individualism, technology and government policy affect the institution of family. 

 

SO2: SOCIAL NORMS: BREAKING THE CODE

Unit 2 of Sociology focuses on the concepts of deviance and crime. Students explore different types of rule breaking behaviour and examine traditional views of criminality and deviance to investigate why people commit crimes or engage in deviant behaviour. Students also consider the criminal justice system to understand how crime and deviance has changed over time.

 

SO3: CULTURE AND ETHNICITY

This unit explores expressions of culture and ethnicity within Australian society in two different contexts – Australian Indigenous culture, and ethnicity in relation to migrant groups. The first area of study involves a critical exploration of the historical suppression of, and increasing public awareness of, Australian Indigenous culture. Ethnicity is Investigated in Area of Study 2. Ethnicity is a key sociological category that plays an important role in social life. Individuals often define themselves, or others, as members of at least one ethnic group based on a common heritage that gives them a unique social identity. Ethnicity is not fixed and unchanging; instead, ethnic identities constantly evolve and are shaped through a variety of political, cultural and social forces. Students develop an understanding of a variety of barriers and enablers that need to be considered when investigating experiences of ethnicity.

 

SO4: COMMUNITY, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND SOCIAL CHANGE

In this unit students explore the ways sociologists have thought about the idea of community and how the various types of community are experienced. They examine the relationship between social movements and social change. Students explore the changing definitions and experiences of community. This includes an examination of the challenges and opportunities posed by political, social, economic and technological change. Students analyse the concept of community with particular reference to the theory of Ferdinand Tonnies. Students also investigate the role of social movements. They develop an understanding of the purpose, evolution, power and outcomes of social movements.

Note: There is a fee associated with Sociology Units 3/4  of $20.00 per year.**

Philosophy

The word philosophy means love of wisdom. This study introduces the critical methods of argument and analysis that have been developed by philosophers in response to such central questions as “What is knowledge?” or “What is existence?”  It will involve the use of techniques of reasoning, logic and argument in the development of responses to the questions of philosophy as they relate to life and participation in contemporary society.

 

PL1: EXISTENCE, KNOWLEDGE AND REASONING

What is the nature of reality? How can we acquire certain knowledge? These are some of the questions that have challenged humans for millennia and underpin ongoing endeavours in areas as diverse as science, justice and the arts. This unit engages students with fundamental philosophical questions through active, guided investigation and critical discussion of two key areas of philosophy: epistemology and metaphysics. Students investigate relevant debates in applied epistemology and metaphysics and consider whether the philosophical bases of these debates continue to have relevance in contemporary society and our everyday lives. The emphasis is on philosophical inquiry – ‘doing philosophy’, for example through formulation of questions and philosophical exchanges with others. Hence the study and practice of techniques of reasoning are central to this unit. As students learn to think philosophically, appropriate examples of philosophical viewpoints and arguments, both contemporary and historical, are used to support, stimulate and enhance their thinking about central concepts and problems.

 

PL2: QUESTIONS OF VALUE

What are the foundations of our judgments about value? What is the relationship between different types of value? How, if at all, can particular value judgments be defended or criticised? This unit enables students to explore these questions in relation to different categories of value judgment within the realms of morality, political and social philosophy and aesthetics. Students also explore ways in which viewpoints and arguments in value theory can inform and be informed by contemporary debates. They study at least one primary philosophical text, using the complete text or an extract, and develop a range of skills including formulating philosophical questions and informed responses.

 

PL3: MINDS, BODIES AND PERSONS

This unit considers basic questions regarding the mind and the self through two key questions: Are human beings more than their bodies? Is there a basis for the belief that an individual remains the same person over time? Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments put forward in philosophical sources to their own views on these questions and to contemporary debates.

 

PL4: THE GOOD LIFE

This unit considers the crucial question of what it is for a human to live well. What does an understanding of human nature tell us about what it is to live well? What is the role of happiness in a life well lived? Is morality central to a good life? How does our social context impact on our conception of a good life? In this unit, students explore philosophical texts that have had a significant impact on western ideas about the good life. Students critically compare the viewpoints and arguments in set texts to their views on how we should live, and use their understandings to inform a reasoned response to contemporary debates.

Note: There is a fee associated with Philosophy Units 3/4  of $20.00 per year.**

VCE Languages

Studying a language enables students to better understand the world and communicate with people from other cultures. Knowledge of a Language can provide students with enhanced career opportunities in many fields, including tourism, journalism, international trade, diplomacy and interpreting. Preference is often given to job applicants who have studied a language, even if that language is not directly relevant to the position. Languages offered:

  • French (FR)
  • Chinese Second Language (CSL)
  • Chinese Second Language Advanced (CSLA)
  • Chinese - First Language (CFS)

COURSE OUTLINES

All language courses comprise a variety of topics that fit in to 3 broad themes: The Individual, Chinese/French-Speaking Communities, and The Changing World. These topics are the vehicle through which students demonstrate their mastery of text-types (including letters and emails, diary entries, speeches, articles, reports, short stories) and kinds of writing (personal, informative, persuasive, evaluative and imaginative). Students continue to extend their vocabulary and strengthen their grammar by undertaking tasks focusing on listening, reading, writing and speaking.

French, Chinese (Second Language)

French and the Second Language level of Chinese are designed for students who will, typically, have studied the language for at least 200 hours prior to the commencement of Unit 1. It is possible, however, that some students with less formal experience will also be able to meet the requirements successfully. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. Entry into the second language level of Chinese is governed by eligibility criteria. See the Learning Area Manager or the Year Level Leader 12 for further information.

Note: There is a fee associated with French Units 1/2 of $30.00 per year.**

Note: There is a fee associated with Chinese (Second Language ) 1/2 of $25.00 per year.**

Note: There is a fee associated with Chinese (Second Language Advanced) 3/4 of $25.00 per year.**

Chinese (Second Language Advanced)

The Second Language Advanced level of Chinese is designed for students with some experience in an education system where Chinese is the medium of instruction. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. Entry is governed by eligibility criteria. See the Learning Area Manager or the Year Level Leader 12 for further information.

Note: There is a fee associated with Chinese (Second Language Advanced) 3/4 of $25.00 per year.**

 

Chinese (First Language)

The First Language level of Chinese is designed for students who will, typically, have spent some time as a resident and/or have had significant experience of studying the language in a country in which that language is a major language of communication. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4. Entry is governed by eligibility criteria. See the Learning Area Manager or the Year Level Leader 12 for further information.

Note: There is a fee associated with Chinese (First Language) 1/2 of $25.00 per year.**

Note: There is a fee associated with Chinese (First Language) 3/4 of $25.00 per year.**


VCE Health & PE

Health & Human Development

Through the study of VCE Health and Human Development, students investigate health and human development in local, Australian and global communities.

 

UNIT 1— UNDERSTANDING HEALTH AND WELLBEING

This unit looks at health and wellbeing as a concept with varied and evolving perspectives and definitions. It takes the view that health and wellbeing are subject to a wide range of contexts and interpretations, with different meanings for different people. As a foundation to the understanding of health, students will investigate the World Health Organization’s (WHO) definition and also explore other interpretations. Wellbeing is a complex combination of all dimensions of health, characterised by an equilibrium in which the individual feels happy, healthy, capable and engaged. Students will consider wellbeing to be an implicit element of health. In this unit students identify personal perspectives and priorities relating to health and wellbeing, and enquire into factors that influence health attitudes, beliefs and practices, including among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. Students look at multiple dimensions of health and wellbeing, the complex interplay of influences on health and wellbeing and the indicators used to measure and evaluate health status. With a focus on youth, students consider their own health as individuals and as a cohort. They build health literacy through interpreting and using data, through investigating the role of food, and through extended inquiry into one youth health focus area.

 

UNIT 2—MANAGING HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This unit investigates transitions in health and wellbeing, and development, from lifespan and societal perspectives. Students look at changes and expectations that are part of the progression from youth to adulthood. This unit promotes the application of health literacy skills through an examination of adulthood as a time of increasing independence and responsibility, involving the establishment of long-term relationships, possible considerations of parenthood and management of health-related milestones and changes. Students enquire into the Australian healthcare system and extend their capacity to access and analyse health information. They investigate the challenges and opportunities presented by digital media and health technologies, and consider issues surrounding the use of health data and access to quality health care.

 

UNIT 3: AUSTRALIA’S HEALTH IN A GLOBALISED WORLD

This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts. Students explore health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry. As they consider the benefits of optimal health and wellbeing and its importance as an individual and a collective resource, their thinking extends to health as a universal right. Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organization (WHO). They use this knowledge as background to their analysis and evaluation of variations in the health status of Australians. Area of Study 2 focuses on health promotion and improvements in population health over time. Students look at various public health approaches and the interdependence of different models as they research health improvements and evaluate successful programs. While the emphasis is on the Australian health system, the progression of change in public health approaches should be seen within a global context.

 

UNIT 4: HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Students investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live. Students build their understanding of health in a global context through examining changes in burden of disease over time and studying the key concepts of sustainability and human development. They consider the health implications of increased globalisation and worldwide trends relating to climate change, digital technologies, world trade and the mass movement of people. Area of Study 2 looks at global action to improve health and wellbeing and human development, focusing on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and the work of the World Health Organization. Students investigate the role of non-government organisations and Australia’s overseas aid program. Students evaluate the effectiveness of health initiatives and programs in a global context and reflect on their capacity to take action.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $65.00 per year for units 3/4. **

 

Health and Human Development on the VCAA website:

http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/healthnhuman/healthumindex.aspx

Outdoor & Environmental Studies

Due to the highly practical nature of this subject, there is a cost of approximately $840 per year to cover transport, accommodation, activities for camps and excursions. Please note: If a student withdraws from this elective or does not attend a camp/activity, there may be no refund. Please refer to the schools’ refund policy for further information. **

 

OE3: OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 3

The focus of this unit is the ecological, historical and social contexts of relationships between humans and outdoor environments in Australia. Case studies of a range of impacts on outdoor environments are examined in the context of the changing nature of human relationships with outdoor environments in Australia. Students consider a number of factors that influence relationships with outdoor environments. They also examine the dynamic nature of relationships between humans and their environment. Students are involved in one or more experiences in outdoor environments, including in areas where there is evidence of human interaction. Through these practical experiences students are able to make comparisons between and to reflect upon outdoor environments, as well as to develop theoretical knowledge and skills about specific natural environments.

There are 2 outcomes per Unit of work including:

  • Explain and evaluate how relationships with Australian outdoor environments have changed over time, with reference to specific outdoor experiences.
  • Analyse and evaluate the factors influencing societal relationships with outdoor environments since 1990, with reference to specific outdoor experiences.

OE4: OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 4

In this unit students explore the sustainable use and management of outdoor environments. They examine the contemporary state of environments in Australia, consider the importance of healthy outdoor environments, and examine the issues relating to the capacity of outdoor environments to support the future needs of the Australian population. Students examine the importance of developing a balance between human needs and the conservation of outdoor environments and consider the skills needed to be environmentally responsible citizens. They investigate current acts and conventions as well as management strategies for achieving and maintaining healthy and sustainable environments in contemporary Australian society. Students engage in one or more related experiences in outdoor environments. They learn and apply the practical skills and knowledge required to sustain healthy outdoor environments, and evaluate the strategies and actions they employ. Through these practical experiences students are able to make comparisons between and to reflect upon outdoor environments, as well as to develop and apply theoretical knowledge about outdoor environments.

There are 2 outcomes per Unit of work including:

  • Evaluate the contemporary state of Australian outdoor environments and analyse the importance of healthy outdoor environments and sustainability for individuals and society, with reference to specific outdoor experiences.
  • Analyse conflicts over the use of outdoor environments, and evaluate practices and strategies for sustaining outdoor environments, with reference to specific outdoor experiences.

Outdoor and Environmental Studies on the VCAA website:

http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/outdoor/outdoorindex.aspx

 

Physical Education

UNIT 1: THE HUMAN BODY IN MOTION

  • Explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement
  • Investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise
  • Explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity
  • Evaluate the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement
  • Consider the implications of the use of legal and illegal practices to improve the performance
  • Recommend and implement strategies to minimise the risk of illness or injury to each system

UNIT 2: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, SPORT AND SOCIETY

  • Understand physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective
  • Explore different types of physical activity promoted in their own and different population groups
  • Create and participate in an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines
  • Apply various methods to assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels at the individual and population level
  • Study and apply the social-ecological model

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $60.00 per year for units 1/2. **

 

UNIT 3: MOVEMENT SKILLS AND ENERGY FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

  • Apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise
  • Analyse energy production from a physiological perspective
  • Investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems to performance in physical activity, sport and exercise
  • Investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity
  • Explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery

UNIT 4: TRAINING TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

  • Apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance
  • Analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity
  • Participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods
  • Critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods
  • Evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective
  • Physical Education Units 3 and 4 is a combination of practical and theory classes and is suitable for students who like to apply theory to practical situations.

Note: There is a fee associated with this course of $75.00 per year for units 3/4. **


VET

What is VET?

Vocational Education and Training programs are designed to help students make the transition to further education or training, work, or a blend of both training and work.

Why Choose a VET Program?

  • To increase the options available for students to participate in vocational education and training during their secondary schooling.
  • To enhance both employment and education for young people by developing partnerships between schools and employers.
  • To provide students with the option of undertaking a broad range of studies to meet their individual needs.
  • To respond to the needs of industry by providing young people with a greater range of more relevant skills.

VCE VET Studies

VCE VET programs provide the opportunity to undertake entry level TAFE training within the VCE. On completion, students will have obtained their VCE and a Vocational Educational and Training certificate, which will allow them to either move on to further education and training or to seek employment. These programs broaden post-school options with workplace and training experiences, which enhance student readiness for further training and employment. VCE VET programs are fully recognised within the Unit 1-4 structure of the VCE and therefore may contribute towards satisfactory completion of VCE. VCE VET units have equal status with other VCE studies. Some VCE VET units are scored and thus can be included in the student’s primary four subjects in their ATAR calculation. Non-scored VCE VET subjects are calculated using ten percent of the lowest study score of the primary four VCE studies. 

Program Delivery and Costs

VET courses are normally delivered on Wednesday afternoons from 1:45pm until approximately 5.45 pm by fully qualified Workplace Trainers and Assessors. The courses are delivered at a range of venues including industry locations, secondary schools and TAFE institutes around the Melbourne metropolitan region.  There is a delivery cost associated with VET courses that will be announced in Term 4 of each year. 

Year 10/11 VET Programs

NOTE: The availability of these VET programs is dependent on student numbers, cost and location, which are all determined by The Inner Melbourne VET Cluster (IMVC). This information is confirmed in Term 4 each year. Students will be notified if any of the programs are no longer available. The list on the left is current at the time of publishing but is subject to change.

Certificate III in Acting

Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance

Certificate II in Animal Studies

Certificate II in Applied Fashion & Technology

Certificate III in Community Services

Certificate II in Dance

Certificate III in Design Fundamentals

Certificate III In Early Childhood Education & Care (partial completion)

Certificate II in Equine studies

Certificate II in Furniture Making Pathways

Certificate II in Hospitality (Dual Program – Year 1)

Certificate II in Hospitality (Front of House – Year 2)

Certificate II in Kitchen Operations (Back of House – Year 2)

Certificate III in Laboratory Skills

Certificate III in Make-up

Certificate II/III in Music Industry (Performance Specialisation)

Certificate II/III in Music Industry (Electronic Music Creation & Performance Focus)

Certificate III in Music Industry (Sound Production)

Certificate II in Printing and Graphic Arts

Certificate II in Retail Cosmetics (1 year program)

Certificate II in Salon Assistant

Certificate III in Screen & Media (Creative Digital Media or Games Design & Animation)

Certificate II in Visual Arts

Please visit the Careers Office for more information on these VET programs.

 

Career Opportunities

Important Careers Notes

Students should ensure that their Senior School program fulfils their entrance requirements for any tertiary course that they are contemplating. More information on these is available from the Careers Room, VTAC Website, Year 10 Guide (http://www.vtac.edu.au/) and handbooks from Tertiary Institutions. Most tertiary institutions have an Internet site where students can source further information.

 

Students are encouraged to re-visit their Careers FastTrack Portfolio (from Year 10) to assist them with their subject selection. It is also important that students read the weekly Careers Newsletter that is posted on Compass Newsfeed to keep up to date with all the current news and requirements.

What is a VCE Pathway?

Each ‘Pathway” is not a pre-set combination of units, but rather a suggested package. You should use the Pathways section to help you in construction your own VCE program, which you should do in discussion with your Parents, Teachers and Career Advisers (Wellbeing teachers) and by reading a variety of literature such as the Tertiary Entrance Requirements Booklet, The Careers Guide, Tertiary Institutions’ Websites or their Course Guides, Career Pamphlets or visiting www.myfuture.edu.au or the VTAC website’s course search program available at  www.vtac.edu.au

 

You do not have to choose one of the following Pathways, and you can mix and match different Pathways, but we hope they will be of assistance. Subject changes are possible at the end of Unit 1, however consideration must be given tertiary course pre-requisites and should always be done in consultation with Year Level Leaders and the Careers Leader.

Why Do We Have Pathways?

To help you and your Parents/Carers see the connections between VCE and Tertiary study.

To provide coherence to your program of studies.

To provide purpose, focus and direction to your program of studies.

To give a clear career focus to VCE for you and your Teachers.

How Do I Use The Pathways?

First let me remind you to check the very latest information about the pre-requisites for the courses and careers that you are currently interested in pursuing when you leave school. The 2021 Pre-requisites list can be found on the VTAC website or you may like to use the Pre-requisite and Course Explorer.  These resources list the pre-requisites subjects that current year 10 students should study in their VCE if they wish to apply for university or TAFE after Year 12. This publication can be accessed on the VTAC website www.vtac.edu.au.

 

TAFE course information is also available at:

http://www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway/Pages/home.aspx.

 

All Year 10 students are given access to the VTAC Year 10 Guide containing the relevant pre-requisite information when it is released in July. Pre-requisites cannot be avoided. They are set in stone. If you do not complete the relevant pre-requisite(s), it doesn’t matter what your final ATAR score might be; you will not be considered for the course.  Let me also remind you to KEEP YOUR OPTIONS OPEN and ensure that, if you do change your mind later, you still have a chance to meet the pre-requisites of most courses. For those with no idea of the direction they wish to pursue “keeping your options open” is even more vital!

How Do I Keep "My Options" Open?

The greatest restriction to Tertiary course entry is because of maths pre-requisites.  Therefore taking the Maths subject which best suits your capacity is a very wise starting point.  This may mean Maths Methods or Further Maths.  It may also mean you choose to do no maths but you need to check very carefully the implications of such a VCE course. For example, failure to do any Unit 1 & 2 maths means all teaching (Education) programs at University (Undergraduate Level) are no longer available. Similarly certain science subjects are demanded for a range of Health related specialisations. Chemistry is probably the one science subject that keeps more doors open than any other.  Of course if you already know the health area is not for you or chemistry is of little interest, there is no point in selecting it.

 

Do I have any ability in the units I wish to pursue?

Think about your results in similar subjects at Year 9 & 10!!

Do I enjoy that field of work that these units would lead me to?

Think about Work Experience, your own observations of the workplace and people you (or your Parents/Carers) know in that career.

How does each of these units relate to my current career intention?

Think about past experiences in each study, or ask a teacher!!

Have I kept my options open to make a change later, if necessary?

Read the section above again!!

VCE Pathways

Engineering/Computing

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

TAFE

Diplomas Certificates in:

  • Engineering
  • Aerospace
  • Systems/Civil
  • Computer Systems
  • Electrical/Electronics
  • Mechanical/Manufacturing
  • Applied Science

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in

  • Engineering
  • Environmental Health Science
  • Science related courses 
  • Science & Maths Education
  • Medicine
  • Computing Systems/ICT
  • Double Degree courses

Science

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Engineering
  • Computer Systems
  • Civil, Electrical/Electronics, Mechanical/Manufacturing
  • Applied Science
  • Social Science

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Optometry 
  • Physiotherapy
  • Forest Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Health 
  • Science & Applied Science 
  • Science & Maths Education
  • Medicine
  • Double Degree courses
  • Biomedical Science

Environmental Science

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE

Diplomas Certificates in:

  • Applied Science
  • Horticulture
  • Farming

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Agribusiness
  • Agricultural
  • Environmental Health
  • Science & Science related courses
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Double Degree courses

Accounting/Business/Commerce

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Accounting
  • Office Administration
  • Business (Accounting)
  • Information Technology
  • Marketing

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Accounting
  • Business & Business Systems
  • Finance & Marketing
  • Management
  • Information Technology
  • Commerce
  • International Trade
  • Education
  • Retail
  • Hotel Management

Human Services

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Health Sciences

  • Social & Community Service

  • Occupational Studies

  • Resource Management

  • Hospitality Studies

  • Residential & Community Services

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Childcare
  • Chiropractic & Occupational Therapy
  • Nursing &Paramedics
  • Physiotherapy & Human Movement
  • Physical Education
  • Hospitality Studies & Midwifery
  • Teaching
  • Welfare
  • Psychology
  • Recreation
  • Arts

Travel/Tourism

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Travel & Tourism

  • Social & Community Services

  • Human & Social Sciences

  • Marketing

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Arts/Humanities
  • Social Science/Social Work
  • Family Studies
  • Hotel Management
  • Public Relations\Marketing
  • Travel & Tourism
  • Journalism

Visual & Performing Arts

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Media, Film & Television

  • Music

  • Performing Arts

  • Visual Arts

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Media
  • Film & Television
  • Performing Arts
  • Music
  • Design

Humanities

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Social & Community Services

  • Law and Security

  • Humanities & Social Science

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Humanities
  • Social Science
  • Welfare Studies & Social Work
  • Law
  • Speech Pathology
  • Teaching
  • Health/Medical Records
  • Early Childhood Studies
  • Police Studies

Catering/Food

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Hospitality & Tourism

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Travel/Tourism
  • Home Economics
  • Hospitality
  • Business Management
  • Teaching

Design Based Courses

EMPLOYMENT

Limited opportunities exist for students seeking employment direct from VCE, therefore, to get into this industry further education is required on most occasions. See a Careers Adviser for details.

 

TAFE
Diplomas & Certificates in:

  • Fashion Design & Technology

  • Building Design, Design

  • Product Design

  • Textiles Design & Development

  • Furniture Design & Technology

UNIVERSITY

Courses at various institutions in:

  • Industrial Design
  • Fashion Design/Technology
  • Architecture
  • Textile Design
  • Fine Art
  • Communication Design
  • Graphic Design

Any Other Pathways

 

VET programs will contribute a unit 1-4 sequence in their own right for completion of the VCE. Up to three sequences, other than English can be approved VET VCE Unit 3 and 4 sequences. However note that VET retail programs often completed as part of a casual job will usually only represent a further unit 1 & 2 sequence and will not provide any contribution to a student’s final ATAR score.

Visit the VCAA website for more information http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vet/index.aspx  

 

Think about your:

  • Pre-requisites
  • Best Four Subjects
  • Middle Band Selections
  • Skills and Abilities
  • Past Experiences
  • Interests

Links and Resources

Resources

THE GOOD CAREERS GUIDE             

http://goodeducation.com.au/good-careers-guide/

This is where you can look up different occupations and find out what they do and what training/education is required.

 

VTAC GUIDE                  

www.vtac.edu.au

This guide lists most courses and their pre-requisites/requirements in Victoria

 

CAREERS FastTrack Portfolio from Year 10

This will remind you of some your areas of interest that you may wish to explore further.

 

Prerequisite List and Course Explorer

http://delta.vtac.edu.au/CourseSearch/prerequisiteplanner.htm

This resource lists the pre-requisites that have been set for university courses for the year that you will enter tertiary education.

 

VCAA STUDY DESIGNS
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/index.aspx

This website includes detailed study designs and assessment.

 

TAFE http://www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway/Pages/home.aspx

Senior School Handbook